Search results for 'Mathematical physics History' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Franfoise Monnoyeur Broitman (2013). The Indefinite within Descartes' Mathematical Physics. Eidos 19 (19):107-122.score: 84.0
    Descartes' philosophy contains an intriguing notion of the infinite, a concept labeled by the philosopher as indefinite. Even though Descartes clearly defined this term on several occasions in the correspondence with his contemporaries, as well as in his Principles of Philosophy, numerous problems about its meaning have arisen over the years. Most commentators reject the view that the indefinite could mean a real thing and, instead, identify it with an Aristotelian potential infinite. In the first part of this article, I (...)
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  2. C. W. Kilmister (1994/2005). Eddington's Search for a Fundamental Theory: A Key to the Universe. Cambridge University Press.score: 77.0
    Sir Arthur Eddington, the celebrated astrophysicist, made great strides towards his own 'theory of everything'in his last two books published in 1936 and 1946. Unlike his earlier lucid and authoritative works, these are strangely tentative and obscure - as if he were nervous of the significant advances that he might be making. This volume examines both how Eddington came to write these uncharacteristic books - in the context of the physics and history of the day - and what (...)
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  3. I. Grattan-Guinness (ed.) (1994). Companion Encyclopedia of the History and Philosophy of the Mathematical Sciences. Routledge.score: 77.0
    The Companion Encyclopedia is the first comprehensive work to cover all the principal lines and themes of the history and philosophy of mathematics from ancient times up to the twentieth century. In 176 articles contributed by 160 authors of 18 nationalities, the work describes and analyzes the variety of theories, proofs, techniques, and cultural and practical applications of mathematics. The work's aim is to recover our mathematical heritage and show the importance of mathematics today by treating its interactions (...)
     
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  4. J. L. Heilbron (ed.) (2005). The Oxford Guide to the History of Physics and Astronomy. Oxford University Press.score: 76.0
    With over 150 alphabetically arranged entries about key scientists, concepts, discoveries, technological innovations, and learned institutions, the Oxford Guide to Physics and Astronomy traces the history of physics and astronomy from the Renaissance to the present. For students, teachers, historians, scientists, and readers of popular science books such as Galileo's Daughter, this guide deciphers the methods and philosophies of physics and astronomy as well as the historical periods from which they emerged. Meant to serve the lay (...)
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  5. Mary B. Hesse (1961/2005). Forces and Fields: The Concept of Action at a Distance in the History of Physics. Dover Publications.score: 76.0
    This history of physics focuses on the question, "How do bodies act on one another across space?" The variety of answers illustrates the function of fundamental analogies or models in physics as well as the role of so-called unobservable entities. Forces and Fields presents an in-depth look at the science of ancient Greece, and it examines the influence of antique philosophy on seventeenth-century thought. Additional topics embrace many elements of modern physics--the empirical basis of quantum mechanics, (...)
     
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  6. Roger G. Newton (2007). From Clockwork to Crapshoot: A History of Physics. Belknap Press of Harvard University Press.score: 67.0
    From Clockwork to Crapshoot provides the perspective needed to understand contemporary developments in physics in relation to philosophical traditions as far ...
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  7. Jed Z. Buchwald & Robert Fox (eds.) (2013). The Oxford Handbook of the History of Physics. Oxford University Press.score: 67.0
    part. I. Physics and the new science -- part. II. The long eighteenth century -- part III. Fashioning the discipline : from natural philosophy to physics -- part IV. Modern physics.
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  8. Thomas Ryckman (2012). What Does History Matter to Philosophy of Physics? Journal of the Philosophy of History 5 (3):496-512.score: 66.0
    Abstract Naturalized metaphysics remains a default presupposition of much contemporary philosophy of physics. As metaphysics is supposed to be about the general structure of reality, so a naturalized metaphysics draws upon our best physical theories: Assuming the truth of such a theory, it attempts to answer the “foundational question par excellence “, “how could the world possibly be the way this theory says it is?“ It is argued that attention to historical detail in the development and formulation of physical (...)
