Search results for 'Mathematical literature' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Marlies Kronegger, Anna-Teresa Tymieniecka, World Institute for Advanced Phenomenological Research and Learning, International Society for Phenomenology and Literature & International Phenomenology Congress (1994). Allegory Old and New in Literature, Fine Art, Music and Theatre and its Continuity in Culture.
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  2. Anna-Teresa Tymieniecka & International Society for Phenomenology and Literature (1982). The Philosophical Reflection of Man in Literature Selected Papers From Several Conferences Held by the International Society for Phenomenology and Literature in Cambridge, Massachusetts.
     
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  3.  27
    National Reference Center for Bioethics Literature (2001). After BIOETHICSLINE: Online Searching of the Bioethics Literature. Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 11 (4):387-389.
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  4.  12
    National Reference Center for Bioethics Literature (2007). News From the National Reference Center for Bioethics Literature (NRCBL) and the National Information Resource on Ethics and Human Genetics (NIREHG). Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 17 (4).
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  5. Kenneth O. May (1968). Growth and Quality of the Mathematical Literature. Isis 59 (4):363-371.
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  6. G. Loria (1918). MILLER, G. A. - Historical introduction to mathematical literature. [REVIEW] Scientia 12 (23):142.
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  7.  30
    Emilia Anvarovna Taissina (2008). Philosophical Truth in Mathematical Terms and Literature Analogies. Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 53:273-278.
    The article is based upon the following starting position. In this post-modern time, it seems that no scholar in Europe supports what is called “Enlightenment Project” with its naïve objectivism and Correspondence Theory of Truth1, - though not being really hostile, just strongly skeptical about it. No old-fasioned “classical” academical texts; only His Majesty Discourse as chain of interpretations and reinterpretations. What was called objectivity “proved to be” intersubjectivity; what was called Object (in Latin and German and Russian tradition) now (...)
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  8. John Henry (1984). History of Mathematical Sciences Barbara J. Shapiro, Probability and Certainty in Seventeenth-Century England: A Study of the Relationships Between Natural Science, Religion, History, Law, and Literature. Princeton, New Jersey: Princeton University Press, 1983. Pp. X + 347. ISBN 0-691-05379-0. £26.00. [REVIEW] British Journal for the History of Science 17 (2):232.
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  9. John Hendry (1983). Mathematical Sciences J. L. Heilbron & Bruce R. Wheaton, Literature on the History of Physics in the Twentieth Century. Berkeley: University of California Office for History of Science and Technology, 1981. Pp. Xi + 485. No Price Stated. ISBN 0-918102-012-2. David De Vorkin, The History of Modern Astronomy and Astrophysics. A Selected, Annotated, Bibliography. New York: Garland Publishing, 1982. Pp. Xxvii + 434. $65.00. ISBN 0-8240-9283-X. [REVIEW] British Journal for the History of Science 16 (3):292.
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  10. Martin Levey (1970). Mathematical Terminology in Hebrew Scientific Literature of the Middle AgesGad B. Sarfatti. Isis 61 (1):135-136.
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  11. James Turner (2015). 10. “Painstaking Research Quite Equal to Mathematical Physics”: Literature, 1860–1920. In Philology: The Forgotten Origins of the Modern Humanities. Princeton University Press 254-273.
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  12.  16
    David Reed (1994). Figures of Thought: Mathematics and Mathematical Texts. Routledge.
    Figures of Thought looks at how mathematical works can be read as texts and examines their textual strategies. David Reed offers the first sustained and critical attempt to find a consistent argument or narrative thread in mathematical texts. Reed selects mathematicians from a range of historical periods and compares their approaches to organizing and arguing texts, using an extended commentary on Euclid's Elements as a central structuring framework. He develops fascinating interpretations of mathematicians' work throughout history, from Descartes (...)
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  13.  26
    Adrian Heathcote (2014). On the Exhaustion of Mathematical Entities by Structures. Axiomathes 24 (2):167-180.
    There has been considerable discussion in the literature of one kind of identity problem that mathematical structuralism faces: the automorphism problem, in which the structure is unable to individuate the mathematical entities in its domain. Shapiro (Philos Math 16(3):285–309, 2008) has partly responded to these concerns. But I argue here that the theory faces an even more serious kind of identity problem, which the theory can’t overcome staying within its remit. I give two examples to make the (...)
