Search results for 'Masking' (try it on Scholar)

249 found
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  1.  19
    Daniel Holender (1986). Semantic Activation Without Conscious Identification in Dichotic Listening, Parafoveal Vision, and Visual Masking: A Survey and Appraisal. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 9 (1):1-23.
    When the stored representation of the meaning of a stimulus is accessed through the processing of a sensory input it is maintained in an activated state for a certain amount of time that allows for further processing. This semantic activation is generally accompanied by conscious identification, which can be demonstrated by the ability of a person to perform discriminations on the basis of the meaning of the stimulus. The idea that a sensory input can give rise to semantic activation without (...)
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  2.  21
    Ali Jannati & Vincent Di Lollo (2012). Relative Blindsight Arises From a Criterion Confound in Metacontrast Masking: Implications for Theories of Consciousness. Consciousness and Cognition 21 (1):307-314.
    Relative blindsight is said to occur when different levels of subjective awareness are obtained at equality of objective performance. Using metacontrast masking, Lau and Passingham reported relative blindsight in normal observers at the shorter of two stimulus-onset asynchronies between target and mask. Experiment 1 replicated the critical asymmetry in subjective awareness at equality of objective performance. We argue that this asymmetry cannot be regarded as evidence for relative blindsight because the observers’ responses were based on different attributes of the (...)
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  3.  38
    Bruno G. Breitmeyer & Haluk Ögmen (2006). Visual Masking: Time Slices Through Conscious and Unconscious Vision (2nd Ed.). Oxford University Press.
    This new edition uses the technique of visual masking to explore temporal aspects of conscious and unconscious processes down to a resolution in the...
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  4.  10
    Bruno G. Breitmeyer, Tony Ro & Haluk Ogmen (2004). A Comparison of Masking by Visual and Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation: Implications for the Study of Conscious and Unconscious Visual Processing. Consciousness and Cognition 13 (4):829-843.
    Visual stimuli as well as transcranial magnetic stimulation can be used: to suppress the visibility of a target and to recover the visibility of a target that has been suppressed by another mask. Both types of stimulation thus provide useful methods for studying the microgenesis of object perception. We first review evidence of similarities between the processes by which a TMS mask and a visual mask can either suppress the visibility of targets or recover such suppressed visibility. However, (...)
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  5.  14
    Giovanni Bruno Vicario (2003). On Simultaneous Masking in the Visual Field. Axiomathes 13 (3-4):399-432.
    The concept of simultaneous masking in visual field is discussed, in the light of classical examples, of the various kinds of the phenomenon, of a modal completion, of the figure/ground phenomenon, of ambiguous and reversible figures, of mimicry and camouflage and eventually of the complexity of the stimulus. There is some reference to masking in auditory field. The “reality” of the masked configuration is discussed, drawing the conclusion that it is perceptually unreal. The fact that the masking (...)
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  6.  7
    Giovanni Bruno Vicario (2002). On Simultaneous Masking in the Visual Field. Axiomathes 13 (3/4):399-432.
    The concept of simultaneous masking in visual field is discussed, in the light of classical examples, of the various kinds of the phenomenon, of a modal completion, of the figure/ground phenomenon, of ambiguous and reversible figures, of mimicry and camouflage and eventually of the complexity of the stimulus. There is some reference to masking in auditory field. The reality of the masked configuration is discussed, drawing the conclusion that it is perceptually unreal. The fact that (...)
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  7.  73
    Stanislas Dehaene, Lionel Naccache, L. Jonathan Cohen, Denis Le Bihan, Jean-Francois Mangin, Jean-Baptiste Poline & Denis Rivière (2001). Cerebral Mechanisms of Word Masking and Unconscious Repetition Priming. Nature Neuroscience 4 (7):752-758.
  8.  3
    Daniel Kahneman (1966). Time-Intensity Reciprocity Under Various Conditions of Adaptation and Backward Masking. Journal of Experimental Psychology 71 (4):543.
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  9.  3
    Vincent Di Lollo, D. G. Lowe & J. P. Scott (1974). Backward Masking and Interference with the Processing of Brief Visual Displays. Journal of Experimental Psychology 103 (5):934.