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  9. Bryan W. Roberts (2011). How Galileo Dropped the Ball and Fermat Picked It Up. Synthese 180 (3):337-356.score: 65.0
    This paper introduces a little-known episode in the history of physics, in which a mathematical proof by Pierre Fermat vindicated Galileo’s characterization of freefall. The first part of the paper reviews the historical context leading up to Fermat’s proof. The second part illustrates how a physical and a mathematical insight enabled Fermat’s result, and that a simple modification would satisfy any of Fermat’s critics. The result is an illustration of how a purely theoretical argument can settle (...)
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  10. J. D. Bernal (1972). The Extension of Man: A History of Physics Before the Quantum. Cambridge,M.I.T. Press.score: 64.0
  11. Anton Z. Capri (2007). From Quanta to Quarks: More Anecdotal History of Physics. World Scientific.score: 64.0
    Chapter Prologue “The scientific theory I like the best is that the rings of Saturn are composed entirely of lost airline baggage.” Max Born Ever since, ...
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  12. J. D. Bernal (1972). The Extension of Man: A History of Physics Before 1900. London,Weidenfeld and Nicolson.score: 64.0
  13. Harry Fawcett Buckley (1927). A Short History of Physics. London, Methuen & Co. Ltd..score: 64.0
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  14. Howard T. Milhorn (2008). The History of Physics: A Biographical Approach. Virtualbookworm.Com Pub..score: 64.0
     
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  15. Anne Rooney (2013). The History of Physics. Rosen Pub..score: 64.0
     
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  16. Max Jammer (1993). Concepts of Space: The History of Theories of Space in Physics. Dover Publications.score: 60.0
    Newly updated study surveys concept of space from standpoint of historical development. Space in antiquity, Judeo-Christian ideas about space, Newton’s concept of absolute space, space from 18th century to present. Extensive new chapter (6) reviews changes in philosophy of space since publication of second edition (1969). Numerous original quotations and bibliographical references. "...admirably compact and swiftly paced style."—Philosophy of Science. Foreword by Albert Einstein. Bibliography.
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  17. Hermann Bondi, Wolfgang Yourgrau & Allen duPont Breck (eds.) (1970). Physics, Logic, and History. New York,Plenum Press.score: 60.0
  18. Mario Castellana (2004). Razionalismi Senza Dogmi: Per Una Epistemologia Della Fisica-Matematica. Rubbettino.score: 60.0
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  19. Stanisław J. Surma (ed.) (1973). Studies in the History of Mathematical Logic. Wrocław,Zakład Narodowy Im. Ossolinskich.score: 60.0
  20. M. Friedman (2003). Transcendental Philosophy and Mathematical Physics. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 34 (1):29-43.score: 59.0
    This paper explores the relationship between Kant's views on the metaphysical foundations of Newtonian mathematical physics and his more general transcendental philosophy articulated in the Critique of Pure Reason. I argue that the relationship between the two positions is very close indeed and, in particular, that taking this relationship seriously can shed new light on the structure of the transcendental deduction of the categories as expounded in the second edition of the Critique.
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  21. Emile Borel (1952). L'imaginaire Et Le Réel En Mathématiques Et En Physique. Paris, A. Michel.score: 58.0
     
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  22. Leonid Grinin (2007). Production Revolutions and Periodization of History: A Comparative and Theoretic-Mathematical Approach. Social Evolution and History 6 (2).score: 57.0
    There is no doubt that periodization is a rather effective method of data ordering and analysis, but it deals with exceptionally complex types of processual and temporal phenomena and thus it simplifies historical reality. Many scholars emphasize the great importance of periodization for the study of history. In fact, any periodization suffers from one-sidedness and certain deviations from reality. However, the number and significance of such deviations can be radically diminished as the effectiveness of periodization is directly connected with (...)
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  23. Arkady Plotnitsky (2011). On the Reasonable and Unreasonable Effectiveness of Mathematics in Classical and Quantum Physics. Foundations of Physics 41 (3):466-491.score: 57.0
    The point of departure for this article is Werner Heisenberg’s remark, made in 1929: “It is not surprising that our language [or conceptuality] should be incapable of describing processes occurring within atoms, for … it was invented to describe the experiences of daily life, and these consist only of processes involving exceedingly large numbers of atoms. … Fortunately, mathematics is not subject to this limitation, and it has been possible to invent a mathematical scheme—the quantum theory [quantum mechanics]—which seems (...)