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  14.  1
    D. Wade Hands (2016). Derivational Robustness, Credible Substitute Systems and Mathematical Economic Models: The Case of Stability Analysis in Walrasian General Equilibrium Theory. European Journal for Philosophy of Science 6 (1):31-53.
    This paper supports the literature which argues that derivational robustness can have epistemic import in highly idealized economic models. The defense is based on a particular example from mathematical economic theory, the dynamic Walrasian general equilibrium model. It is argued that derivational robustness first increased and later decreased the credibility of the Walrasian model. The example demonstrates that derivational robustness correctly describes the practices of a particular group of influential economic theorists and provides support for the arguments of (...)
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  15.  73
    John Corcoran (2014). Review of Macbeth, D. Diagrammatic Reasoning in Frege's Begriffsschrift. Synthese 186 (2012), No. 1, 289–314. Mathematical Reviews MR 2935338. MATHEMATICAL REVIEWS 2014:2935338.
    A Mathematical Review by John Corcoran, SUNY/Buffalo -/- Macbeth, Danielle Diagrammatic reasoning in Frege's Begriffsschrift. Synthese 186 (2012), no. 1, 289–314. ABSTRACT This review begins with two quotations from the paper: its abstract and the first paragraph of the conclusion. The point of the quotations is to make clear by the “give-them-enough-rope” strategy how murky, incompetent, and badly written the paper is. I know I am asking a lot, but I have to ask you to read the quoted passages—aloud (...)
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  16.  10
    Joachim Frans & Laszlo Kosolosky (2014). Revisiting the Reliability of Published Mathematical Proofs: Where Do We Go Next? Theoria. An International Journal for Theory, History and Foundations of Science 29 (3):345.
    Mathematics seems to have a special status when compared to other areas of human knowledge. This special status is linked with the role of proof. Mathematicians all too often believe that this type of argumentation leaves no room for errors or unclarity. In this paper we take a closer look at mathematical practice, more precisely at the publication process in mathematics. We argue that the apparent view that mathematical literature is also more reliable is too naive. We (...)
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  17.  63
    Alan Baker (2012). Science-Driven Mathematical Explanation. Mind 121 (482):243-267.
    Philosophers of mathematics have become increasingly interested in the explanatory role of mathematics in empirical science, in the context of new versions of the Quinean ‘Indispensability Argument’ which employ inference to the best explanation for the existence of abstract mathematical objects. However, little attention has been paid to analysing the nature of the explanatory relation involved in these mathematical explanations in science (MES). In this paper, I attack the only articulated account of MES in the literature (an (...)
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  18.  72
    Aidan Lyon (2012). Mathematical Explanations Of Empirical Facts, And Mathematical Realism. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 90 (3):559-578.
    A main thread of the debate over mathematical realism has come down to whether mathematics does explanatory work of its own in some of our best scientific explanations of empirical facts. Realists argue that it does; anti-realists argue that it doesn't. Part of this debate depends on how mathematics might be able to do explanatory work in an explanation. Everyone agrees that it's not enough that there merely be some mathematics in the explanation. Anti-realists claim there is nothing mathematics (...)
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  19.  12
    Marcus Giaquinto, Mathematical Proofs: The Beautiful and The Explanatory.
    Mathematicians sometimes judge a mathematical proof to be beautiful and in doing so seem to be making a judgement of the same kind as aesthetic judgements of works of visual art, music or literature. Mathematical proofs are also appraised for explanatoriness: some proofs merely establish their conclusions as true, while others also show why their conclusions are true. This paper will focus on the prima facie plausible assumption that, for mathematical proofs, beauty and explanatoriness tend to (...)
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  20.  68
    A. Baker (2003). Does the Existence of Mathematical Objects Make a Difference? Australasian Journal of Philosophy 81 (2):246 – 264.
    In this paper I examine a strategy which aims to bypass the technicalities of the indispensability debate and to offer a direct route to nominalism. The starting-point for this alternative nominalist strategy is the claim that--according to the platonist picture--the existence of mathematical objects makes no difference to the concrete, physical world. My principal goal is to show that the 'Makes No Difference' (MND) Argument does not succeed in undermining platonism. The basic reason why not is that the makes-no-difference (...)
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  21.  72
    Waldyr A. Rodrigues Jr, Quintino A. G. De Souza & Yuri Bozhkov (1995). The Mathematical Structure of Newtonian Spacetime: Classical Dynamics and Gravitation. [REVIEW] Foundations of Physics 25 (6):871-924.