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  10. Bertram Scharf & Kenneth Fuld (1972). Reduction of Visual Masking by a Priming Flash. Journal of Experimental Psychology 94 (1):116.
  11.  23
    Geoffrey F. Woodman & Steven J. Luck (2003). Dissociations Among Attention, Perception, and Awareness During Object-Substitution Masking. Psychological Science 14 (6):605-611.
  12.  2
    Stephanie C. Goodhew, Paul E. Dux, Ottmar V. Lipp & Troy A. W. Visser (2012). Understanding Recovery From Object Substitution Masking. Cognition 122 (3):405-415.
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  13.  1
    Michael E. Dawson (1970). Cognition and Conditioning: Effects of Masking the CS-UCS Contingency on Human GSR Classical Conditioning. Journal of Experimental Psychology 85 (3):389.
  14. Mark C. Price (2001). Now You See It, Now You Don't: Preventing Consciousness with Visual Masking. In Peter G. Grossenbacher (ed.), Finding Consciousness in the Brain: A Neurocognitive Approach. Advances in Consciousness Research. John Benjamins 25-60.
  15.  4
    Terry J. Spencer & Richard Shuntich (1970). Evidence for an Interruption Theory of Backward Masking. Journal of Experimental Psychology 85 (2):198.
  16.  4
    Stephanie C. Goodhew, Troy A. W. Visser, Ottmar V. Lipp & Paul E. Dux (2011). Implicit Semantic Perception in Object Substitution Masking. Cognition 118 (1):130-134.
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  17. Bruno G. Breitmeyer & Haluk Ögmen (2006). Visual Masking Reveals Differences Between the Nonconscious and Conscious Processing of Form and Surface Attributes. In Haluk Ögmen & Bruno G. Breitmeyer (eds.), The First Half Second: The Microgenesis and Temporal Dynamics of Unconscious and Conscious Visual Processes. MIT Press 315-333.
  18.  2
    Michael N. Nelson & Leonard E. Ross (1974). Effects of Masking Tasks on Differential Eyelid Conditioning: A Distinction Between Knowledge of Stimulus Contingencies and Attentional or Cognitive Activities Involving Them. Journal of Experimental Psychology 102 (1):1.
  19.  1
    Alan L. Stewart & Dean G. Purcell (1974). Visual Backward Masking by a Flash of Light: A Study of U-Shaped Detection Functions. Journal of Experimental Psychology 103 (3):553.
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  20.  4
    Charles W. Eriksen & Barbara A. Eriksen (1971). Visual Perceptual Processing Rates and Backward and Forward Masking. Journal of Experimental Psychology 89 (2):306.
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  21.  2
    Naomi Weisstein (1966). Backward Masking and Models of Perceptual Processing. Journal of Experimental Psychology 72 (2):232.
  22.  1
    Leonard E. Ross, M. Cecilia Ferreira & Susan M. Ross (1974). Backward Masking of Conditioned Stimuli: Effects on Differential and Single-Cue Classical Conditioning Performance. Journal of Experimental Psychology 103 (4):603.
  23.  3
    Peter H. Schiller (1965). Monoptic and Dichoptic Visual Masking by Patterns and Flashes. Journal of Experimental Psychology 69 (2):193.
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  24.  3
    Dominic W. Massaro (1973). A Comparison of Forward Versus Backward Recognition Masking. Journal of Experimental Psychology 100 (2):434.
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  25.  3
    John Hogben & Vincent Di Lollo (1972). Effects of Duration of Masking Stimulus and Dark Interval on the Detection of a Test Disk. Journal of Experimental Psychology 95 (2):245.
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  26.  3
    J. G. Ingham (1959). Variations in Cross-Masking with Frequency. Journal of Experimental Psychology 58 (3):199.
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  27.  1
    Bertram Scharf & L. A. Lefton (1970). Backward and Forward Masking as a Function of Stimulus and Task Parameters. Journal of Experimental Psychology 84 (2):331.
  28.  1
    Elizabeth Fehrer (1966). Effect of Stimulus Similarity on Retroactive Masking. Journal of Experimental Psychology 71 (4):612.
  29.  1
    George A. Gescheider & Robert K. Niblette (1967). Cross-Modality Masking for Touch and Hearing. Journal of Experimental Psychology 74 (3):313-320.