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  24. Michael Liston (1993). Reliability in Mathematical Physics. Philosophy of Science 60 (1):1-21.score: 56.0
    In this paper I argue three things: (1) that the interactionist view underlying Benacerraf's (1973) challenge to mathematical beliefs renders inexplicable the reliability of most of our beliefs in physics; (2) that examples from mathematical physics suggest that we should view reliability differently; and (3) that abstract mathematical considerations are indispensable to explanations of the reliability of our beliefs.
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  25. Masaki Hrada (2008). Revision of Phenomenology for Mathematical Physics. Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 43:73-80.score: 56.0
    Fundamental notions Husserl introduced in Ideen I, such as epochè, reality, and empty X as substrate, might be useful for elucidating how mathematical physics concepts are produced. However, this is obscured in the context of Husserl’s phenomenology itself. For this possibility, the author modifies Husserl’s fundamental notions introduced for pure phenomenology, which found all sciences on the absolute Ego. Subsequently, the author displaces Husserl's phenomenological notions toward the notions operating inside scientific activities themselves and shows this using a (...)
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  26. Elaine Maria Paiva de Andrade, Jean Faber & Luiz Pinguelli Rosa (2013). A Spontaneous Physics Philosophy on the Concept of Ether Throughout the History of Science: Birth, Death and Revival. [REVIEW] Foundations of Science 18 (3):559-577.score: 54.0
    In the course of the history of science, some concepts have forged theoretical foundations, constituting paradigms that hold sway for substantial periods of time. Research on the history of explanations of the action of one body on another is a testament to the periodic revival of one theory in particular, namely, the theory of ether. Even after the foundation of modern Physics, the notion of ether has directly and indirectly withstood the test of time. Through a spontaneous (...)
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  27. Robert E. Var (1975). On a New Mathematical Framework for Fundamental Theoretical Physics. Foundations of Physics 5 (3):407-431.score: 53.0
    It is shown by means of general principles and specific examples that, contrary to a long-standing misconception, the modern mathematical physics of compressible fluid dynamics provides a generally consistent and efficient language for describing many seemingly fundamental physical phenomena. It is shown to be appropriate for describing electric and gravitational force fields, the quantized structure of charged elementary particles, the speed of light propagation, relativistic phenomena, the inertia of matter, the expansion of the universe, and the physical nature (...)
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  28. James Robert Brown (1998). Québec Studies in the Philosophy of Science Part 1: Logic, Mathematics, Physics and History of Science Part 2: Biology, Psychology, Cognitive Science and Economics Boston Studies in the Philosophy of Science, Vols. 177 and 178 Mathieu Marion and Robert S. Cohen, Editors Dordrecht: Kluwer Academic Publisher, 1995–96, Vol. 1: Xi + 320 Pp., $180; Vol. 2: Xi +303 Pp., $154. [REVIEW] Dialogue 37 (03):620-.score: 53.0
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  29. Herbert Dingle (1941). Science Since 1500: A Short History of Mathematics, Physics, Chemistry, Biology. By H. T. Pledge (London: H.M. Stationery Office. 1939. Pp. 357. With Plates, Diagrams, and Maps. Price 7s. 6d. Net.). [REVIEW] Philosophy 16 (63):321-.score: 53.0
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  30. Arthur E. Falk (1997). Mathieu Marion and Robert S. Cohen, Eds., Québec Studies in the Philosophy of Science. Part I: Logic, Mathematics, Physics, and History of Science. Essays in Honor of Hugues Leblanc Reviewed By. [REVIEW] Philosophy in Review 17 (1):50-51.score: 53.0
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  31. Jacintho Del Vecchio Junior, When Mathematics Touches Physics: Henri Poincaré on Probability.score: 52.0
    Probability plays a crucial role regarding the understanding of the relationship which exists between mathematics and physics. It will be the point of departure of this brief reflection concerning this subject, as well as about the placement of Poincaré’s thought in the scenario offered by some contemporary perspectives.