    We give a precise and modern mathematical characterization of the Newtonian spacetime structure (ℕ). Our formulation clarifies the concepts of absolute space, Newton's relative spaces, and absolute time. The concept of reference frames (which are “timelike” vector fields on ℕ) plays a fundamental role in our approach, and the classification of all possible reference frames on ℕ is investigated in detail. We succeed in identifying a Lorentzian structure on ℕ and we study the classical electrodynamics of Maxwell and Lorentz (...)
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  22. Robert Schwartz (1995). Is Mathematical Competence Innate? Philosophy of Science 62 (2):227-40.
    Despite a vast philosophical literature on the epistemology of mathematics and much speculation about how, in principle, knowledge of this domain is possible, little attention has been paid to the psychological findings and theories concerning the acquisition, comprehension and use of mathematical knowledge. This contrasts sharply with recent philosophical work on language where comparable issues and problems arise. One topic that is the center of debate in the study of mathematical cognition is the question of innateness. This (...)
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  23.  25
    Nabil I. Al-Najjar & Jonathan Weinstein (2009). The Ambiguity Aversion Literature: A Critical Assessment. Economics and Philosophy 25 (3):249-284.
    We provide a critical assessment of the ambiguity aversion literature, which we characterize in terms of the view that Ellsberg choices are rational responses to ambiguity, to be explained by relaxing Savage's Sure-Thing principle and adding an ambiguity-aversion postulate. First, admitting Ellsberg choices as rational leads to behaviour, such as sensitivity to irrelevant sunk cost, or aversion to information, which most economists would consider absurd or irrational. Second, we argue that the mathematical objects referred to as in the (...)
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  24.  10
    Carlo Cellucci (2008). The Nature of Mathematical Explanation. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science 39 (2):202-210.
    Although in the past three decades interest in mathematical explanation revived, recent literature on the subject seems to neglect the strict connection between explanation and discovery. In this paper I sketch an alternative approach that takes such connection into account. My approach is a revised version of one originally considered by Descartes. The main difference is that my approach is in terms of the analytic method, which is a method of discovery prior to axiomatized mathematics, whereas Descartes’s approach (...)
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  25.  10
    Kevin Davey (2003). Is Mathematical Rigor Necessary in Physics? British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 54 (3):439-463.
    Many arguments found in the physics literature involve concepts that are not well-defined by the usual standards of mathematics. I argue that physicists are entitled to employ such concepts without rigorously defining them so long as they restrict the sorts of mathematical arguments in which these concepts are involved. Restrictions of this sort allow the physicist to ignore calculations involving these concepts that might lead to contradictory results. I argue that such restrictions need not be ad-hoc, but can (...)
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  26.  22
    Johan van Benthem & David Pearce (1984). A Mathematical Characterization of Interpretation Between Theories. Studia Logica 43 (3):295-303.
    Of the various notions of reduction in the logical literature, relative interpretability in the sense of Tarskiet al. [6] appears to be the central one. In the present note, this syntactic notion is characterized semantically, through the existence of a suitable reduction functor on models. The latter mathematical condition itself suggests a natural generalization, whose syntactic equivalent turns out to be a notion of interpretability quite close to that of Ershov [1], Szczerba [5] and Gaifman [2].
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  27.  18
    Kevin Davey (2003). Is Mathematical Rigor Necessary in Physics? British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 54 (3):439-463.
    Many arguments found in the physics literature involve concepts that are not well-defined by the usual standards of mathematics. I argue that physicists are entitled to employ such concepts without rigorously defining them so long as they restrict the sorts of mathematical arguments in which these concepts are involved. Restrictions of this sort allow the physicist to ignore calculations involving these concepts that might lead to contradictory results. I argue that such restrictions need not be ad hoc, but (...)
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  28.  19
    Aldo Antonelli, Alasdair Urquhart & Richard Zach (2008). Mathematical Methods in Philosophy Editors' Introduction. Review of Symbolic Logic 1 (2):143-145.
    Mathematics and philosophy have historically enjoyed a mutually beneficial and productive relationship, as a brief review of the work of mathematician–philosophers such as Descartes, Leibniz, Bolzano, Dedekind, Frege, Brouwer, Hilbert, Gödel, and Weyl easily confirms. In the last century, it was especially mathematical logic and research in the foundations of mathematics which, to a significant extent, have been driven by philosophical motivations and carried out by technically minded philosophers. Mathematical logic continues to play an important role in contemporary (...)
