Search results for 'Mathematical physics' (try it on Scholar)

1000+ found
Sort by:
  1. Franfoise Monnoyeur Broitman (2013). The Indefinite within Descartes' Mathematical Physics. Eidos 19 (19):107-122.score: 240.0
    Descartes' philosophy contains an intriguing notion of the infinite, a concept labeled by the philosopher as indefinite. Even though Descartes clearly defined this term on several occasions in the correspondence with his contemporaries, as well as in his Principles of Philosophy, numerous problems about its meaning have arisen over the years. Most commentators reject the view that the indefinite could mean a real thing and, instead, identify it with an Aristotelian potential infinite. In the first part of this article, I (...)
    No categories
    Translate to English
    | Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. M. Friedman (2003). Transcendental Philosophy and Mathematical Physics. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 34 (1):29-43.score: 180.0
    This paper explores the relationship between Kant's views on the metaphysical foundations of Newtonian mathematical physics and his more general transcendental philosophy articulated in the Critique of Pure Reason. I argue that the relationship between the two positions is very close indeed and, in particular, that taking this relationship seriously can shed new light on the structure of the transcendental deduction of the categories as expounded in the second edition of the Critique.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. Michael Liston (1993). Reliability in Mathematical Physics. Philosophy of Science 60 (1):1-21.score: 180.0
    In this paper I argue three things: (1) that the interactionist view underlying Benacerraf's (1973) challenge to mathematical beliefs renders inexplicable the reliability of most of our beliefs in physics; (2) that examples from mathematical physics suggest that we should view reliability differently; and (3) that abstract mathematical considerations are indispensable to explanations of the reliability of our beliefs.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. Masaki Hrada (2008). Revision of Phenomenology for Mathematical Physics. Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 43:73-80.score: 180.0
    Fundamental notions Husserl introduced in Ideen I, such as epochè, reality, and empty X as substrate, might be useful for elucidating how mathematical physics concepts are produced. However, this is obscured in the context of Husserl’s phenomenology itself. For this possibility, the author modifies Husserl’s fundamental notions introduced for pure phenomenology, which found all sciences on the absolute Ego. Subsequently, the author displaces Husserl's phenomenological notions toward the notions operating inside scientific activities themselves and shows this using a (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. Cheng-Shi Liu (2011). Trial Equation Method Based on Symmetry and Applications to Nonlinear Equations Arising in Mathematical Physics. Foundations of Physics 41 (5):793-804.score: 158.0
    To find exact traveling wave solutions to nonlinear evolution equations, we propose a method combining symmetry properties with trial polynomial solution to nonlinear ordinary differential equations. By the method, we obtain some exact traveling wave solutions to the Burgers-KdV equations and a kind of reaction-diffusion equations with high order nonlinear terms. As a result, we prove that the Burgers-KdV equation does not have the real solution in the form a 0+a 1tan ξ+a 2tan 2 ξ, which indicates that some types (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  6. Robert E. Var (1975). On a New Mathematical Framework for Fundamental Theoretical Physics. Foundations of Physics 5 (3):407-431.score: 156.0
    It is shown by means of general principles and specific examples that, contrary to a long-standing misconception, the modern mathematical physics of compressible fluid dynamics provides a generally consistent and efficient language for describing many seemingly fundamental physical phenomena. It is shown to be appropriate for describing electric and gravitational force fields, the quantized structure of charged elementary particles, the speed of light propagation, relativistic phenomena, the inertia of matter, the expansion of the universe, and the physical nature (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  7. Dm Greenberger (1991). 2nd Workshop on Clifford Algebras and Their Applications in Mathematical Physics. Foundations of Physics 21 (6):735-752.score: 156.0
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  8. Alasdair Urquhart (2008). Philosophical Relevance of the Interaction Between Mathematical Physics and Pure Mathematics. In Paolo Mancosu (ed.), The Philosophy of Mathematical Practice. Oup Oxford.score: 156.0