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  32. Ivor Bulmer-Thomas (1991). Apollonius From the Arabic G. J. Toomer (Ed.): Apollonius, Conies, Books V to VII. The Arabic Translation of the Lost Greek Original in the Version of the Banū Mūsā. (Sources in the History of Mathematics and Physical Sciences, 9.) 2 Vols. Vol. I: Pp. Xcv + 547; Vol. II: Pp. 341; 288 Mathematical Figures. New York, Berlin, Heidelberg, London, Paris, Tokyo and Hong Kong: Springer Verlag, 1990. £85 for the 2 Vols. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 41 (02):313-314.score: 51.0
  33. Christa Binder (2012). The Geometry of an Art, The History of the Mathematical Theory of Perspective From Alberti to Monge. Sources and Studies in the History of Mathematics and Physical Sciences. Annals of Science 69 (2):291-294.score: 51.0
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  34. Thomas Ryckman (2005). The Reign of Relativity: Philosophy in Physics, 1915-1925. Oxford University Press.score: 49.0
    Universally recognized as bringing about a revolutionary transformation of the notions of space, time, and motion in physics, Einstein's theory of gravitation, known as "general relativity," was also a defining event for 20th century philosophy of science. During the decisive first ten years of the theory's existence, two main tendencies dominated its philosophical reception. This book is an extended argument that the path actually taken, which became logical empiricist philosophy of science, greatly contributed to the current impasse over realism, (...)
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  35. Jed Z. Buchwald (ed.) (1995). Scientific Practice: Theories and Stories of Doing Physics. The University of Chicago Press.score: 49.0
    Most recent work on the nature of experiment in physics has focused on "big science"--the large-scale research addressed in Andrew Pickering's Constructing Quarks and Peter Galison's How Experiments End. This book examines small-scale experiment in physics, in particular the relation between theory and practice. The contributors focus on interactions among the people, materials, and ideas involved in experiments--factors that have been relatively neglected in science studies. The first half of the book is primarily philosophical, with contributions from (...)
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  36. Bart Van Kerkhove (ed.) (2009). New Perspectives on Mathematical Practices: Essays in Philosophy and History of Mathematics. [REVIEW] World Scientific.score: 49.0
    This volume focuses on the importance of historical enquiry for the appreciation of philosophical problems concerning mathematics.
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  37. R. Badii (1997). Complexity: Hierarchical Structures and Scaling in Physics. Cambridge University Press.score: 49.0
    This is a comprehensive discussion of complexity as it arises in physical, chemical, and biological systems, as well as in mathematical models of nature. Common features of these apparently unrelated fields are emphasised and incorporated into a uniform mathematical description, with the support of a large number of detailed examples and illustrations. The quantitative study of complexity is a rapidly developing subject with special impact in the fields of physics, mathematics, information science, and biology. Because of the (...)
     
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  38. James T. Cushing (1998). Philosophical Concepts in Physics: The Historical Relation Between Philosophy and Scientific Theories. Cambridge University Press.score: 49.0
    This book examines a selection of philosophical issues in the context of specific episodes in the development of physical theories. Advances in science are presented against the historical and philosophical backgrounds in which they occurred. A major aim is to impress upon the reader the essential role that philosophical considerations have played in the actual practice of science. The book begins with some necessary introduction to the history of ancient and early modern science, with major emphasis being given to (...)
     
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  39. John J. Stachel (ed.) (2005). Einstein's Miraculous Year: Five Papers That Changed the Face of Physics. Princeton University Press.score: 49.0
    After 1905, Einstein's miraculous year, physics would never be the same again. In those twelve months, Einstein shattered many cherished scientific beliefs with five extraordinary papers that would establish him as the world's leading physicist. This book brings those papers together in an accessible format. The best-known papers are the two that founded special relativity: On the Electrodynamics of Moving Bodies and Does the Inertia of a Body Depend on Its Energy Content? In the former, Einstein showed that absolute (...)
     
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  40. Huw Price, 1. The Most Underrated Discovery in the History of Physics?score: 48.0
    Late in the nineteenth century, physics noticed a puzzling conflict between the laws of physics and what actually happens. The laws make no distinction between past and future—if they allow a process to happen one way, they allow it in reverse.1 But many familiar processes are in practice ‘irreversible’, common in one orientation but unknown ‘backwards’. Air leaks out of a punctured tyre, for example, but never leaks back in. Hot drinks cool down to room temperature, but never (...)