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  29.  2
    Johan Van Benthem & David Pearce (1984). A Mathematical Characterization of Interpretation Between Theories. Studia Logica 43 (3):295 - 303.
    Of the various notions of reduction in the logical literature, relative interpretability in the sense of Tarski et al. [6] appears to be the central one. In the present note, this syntactic notion is characterized semantically, through the existence of a suitable reduction functor on models. The latter mathematical condition itself suggests a natural generalization, whose syntactic equivalent turns out to be a notion of interpretability quite close to that of Ershov [1], Szczerba [5] and Gaifman [2].
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  30.  2
    Charlotte Werndl, The Formulation and Justification of Mathematical Definitions Illustrated By Deterministic Chaos.
    The general theme of this article is the actual practice of how definitions are justified and formulated in mathematics. The theoretical insights of this article are based on a case study of topological definitions of chaos. After introducing this case study, I identify the three kinds of justification which are important for topological definitions of chaos: natural-world-justification, condition-justification and redundancy-justification. To my knowledge, the latter two have not been identified before. I argue that these three kinds of justification are widespread (...)
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  31.  8
    Martti Kuokkanen (1993). Structuralist Constraints and Mathematical Social Theorizing. Erkenntnis 38 (3):351 - 370.
    Several case studies and theoretical reports indicate that the structuralist concept of a constraint has a central role in the reconstruction of physical theories. It is surprising that there is, in the literature, only little theoretical discussion on the relevance of constraints for the reconstruction of social scientific theories. Almost all structuralist reconstructions of social theorizing are vacuously constrained. Consequently, constraints are methodologically irrelevant.In this paper I try to show that there really exist constraint-type assumptions in mathematical modelling (...)
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  32.  3
    A. A. Vetrov (1964). Mathematical Logic and Modern Formal Logic. Russian Studies in Philosophy 3 (1):24-33.
    In dealing with the problem of the interrelations between mathematical logic and formal logic, we must first of all make clear just what mathematical logic is. In our opinion, the concept "mathematical logic" is employed in two different senses in mathematical and logical literature. A successful approach to our problem necessitates a clear differentiation between these two senses. Therefore we shall speak hereafter not of mathematical logic in general, but of mathematical logic in (...)
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  33. Courtney Roby (2016). Technical Ekphrasis in Greek and Roman Science and Literature: The Written Machine Between Alexandria and Rome. Cambridge University Press.
    Ekphrasis is familiar as a rhetorical tool for inducing enargeia, the vivid sense that a reader or listener is actually in the presence of the objects described. This book focuses on the ekphrastic techniques used in ancient Greek and Roman literature to describe technological artifacts. Since the literary discourse on technology extended beyond technical texts, this book explores 'technical ekphrasis' in a wide range of genres, including history, poetry, and philosophy as well as mechanical, scientific, and mathematical works. (...)
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  34. G. I. Ruzavin (1964). On the Problem of the Interrelations of Modern Formal Logic and Mathematical Logic. Russian Studies in Philosophy 3 (1):34-44.
    In recent years, as a result of the extensive employment of the ideas and methods of mathematical logic in cybernetics and computer mathematics here and abroad, there has been a noticeable rise in interest in the methodological problems of this science. One of these is the problem of the relations between mathematical logic and traditional and even modern formal logic. However, when this problem is discussed in our philosophical literature it appears to us that three of its (...)
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  35.  7
    Thomas L. Saaty (1959). Mathematical Methods of Operations Research. New York, Mcgraw-Hill.
    This text is an ideal introduction for students to the basic mathematics of operations research as well as a valuable source of references to early literature ...
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  36.  69
    John Corcoran (1988). REVIEW OF 1988. Saccheri, G. Euclides Vindicatus (1733), Edited and Translated by G. B. Halsted, 2nd Ed. (1986), in Mathematical Reviews MR0862448. 88j:01013. MATHEMATICAL REVIEWS 88 (J):88j:01013.
    Girolamo Saccheri (1667--1733) was an Italian Jesuit priest, scholastic philosopher, and mathematician. He earned a permanent place in the history of mathematics by discovering and rigorously deducing an elaborate chain of consequences of an axiom-set for what is now known as hyperbolic (or Lobachevskian) plane geometry. Reviewer's remarks: (1) On two pages of this book Saccheri refers to his previous and equally original book Logica demonstrativa (Turin, 1697) to which 14 of the 16 pages of the editor's "Introduction" are devoted. (...)