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  9. Brent Mundy (1990). Mathematical Physics and Elementary Logic. PSA: Proceedings of the Biennial Meeting of the Philosophy of Science Association 1990:289 - 301.score: 152.0
    I outline an intrinsic (coordinate-free) formulation of classical particle mechanics, making no use of set theory or second-order logic. Physical quantities are accepted as real, but are constrained only by elementary axioms. This contrasts with the formulations of Field and Burgess, in which space-time regions are accepted as real and are assumed to satisfy second-order comprehension axioms. The present formulation is both logically simpler and physically more realistic. The theory is finitely axiomatizable, elementary, and even quantifier-free, but is provably empirically (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  10. Trish Glazebrook (2001). Zeno Against Mathematical Physics. Journal of the History of Ideas 62 (2):193-210.score: 150.0
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  11. C. A. Hooker (1973). Book Review:The Logical Structure of Mathematical Physics Joseph D. Sneed. [REVIEW] Philosophy of Science 40 (1):130-.score: 150.0
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  12. J. Agassi (2008). Book Review: Warwick, Andrew. (2003). Masters of Theory: Cambridge and the Rise of Mathematical Physics. Chicago and London: Chicago University Press. [REVIEW] Philosophy of the Social Sciences 38 (1):150-161.score: 150.0
  13. Henri Poincaré (1905). The Principles of Mathematical Physics. The Monist 15 (1):1-24.score: 150.0
    No categories
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  14. Yvon Gauthier (1985). The Logical Analysis of Mathematical Physics. Journal for General Philosophy of Science 16 (2):251-260.score: 150.0
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  15. D. N. Hoover (1990). Albeverio Sergio, Fenstad Jens Erik, HØEgh-Krohn Raphael, and Lindstrom Tom. Nonstandard Methods in Stochastic Analysis and Mathematical Physics. Pure and Applied Mathematics, Vol. 122. Academic Press, Orlando Etc. 1986, Xi+ 514 Pp. [REVIEW] Journal of Symbolic Logic 55 (1):362-363.score: 150.0
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  16. Philip E. B. Jourdain (1908). On Some Points in the Foundation of Mathematical Physics. The Monist 18 (2):217-226.score: 150.0
    No categories
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  17. Philip E. B. Jourdain (1915). The Purely Ordinal Conceptions of Mathematics and Their Significance for Mathematical Physics. The Monist 25 (1):140-144.score: 150.0
  18. Vincent E. Smith (1964). Mathematical Physics in Theory and Practice. Proceedings of the American Catholic Philosophical Association 38:74-85.score: 150.0
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  19. Henri Poincaré (1902). Relations Between Experimental Physics and Mathematical Physics. The Monist 12 (4):516-543.score: 150.0
    No categories
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  20. M. Anthony Brown (1956). William Heytesbury, Medieval Logic and the Rise of Mathematical Physics (Review). Franciscan Studies 16 (4):410-411.score: 150.0
  21. J. L. Destouches (1965). General Mathematical Physics and Schemas, Application to the Theory of Particles. Dialectica 19 (3‐4):345-348.score: 150.0
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  22. R. Eiten (1938). A Rational Basis for Mathematical Physics. Thought 13 (3):416-432.score: 150.0
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  23. Daniel Garber (2000). A Different Descartes: Descartes and the Programme for a Mathematical Physics in His Correspondence. In John Schuster, Stephen Gaukroger & John Sutton (eds.), Descartes' Natural Philosophy. Routledge. 113--130.score: 150.0
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  24. Richard J. Greechie, Dick Greechie & Stanley P. Gudder (1973). And Formal Semantics. He has Published Books as Well as Articles in Both Fields. His Work on Logic Led Him to Investigate Logical Struc-Tures Arising in Mathematical Physics. Edward Gerjuoy Professor Edward Gerjuoy BS (Physics, City College of the City. In. [REVIEW] In C. A. Hooker (ed.), Contemporary Research in the Foundations and Philosophy of Quantum Theory. Boston,D. Reidel. 2.score: 150.0
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  25. Michał Heller (1983). Wśród książek [recenzja] R.D. Richtmayer, Principles of Advanced Mathematical Physics, 1981. L. Wittgenstein, Remarques sur les fondements des mathématiques, red.: G. E. M. Anscombe, R. Thees, G. H. von Wright, 1983. W. Szlenk, Wstęp do teorii gładkic. [REVIEW] Zagadnienia Filozoficzne W Nauce 5.score: 150.0