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  41. Karl Popper (1970). A Realist View of Logic, Physics, and History. In. In Hermann Bondi, Wolfgang Yourgrau & Allen duPont Breck (eds.), Physics, Logic, and History. New York,Plenum Press. 1--37.score: 48.0
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  42. Victor J. Stenger (2006). A Scenario for a Natural Origin of Our Universe Using a Mathematical Model Based on Established Physics and Cosmology. Philo 9 (2):93-102.score: 48.0
    A mathematical model of the natural origin of our universe is presented. The model is based only on well-established physics. No claim is made that this model uniquely represents exactly how the universe came about. But the viability of a single model serves to refute any assertions that the universe cannot have come about by natural means.
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  43. Richard F. Hassing (2011). History of Physics and the Thought of Jacob Klein. New Yearbook for Phenomenology and Phenomenological Philosophy 11:214-248.score: 48.0
    Aristotelian, classical, and quantum physics are compared and contrasted in light of Jacob Klein’s account of the algebraicization of thought and the resultingdetachment of mind from world, even as human problem-solving power is greatly increased. Two fundamental features of classical physics are brought out: species-neutrality, which concerns the relation between the intelligible and the sensible, and physico-mathematical secularism, which concerns the question of the difference between mathematical objects and physical objects, and whether any differences matter. In (...)
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  44. Abraham Pais (1986). Inward Bound: Of Matter and Forces in the Physical World. Oxford University Press.score: 48.0
    Abraham Pais's Subtle Is the Lord was a publishing phenomenon: a mathematically sophisticated exposition of the science and the life of Albert Einstein that reached a huge audience and won an American Book Award. Reviewers hailed the book as "a monument to sound scholarship and graceful style" (The New York Times Book Review), "an extraordinary biography of an extraordinary man" (Christian Science Monitor), and "a fine book" (Scientific American). In this groundbreaking new volume, Pais undertakes a history of the (...)
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  45. Kevin Davey (2003). Is Mathematical Rigor Necessary in Physics? British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 54 (3):439-463.score: 48.0
    Many arguments found in the physics literature involve concepts that are not well-defined by the usual standards of mathematics. I argue that physicists are entitled to employ such concepts without rigorously defining them so long as they restrict the sorts of mathematical arguments in which these concepts are involved. Restrictions of this sort allow the physicist to ignore calculations involving these concepts that might lead to contradictory results. I argue that such restrictions need not be ad hoc, but (...)
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  46. Jon Dorling (1973). Demonstrative Induction: Its Significant Role in the History of Physics. Philosophy of Science 40 (3):360-372.score: 48.0
    It is argued in this paper that the valid argument forms coming under the general heading of Demonstrative Induction have played a highly significant role in the history of theoretical physics. This situation was thoroughly appreciated by several earlier philosophers of science and deserves to be more widely known and understood.
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  47. Nancy Cartwright (1984). Causation in Physics: Causal Processes and Mathematical Derivations. PSA: Proceedings of the Biennial Meeting of the Philosophy of Science Association 1984:391 - 404.score: 48.0
    Causal claims in physics may have two familiar kinds of support: theoretical and experimental. This paper claims that a rigorous mathematical derivation in a realistic model is necessary, though not sufficient, for full theoretical support. The support is not provided by the derivation itself; but rather it comes from a detailed back-tracing through the derivation, matching the mathematical dependencies, point by point, with details of the causal story. This back-tracing is not enough to pick out the correct (...)
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  48. Karl Popper (1970). A Realist View of Physics, Logic and History. In Hermann Bondi, Wolfgang Yourgrau & Allen duPont Breck (eds.), Physics, Logic, and History. New York,Plenum Press. 18.score: 48.0
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  49. Cheng-Shi Liu (2011). Trial Equation Method Based on Symmetry and Applications to Nonlinear Equations Arising in Mathematical Physics. Foundations of Physics 41 (5):793-804.score: 46.0
    To find exact traveling wave solutions to nonlinear evolution equations, we propose a method combining symmetry properties with trial polynomial solution to nonlinear ordinary differential equations. By the method, we obtain some exact traveling wave solutions to the Burgers-KdV equations and a kind of reaction-diffusion equations with high order nonlinear terms. As a result, we prove that the Burgers-KdV equation does not have the real solution in the form a 0+a 1tan ξ+a 2tan 2 ξ, which indicates that some types (...)
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