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  37.  5
    Dimitri Bayuk (2002). Literature, Music, and Science in Nineteenth Century Russian Culture: Prince Odoyevskiy’s Quest for a Natural Enharmonic Scale. Science in Context 15 (2).
    Known today mostly as an author of Romantic short stories and fairy tales for children, Prince Vladimir Odoyevskiy was a distinguished thinker of his time, philosopher and bibliophile. The scope of his interests includes also history of magic arts and alchemy, German Romanticism, Church music. An attempt to understand the peculiarity of eight specific modes used in chants of Russian Orthodox Church led him to his own musical theory based upon well-known writings by Zarlino, Leibniz, Euler, Prony. He realized his (...)
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  38. Juha Saatsi (forthcoming). On the 'Indispensable Explanatory Role' of Mathematics. Mind:fzv175.
    The literature on the indispensability argument for mathematical realism often refers to the ‘indispensable explanatory role’ of mathematics. I argue that we should examine the notion of explanatory indispensability from the point of view of specific conceptions of scientific explanation. The reason is that explanatory indispensability in and of itself turns out to be insufficient for justifying the ontological conclusions at stake. To show this I introduce a distinction between different kinds of explanatory roles – some 'thick' and (...)
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  39.  68
    Kay Herrmann (1994). Jakob Friedrich Fries (1773-1843): Eine Philosophie der Exakten Wissenschaften. Tabula Rasa. Jenenser Zeitschrift Für Kritisches Denken (6).
    Jakob Friedrich Fries (1773-1843): A Philosophy of the Exact Sciences -/- Shortened version of the article of the same name in: Tabula Rasa. Jenenser magazine for critical thinking. 6th of November 1994 edition -/- 1. Biography -/- Jakob Friedrich Fries was born on the 23rd of August, 1773 in Barby on the Elbe. Because Fries' father had little time, on account of his journeying, he gave up both his sons, of whom Jakob Friedrich was the elder, to the Herrnhut Teaching (...)
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  40. Elijah Chudnoff (2014). Intuition in Mathematics. In Barbara Held & Lisa Osbeck (eds.), Rational Intuition. Cambridge University Press
    The literature on mathematics suggests that intuition plays a role in it as a ground of belief. This article explores the nature of intuition as it occurs in mathematical thinking. Section 1 suggests that intuitions should be understood by analogy with perceptions. Section 2 explains what fleshing out such an analogy requires. Section 3 discusses Kantian ways of fleshing it out. Section 4 discusses Platonist ways of fleshing it out. Section 5 sketches a proposal for resolving the main (...)
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  41.  80
    Martin Davis (ed.) (1965). The Undecidable: Basic Papers on Undecidable Propositions, Unsolvable Problems, and Computable Functions. Dover Publication.
    "A valuable collection both for original source material as well as historical formulations of current problems."-- The Review of Metaphysics "Much more than a mere collection of papers . . . a valuable addition to the literature."-- Mathematics of Computation An anthology of fundamental papers on undecidability and unsolvability by major figures in the field, this classic reference opens with Godel's landmark 1931 paper demonstrating that systems of logic cannot admit proofs of all true assertions of arithmetic. Subsequent papers (...)
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  42.  26
    Lorenzo Carlucci & John Case (2013). On the Necessity of U-Shaped Learning. Topics in Cognitive Science 5 (1):56-88.
    A U-shaped curve in a cognitive-developmental trajectory refers to a three-step process: good performance followed by bad performance followed by good performance once again. U-shaped curves have been observed in a wide variety of cognitive-developmental and learning contexts. U-shaped learning seems to contradict the idea that learning is a monotonic, cumulative process and thus constitutes a challenge for competing theories of cognitive development and learning. U-shaped behavior in language learning (in particular in learning English past tense) has become a central (...)
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  43.  21
    A. C. Paseau (forthcoming). A Measure of Inferential-Role Preservation. Synthese:1-22.
    The point of formalisation is to model various aspects of natural language. Perhaps the main use to which formalisation is put is to model and explain inferential relations between different sentences. Judged solely by this objective, a formalisation is successful in modelling the inferential network of natural language sentences to the extent that it mirrors this network. There is surprisingly little literature on the criteria of good formalisation, and even less on the question of what it is for a (...)
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  44.  19
    Eric W. Stein & Norita Ahmad (2009). Using the Analytical Hierarchy Process (Ahp) to Construct a Measure of the Magnitude of Consequences Component of Moral Intensity. Journal of Business Ethics 89 (3):391 - 407.