    No categories
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  26. A. George Molland (1989). Aristotelian Holism and Medieval Mathematical Physics. In Stefano Caroti (ed.), Studies in Medieval Natural Philosophy. L.S. Olschki. 1--227.score: 150.0
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  27. Paul J. Nahin (2009). Mrs. Perkins's Electric Quilt: And Other Intriguing Stories of Mathematical Physics. Princeton University Press.score: 150.0
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  28. Curtis Wilson (1956). William Heytesbury: Medieval Logic and the Rise of Mathematical Physics. University of Wisconsin Press.score: 150.0
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  29. Victor J. Stenger (2006). A Scenario for a Natural Origin of Our Universe Using a Mathematical Model Based on Established Physics and Cosmology. Philo 9 (2):93-102.score: 144.0
    A mathematical model of the natural origin of our universe is presented. The model is based only on well-established physics. No claim is made that this model uniquely represents exactly how the universe came about. But the viability of a single model serves to refute any assertions that the universe cannot have come about by natural means.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  30. Kevin Davey (2003). Is Mathematical Rigor Necessary in Physics? British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 54 (3):439-463.score: 144.0
    Many arguments found in the physics literature involve concepts that are not well-defined by the usual standards of mathematics. I argue that physicists are entitled to employ such concepts without rigorously defining them so long as they restrict the sorts of mathematical arguments in which these concepts are involved. Restrictions of this sort allow the physicist to ignore calculations involving these concepts that might lead to contradictory results. I argue that such restrictions need not be ad hoc, but (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  31. Nancy Cartwright (1984). Causation in Physics: Causal Processes and Mathematical Derivations. PSA: Proceedings of the Biennial Meeting of the Philosophy of Science Association 1984:391 - 404.score: 144.0
    Causal claims in physics may have two familiar kinds of support: theoretical and experimental. This paper claims that a rigorous mathematical derivation in a realistic model is necessary, though not sufficient, for full theoretical support. The support is not provided by the derivation itself; but rather it comes from a detailed back-tracing through the derivation, matching the mathematical dependencies, point by point, with details of the causal story. This back-tracing is not enough to pick out the correct (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  32. Arkady Plotnitsky (2011). On the Reasonable and Unreasonable Effectiveness of Mathematics in Classical and Quantum Physics. Foundations of Physics 41 (3):466-491.score: 138.0
    The point of departure for this article is Werner Heisenberg’s remark, made in 1929: “It is not surprising that our language [or conceptuality] should be incapable of describing processes occurring within atoms, for … it was invented to describe the experiences of daily life, and these consist only of processes involving exceedingly large numbers of atoms. … Fortunately, mathematics is not subject to this limitation, and it has been possible to invent a mathematical scheme—the quantum theory [quantum mechanics]—which seems (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  33. Jacintho Del Vecchio Junior, When Mathematics Touches Physics: Henri Poincaré on Probability.score: 132.0
    Probability plays a crucial role regarding the understanding of the relationship which exists between mathematics and physics. It will be the point of departure of this brief reflection concerning this subject, as well as about the placement of Poincaré’s thought in the scenario offered by some contemporary perspectives.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  34. Laszlo E. Szabo, How Can Physics Account for Mathematical Truth?score: 132.0
    If physicalism is true, everything is physical. In other words, everything supervenes on, or is necessitated by, the physical. Accordingly, if there are logical/mathematical facts, they must be necessitated by the physical facts of the world. In this paper, I will sketch the first steps of a physicalist philosophy of mathematics; that is, how physicalism can account for logical and mathematical facts. We will proceed as follows. First we will clarify what logical/mathematical facts actually are. Then, we (...)
