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Profile: Mary Morgan (Salt Lake City Community College)
  1. Mary S. Morgan & Marcel J. Boumans, Secrets Hidden by Two-Dimensionality: The Economy as a Hydraulic Machine.
    A long-standing tradition presents economic activity in terms of the flow of fluids. This metaphor lies behind a small but influential practice of hydraulic modelling in economics. Yet turning the metaphor into a three-dimensional hydraulic model of the economic system entails making numerous and detailed commitments about the analogy between hydraulics and the economy. The most famous 3-D model in economics is probably the Phillips machine, the central object of this paper.
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  2. Mary S. Morgan (forthcoming). Resituating Knowledge: Generic Strategies and Case Studies. .
    This paper addresses the problem of how scientific knowledge, which is always locally generated, becomes accepted in other sites. The analysis suggests that there are a small number of strategies that enable scientists to resituate knowledge and that these strategies are generic: they are not restricted to specific disciplines or modes of doing science but rather are found in a variety of different forms across the sciences.
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  3. Mary S. Morgan (2013). Experiencing Life Through Modeling. Perspectives on Science 21 (2):245-249.
    Graeme Earl's paper on computer graphic modeling in archaeology raises many themes of interest for the philosopher of science, although, as is to be expected of complex social and technical disciplinary practices, these philosophical issues are not to be easily separated or neatly labeled. On the one hand, the modeling practices and concerns of the archaeologists dispute (or even disrupt) the philosophers' traditional notions, while the formers' reective commentaries offer sophisticated analyses that go beyond the latters' traditional reflections on models. (...)
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  4. Mary S. Morgan & Till Grüne-Yanoff (2013). Modeling Practices in the Social and Human Sciences. An Interdisciplinary Exchange. Perspectives on Science 21 (2):143-156.
    Philosophers of science studying scientific practice often consider it a methodological requirement that their conceptualization of "model" closely connects with the understanding and use of models by practicing scientists. Occasionally, this connection has been explicitly made (Hutten 1954, Suppes 1961, Morgan and Morrison 1999, Bailer-Jones 2002, Lehtinen and Kuorikoski 2007, Kuorikoski 2007, Morgan 2012a). These studies have been dominated by a focus on the—relatively similar forms of—mathematical models in physics and economics. Yet it has become increasingly evident that the way (...)
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  5. Mary S. Morgan (2012). Case Studies: One Observation or Many? Justification or Discovery? Philosophy of Science 79 (5):667-677.
    Critiques of case studies as an epistemic genre usually focus on the domain of justification and hinge on comparisons with statistics and laboratory experiments. In this domain, case studies can be defended by the notion of “infirming”: they use many different bits of evidence, each of which may independently “infirm” the account. Yet their efficacy may be more powerful in the domain of discovery, in which these same different bits of evi- dence must be fully integrated to create an explanatory (...)
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  6. Mary S. Morgan (2011). Seeking Parts, Looking for Wholes. In Lorraine Daston & Elizabeth Lunbeck (eds.), Histories of Scientific Observation. The University of Chicago Press.
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  7. Peter Howlett & Mary S. Morgan (eds.) (2010). How Well Do Facts Travel?: The Dissemination of Reliable Knowledge. Cambridge University Press.
    Machine generated contents note: 1. Travelling facts Mary S. Morgan; Part I. Matters of Fact: 2. Facts and building artefacts: what travels in material objects? Simona Valeriani; 3. A journey through times and cultures? Ancient Greek forms in American 19th century architecture: an archaeological view Lambert Schneider; 4. Manning's N: putting roughness to work Sarah J. Whatmore and Catharina Landström; 5. My facts are better than your facts: spreading good news about global warming Naomi Oreskes; 6. Real problems with fictional (...)
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  8. Mary S. Morgan (2005). Experiments Versus Models: New Phenomena, Inference and Surprise. Journal of Economic Methodology 12 (2):317-329.