    The purpose of this work is to elaborate an empirically grounded mathematical model of the magnitude of consequences component of “moral intensity” (Jones, Academy of Management Review 16 (2),366, 1991) that can be used to evaluate different ethical situations. The model is built using the analytical hierarchy process (AHP) (Saaty, The Analytic Hierarchy Process , 1980) and empirical data from the legal profession. One contribution of our work is that it illustrates how AHP can be applied in the field (...)
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  45.  10
    Gerard R. Renardel de Lavalette (1984). Descriptions in Mathematical Logic. Studia Logica 43 (3):281-294.
    After a discussion of the different treatments in the literature of vacuous descriptions, the notion of descriptor is slightly generalized to function descriptor , so as to form partial functions which satisfy . We use (intuitionistic, classical or intermediate) logic with existence predicate, as introduced by D. S. Scott, to handle partial functions, and prove that adding function descriptors to a theory based on such a logic is conservative. For theories with quantification over functions, the situation is different: there (...)
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  46.  4
    Üner Tan (1996). We Are Far From Understanding Sex-Related Differences in Spatial-Mathematical Abilities Despite the Theory of Sexual Selection. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 19 (2):264.
    I have provided evidence that Geary's model does not explain male dominance in spatial abilities by sexual selection. The current literature concerning the relations of nonverbal IQ to testosterone, hand preference, and right- and left-hand skill, as well as the organizing effects of testosterone on cerebral lateralization during the perinatal period, does not support Geary's arguments.
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  47.  2
    Gerard R. Renardel De Lavalette (1984). Descriptions in Mathematical Logic. Studia Logica 43 (3):281 - 294.
    After a discussion of the different treatments in the literature of vacuous descriptions, the notion of descriptor is slightly generalized to function descriptor Ⅎ $\overset \rightarrow \to{y}(x)$ , so as to form partial functions φ = Ⅎ $y(\overset \rightarrow \to{x}).A(\overset \rightarrow \to{x},y)$ which satisfy $\forall \overset \rightarrow \to{x}z(z=\phi \overset \rightarrow \to{x}\leftrightarrow \forall y(A(\overset \rightarrow \to{x},y)\leftrightarrow y=z))$ . We use (intuitionistic, classical or intermediate) logic with existence predicate, as introduced by D. S. Scott, to handle partial functions, and prove that (...)
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  48.  11
    John Corcoran (1978-9). CORCORAN's THUMBNAIL REVIEWS OF OPPOSING PHILOSOPHY OF LOGIC BOOKS. MATHEMATICAL REVIEWS 56:98-9.
    PUTNAM has made highly regarded contributions to mathematics, to philosophy of logic and to philosophy of science, and in this book he brings his ideas in these three areas to bear on the traditional philosophic problem of materialism versus (objective) idealism. The book assumes that contemporary science (mathematical and physical) is largely correct as far as it goes, or at least that it is rational to believe in it. The main thesis of the book is that consistent acceptance of (...)
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  49.  20
    Tony Lévy (2003). Arabic Algebra in Hebrew Texts (1). An Unpublished Work by Isaac Ben Salomon Al-a[Hudot]Dab (14th Century). Arabic Sciences and Philosophy 13 (2):269-301.
    It has long been considered that Arabic algebra scarcely left any traces in mathematical literature of Hebrew expression. Thanks to the unpublished sources we have discovered, and to an attentive examination of already-known texts, one can no longer subscribe to such a judgement. The evidence we examine in this first article sheds light on the circulation, in erudite Jewish circles, of Arabic algebraic knowledge in Spain, Italy, Provence, and Sicily, between the 12th and the 14th centuries. The Epistle (...)
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  50.  11
    Paul Rusnock (2007). Review of A. Behboud, Bolzanos Beiträge Zur Mathematik Und Ihrer Philosophie [Bolzano's Contributions to Mathematics and its Philosophy]. [REVIEW] Philosophia Mathematica 15 (2):238-244.
    Bernard Bolzano of Prague was one of the few thinkers of his time who combined real talent in mathematics and philosophy. He was especially drawn to the common ground between these fields, interested in questions of method and what would today be called foundations . Interestingly, he was neither a professional mathematician nor a professional philosopher. As a young man, he had decided that his first priority must be to work for the reform and improvement of society. This led him, (...)
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