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  35. Axel Gelfert (2005). Mathematical Rigor in Physics: Putting Exact Results in Their Place. Philosophy of Science 72 (5):723-738.score: 126.0
    The present paper examines the role of exact results in the theory of many‐body physics, and specifically the example of the Mermin‐Wagner theorem, a rigorous result concerning the absence of phase transitions in low‐dimensional systems. While the theorem has been shown to hold for a wide range of many‐body models, it is frequently ‘violated’ by results derived from the same models using numerical techniques. This raises the question of how scientists regulate their theoretical commitments in such cases, given that (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  36. Mark Steiner (1992). Mathematical Rigor in Physics. In Michael Detlefsen (ed.), Proof and Knowledge in Mathematics. Routledge. 158.score: 122.0
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  37. Andrew G. Pikler (1954). Utility Theories in Field Physics and Mathematical Economics (I). British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 5 (17):47-58.score: 120.0
    Direct download (10 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  38. Kurt Smith (2003). Was Descartes's Physics Mathematical? History of Philosophy Quarterly 20 (3):245 - 256.score: 120.0
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  39. Diego Rasskin-Gutman (2007). The Power of Mathematical Modeling in Developmental Biology: Biological Physics of the Developing Embryo Gabor Forgacs and Stuart A. Newman Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2005 (337 Pp; $ 64 Hbk; ISBN 0-521-78337-2). [REVIEW] Biological Theory 2 (1):108-111.score: 120.0
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  40. Ian Mueller (2004). Remarks on Physics and Mathematical Astronomy and Optics in Epicurus, Sextus Empiricus, and Some Stoics. Apeiron 37 (4):57 - 87.score: 120.0
  41. Andrew G. Pikler (1955). Utility Theories in Field Physics and Mathematical Economics (II). British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 5 (20):303-318.score: 120.0
    Direct download (10 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  42. John D. Barrow (2000). Mathematical Jujitsu: Some Informal Thoughts About G�Del and Physics. Complexity 5 (5):28-34.score: 120.0
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  43. Carroll F. Blakemore (1980). Modern Mathematical Techniques in Theoretical Physics. In. In A. R. Marlow (ed.), Quantum Theory and Gravitation. Academic Press. 1--233.score: 120.0
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  44. Oliver Aberth (1991). Pour-El Marian B. And Richards J. Ian. Computability in Analysis and Physics. Perspectives in Mathematical Logic. Springer-Verlag, Berlin, Heidelberg, New York, Etc., 1989, Xi+ 206 Pp. [REVIEW] Journal of Symbolic Logic 56 (2):749-750.score: 120.0
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  45. Alonzo Church (1955). Review: U. Farinelli, A. Gamba, Physics and Mathematical Logic. [REVIEW] Journal of Symbolic Logic 20 (3):285-285.score: 120.0
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  46. Ileana Maria Greca & Marco Antonio Moreira (2002). Mental, Physical, and Mathematical Models in the Teaching and Learning of Physics. Science Education 86 (1):106-121.score: 120.0
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  47. Paul Benioff (2002). Towards a Coherent Theory of Physics and Mathematics. Foundations of Physics 32 (7):989-1029.score: 114.0
    As an approach to a Theory of Everything a framework for developing a coherent theory of mathematics and physics together is described. The main characteristic of such a theory is discussed: the theory must be valid and and sufficiently strong, and it must maximally describe its own validity and sufficient strength. The mathematical logical definition of validity is used, and sufficient strength is seen to be a necessary and useful concept. The requirement of maximal description of its own (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  48. R. Badii (1997). Complexity: Hierarchical Structures and Scaling in Physics. Cambridge University Press.score: 114.0
    This is a comprehensive discussion of complexity as it arises in physical, chemical, and biological systems, as well as in mathematical models of nature. Common features of these apparently unrelated fields are emphasised and incorporated into a uniform mathematical description, with the support of a large number of detailed examples and illustrations. The quantitative study of complexity is a rapidly developing subject with special impact in the fields of physics, mathematics, information science, and biology. Because of the (...)
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  49. Gilbert B. Côté (2013). Mathematical Platonism and the Nature of Infinity. Open Journal of Philosophy 3 (3):372-375.score: 102.0
    An analysis of the counter-intuitive properties of infinity as understood differently in mathematics, classical physics and quantum physics allows the consideration of various paradoxes under a new light (e.g. Zeno’s dichotomy, Torricelli’s trumpet, and the weirdness of quantum physics). It provides strong support for the reality of abstractness and mathematical Platonism, and a plausible reason why there is something rather than nothing in the concrete universe. The conclusions are far reaching for science and philosophy.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
1 — 50 / 1000