    A comparison of models and experiments supports the argument that although both function as mediators and can be understood to work in an experimental mode, experiments offer greater epistemic power than models as a means to investigate the economic world. This outcome rests on the distinction that whereas experiments are versions of the real world captured within an artificial laboratory environment, models are artificial worlds built to represent the real world. This difference in ontology has epistemic consequences: experiments have greater (...)
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  9. Michael Dickson, Don Howard, Scott Tanona, Mathias Frisch, Eric Winsberg, Arnold Koslow, Paul Teller, Ronald N. Giere, Mary S. Morgan & Mauricio Suárez (2004). 1. Preface Preface (P. Vii). Philosophy of Science 71 (5).
     
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  10. Mary S. Morgan (2004). Imagination and Imaging in Model Building. Philosophy of Science 71 (5):753-766.
    Modelling became one of the primary tools of mathematical economic research in the twentieth century, but when we look at examples of how nonanalogical models were first built in economics, both the process of making representations and aspects of the representing relation remain opaque. Like early astronomers, economists have to imagine how the hidden parts of their world are arranged and to make images, that is, create models, to represent how they work. The case of the Edgeworth Box, a model (...)
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  11. Mary S. Morgan (2004). Simulation: The Birth of a Technology to Create «Evidence» in Economics/La Simulation: Naissance d'Une Technologie de la Création des «Indices» En Économie. Revue d'Histoire des Sciences 57 (2):339-375.
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  12. Mary S. Morgan (2002). Symposium on Marshall's Tendencies: 1 How Models Help Economists to Know. Economics and Philosophy 18 (1):5-16.
    Over the last 40 years or so, economics has become a modelling science: a science in which models have become one of the main epistemological tools both for theoretical and applied work. But providing an account of how models work and what they do for the economist is not easy. For the philosopher of economics like me, struggling with this question, John Sutton's views on the nature and design of economic models and how they work is indeed thought provoking. Because (...)
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  13. Marcel Boumans & Mary S. Morgan (2001). Ceteris Paribus Conditions: Materiality and the Application of Economic Theories. Journal of Economic Methodology 8 (1):11-26.
  14. Mary S. Morgan (2001). Models, Stories and the Economic World. Journal of Economic Methodology 8 (3):361-384.
    Stories form an integral part of models. An economic model can not be fully characterized simply by knowing its structure: the model can only be completely described when we know how it works and what it can do. This activity of manipulating a model requires a narrative device, such as a question, which sets off a story told with the model. The structure or system portrayed in the model constrains and shapes the stories that can be told, but without stories (...)
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  15. Roger E. Backhouse & Mary S. Morgan (2000). Introduction: Is Data Mining a Methodological Problem? Journal of Economic Methodology 7 (2):171-181.
    This survey of the symposium papers argues that the problem of data mining should be of interest to both practicing econometricians and specialists in economic methodology. After summarizing some of the main points to arise in the symposium, it draws on recent work in the philosophy of science to point to parallels between data mining and practices engaged in routinely by experimental scientists. These suggest that data mining might be seen in a more positive light than conventional doubts about it (...)
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  16. Mary S. Morgan (1999). Learningjrom models. In Margaret Morrison & Mary Morgan (eds.), Models as Mediators. 52--347.
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  17. Mary S. Morgan (1997). The Technology of Analogical Models: Irving Fisher's Monetary Worlds. Philosophy of Science 64 (4):314.
    Mary Hesse's well-known work on models and analogies gives models a creative role to play in science, which rests on developing certain analogical properties considered neutral between the two fields. Case study material from Irving Fisher's work (The Purchasing Power of Money, 1911), in which he used analogies to construct models of monetary relations and the monetary system, highlights certain omissions in Hesse's account. The analysis points to the importance of taking account of the negative properties in the analogies and (...)
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  18. Mary S. Morgan (1991). Conceptual Anomalies in Economics and Statistics: Lessons From the Social Experiment, Leland Gerson Neuberg. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1989, 365 Pages. [REVIEW] Economics and Philosophy 7 (02):308-.