Search results for 'Mathematical physics History' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  1
    John Hendry (1983). Mathematical Sciences J. L. Heilbron & Bruce R. Wheaton, Literature on the History of Physics in the Twentieth Century. Berkeley: University of California Office for History of Science and Technology, 1981. Pp. Xi + 485. No Price Stated. ISBN 0-918102-012-2. David De Vorkin, The History of Modern Astronomy and Astrophysics. A Selected, Annotated, Bibliography. New York: Garland Publishing, 1982. Pp. Xxvii + 434. $65.00. ISBN 0-8240-9283-X. [REVIEW] British Journal for the History of Science 16 (3):292.
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  2.  36
    Marij van Strien, Continuity, Causality and Determinism in Mathematical Physics: From the Late 18th Until the Early 20th Century.
    It is commonly thought that before the introduction of quantum mechanics, determinism was a straightforward consequence of the laws of mechanics. However, around the nineteenth century, many physicists, for various reasons, did not regard determinism as a provable feature of physics. This is not to say that physicists in this period were not committed to determinism; there were some physicists who argued for fundamental indeterminism, but most were committed to determinism in some sense. However, for them, determinism was often (...)
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  3. I. Grattan-Guinness (ed.) (1994). Companion Encyclopedia of the History and Philosophy of the Mathematical Sciences. Routledge.
    The Companion Encyclopedia is the first comprehensive work to cover all the principal lines and themes of the history and philosophy of mathematics from ancient times up to the twentieth century. In 176 articles contributed by 160 authors of 18 nationalities, the work describes and analyzes the variety of theories, proofs, techniques, and cultural and practical applications of mathematics. The work's aim is to recover our mathematical heritage and show the importance of mathematics today by treating its interactions (...)
     
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  4.  27
    Michael Friedman (2003). Transcendental Philosophy and Mathematical Physics. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 34 (1):29-43.
    This paper explores the relationship between Kant's views on the metaphysical foundations of Newtonian mathematical physics and his more general transcendental philosophy articulated in the Critique of Pure Reason. I argue that the relationship between the two positions is very close indeed and, in particular, that taking this relationship seriously can shed new light on the structure of the transcendental deduction of the categories as expounded in the second edition of the Critique.
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  5.  2
    Ricardo Karam (2015). Interactions Between Mathematics and Physics: The History of the Concept of Function—Teaching with and About Nature of Mathematics. Science and Education 24 (5 - 6):543-559.
    In this paper, we discuss the history of the concept of function and emphasize in particular how problems in physics have led to essential changes in its definition and application in mathematical practices. Euler defined a function as an analytic expression, whereas Dirichlet defined it as a variable that depends in an arbitrary manner on another variable. The change was required when mathematicians discovered that analytic expressions were not sufficient to represent physical phenomena such as the vibration (...)
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  6.  6
    Franfoise Monnoyeur Broitman (2013). The Indefinite within Descartes' Mathematical Physics. Eidos: Revista de Filosofía de la Universidad Del Norte 19 (19):107-122.
    Descartes' philosophy contains an intriguing notion of the infinite, a concept labeled by the philosopher as indefinite. Even though Descartes clearly defined this term on several occasions in the correspondence with his contemporaries, as well as in his Principles of Philosophy, numerous problems about its meaning have arisen over the years. Most commentators reject the view that the indefinite could mean a real thing and, instead, identify it with an Aristotelian potential infinite. In the first part of this article, I (...)
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  7. Richard F. Hassing (2011). History of Physics and the Thought of Jacob Klein. New Yearbook for Phenomenology and Phenomenological Philosophy 11:214-248.
    Aristotelian, classical, and quantum physics are compared and contrasted in light of Jacob Klein’s account of the algebraicization of thought and the resultingdetachment of mind from world, even as human problem-solving power is greatly increased. Two fundamental features of classical physics are brought out: species-neutrality, which concerns the relation between the intelligible and the sensible, and physico-mathematical secularism, which concerns the question of the difference between mathematical objects and physical objects, and whether any differences matter. In (...)