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  30.  3
    M. J. Mitchell & R. L. McBride (1971). Effects of Propanol Masking Odor on the Olfactory Intensity Scaling of Eugenol. Journal of Experimental Psychology 87 (3):309-313.
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  31.  2
    Ray Over, Jack Broerse & Boris Crassini (1972). Orientation Illusion and Masking in Central and Peripheral Vision. Journal of Experimental Psychology 96 (1):25.
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  32.  2
    Peter H. Schiller & Morton Wiener (1963). Monoptic and Dichoptic Visual Masking. Journal of Experimental Psychology 66 (4):386.
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  33.  2
    D. L. Schurman & R. L. Colegate (1970). Dark Intervals as Stimulus Events and Their Effect on Visual Masking and Time-Intensity Reciprocity. Journal of Experimental Psychology 85 (2):278.
  34.  2
    Donald H. Thor (1970). Discrimination of Succession in Visual Masking by Retarded and Normal Children. Journal of Experimental Psychology 83 (3p1):380.
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  35.  2
    Donald L. Schurman, Charles W. Eriksen & John Rohrbaugh (1968). Masking Phenomena and Time Intensity Reciprocity for Form. Journal of Experimental Psychology 78 (2p1):310.
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  36.  2
    Charles W. Eriksen & John Rohrbaugh (1970). Visual Masking in Multielement Displays. Journal of Experimental Psychology 83 (1p1):147.
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  37.  2
    Charles W. Eriksen, James F. Collins & Thomas S. Greenspon (1967). An Analysis of Certain Factors Responsible for Nonmonotonic Backward Masking Functions. Journal of Experimental Psychology 75 (4):500.
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  38. Michael F. Sherrick & William N. Dember (1970). Completeness and Spatial Distribution of Mask Contours as Factors in Visual Backward Masking. Journal of Experimental Psychology 84 (1):179.
  39.  2
    Philip M. Merikle (1974). Selective Backward Masking with an Unpredictable Mask. Journal of Experimental Psychology 103 (3):589.
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  40.  2
    M. J. Homzie (1968). Separate-Phase Differential Eyelid Conditioning Within the Context of a Masking Procedure. Journal of Experimental Psychology 76 (4p1):630.
  41.  2
    Melanie J. Mayer & Leonard E. Ross (1969). Effects of Stimulus Complexity, Interstimulus Interval, and Masking Task Conditions in Differential Eyelid Conditioning. Journal of Experimental Psychology 81 (3):469.
  42.  2
    Terry J. Spencer, Larry Hawkes & Gregory Mattson (1972). Effect of a Forward Indicator on Backward Masking. Journal of Experimental Psychology 93 (2):297.
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  43. John H. Thompson (1966). What Happens to the Stimulus in Backward Masking? Journal of Experimental Psychology 71 (4):580.
  44.  1
    Sidney Stecher (1971). Retroactive Masking Without Spatial Transients. Journal of Experimental Psychology 91 (1):34.
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  45.  1
    David R. Thomas, Marilla D. Svinicki & John G. Svinicki (1970). Masking of Stimulus Control During Generalization Testing. Journal of Experimental Psychology 84 (3):479.
  46.  1
    Terry J. Spencer (1969). Some Effects of Different Masking Stimuli on Iconic Storage. Journal of Experimental Psychology 81 (1):132.
  47.  1
    Charles W. Eriksen & James F. Collins (1965). Reinterpretation of One Form of Backward and Forward Masking in Visual Perception. Journal of Experimental Psychology 70 (4):343.
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  48.  1
    Sara Burchard & R. B. Lawson (1973). A -Shaped Detection Function for Backward Masking of Similar Contours. Journal of Experimental Psychology 99 (1):35-41.
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  49.  1
    Kevin Houlihan & Robert W. Sekuler (1968). Contour Interactions in Visual Masking. Journal of Experimental Psychology 77 (2):281.
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  50.  1
    E. Rae Harcum & Mary R. Shaw (1974). Cognitive and Sensory Lateral Masking of Tachistoscopic Patterns. Journal of Experimental Psychology 103 (4):663.
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