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  8.  12
    Trish Glazebrook (2001). Zeno Against Mathematical Physics. Journal of the History of Ideas 62 (2):193-210.
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  9.  2
    L. Williams (1986). Wranglers and Physicists: Studies on Cambridge Mathematical Physics in the Nineteenth Century by P. M. Harman. [REVIEW] Isis: A Journal of the History of Science 77:722-723.
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  10.  1
    J. Ravetz (1961). The Representation of Physical Quantities in Eighteenth-Century Mathematical Physics. Isis: A Journal of the History of Science 52:7-20.
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  11. Jeremy Gray (2005). A NDREW W ARWICK, Masters of Theory: Cambridge and the Rise of Mathematical Physics. Chicago and London: University of Chicago Press, 2003. Pp. Xiv+572. ISBN 0-226-87375-7. £20.50, $29.00. [REVIEW] British Journal for the History of Science 38 (3):372.
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  12. Frank A. J. L. James (1987). P. M. Harman . Wranglers and Physicists. Studies on Cambridge [Mathematical] Physics in the Nineteenth Century. Manchester: Manchester University Press, 1985. Pp. Viii + 261. ISBN 0-7190-1756-4. £27.50. [REVIEW] British Journal for the History of Science 20 (2):233.
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  13. Anneliese Maier (1957). Thomas of Bradwardine, His Tractatus de Proportionibus, Its Significance for the Development of Mathematical Physics by H. Lamar Crosby. [REVIEW] Isis: A Journal of the History of Science 48:84-87.
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  14. Ernest Moody (1957). William Heytesbury: Medieval Logic and the Rise of Mathematical Physics by Curtis Wilson. [REVIEW] Isis: A Journal of the History of Science 48:488-489.
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  15. David Wilson (2004). Masters of Theory: Cambridge and the Rise of Mathematical Physics. [REVIEW] Isis: A Journal of the History of Science 95:130-131.
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  16.  19
    C. W. Kilmister (1994). Eddington's Search for a Fundamental Theory: A Key to the Universe. Cambridge University Press.
    Sir Arthur Eddington, the celebrated astrophysicist, made great strides towards his own 'theory of everything'in his last two books published in 1936 and 1946. Unlike his earlier lucid and authoritative works, these are strangely tentative and obscure - as if he were nervous of the significant advances that he might be making. This volume examines both how Eddington came to write these uncharacteristic books - in the context of the physics and history of the day - and what (...)
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  17.  4
    Allan A. Mills (2004). The Lodestone: History, Physics, and Formation. Annals of Science 61 (3):273-319.
    The lodestone is an extremely rare form of the mineral magnetite that occurs naturally as a permanent magnet. It therefore attracts metallic iron as well as fragments of ordinary ‘inert’ magnetite. This ‘magic’ property was known to many ancient cultures, and a powerful lodestone has always commanded a high price. By the eleventh century AD the Chinese had discovered that a freely suspended elongated lodestone would tend to set with its long axis approximately north–south, and utilized this property in the (...)
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  18.  9
    Mary B. Hesse (1961). Forces and Fields: The Concept of Action at a Distance in the History of Physics. Dover Publications.
    This history of physics focuses on the question, "How do bodies act on one another across space?" The variety of answers illustrates the function of fundamental analogies or models in physics as well as the role of so-called unobservable entities. Forces and Fields presents an in-depth look at the science of ancient Greece, and it examines the influence of antique philosophy on seventeenth-century thought. Additional topics embrace many elements of modern physics--the empirical basis of quantum mechanics, (...)
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  19.  7
    J. L. Heilbron (ed.) (2005). The Oxford Guide to the History of Physics and Astronomy. Oxford University Press.
    With over 150 alphabetically arranged entries about key scientists, concepts, discoveries, technological innovations, and learned institutions, the Oxford Guide to Physics and Astronomy traces the history of physics and astronomy from the Renaissance to the present. For students, teachers, historians, scientists, and readers of popular science books such as Galileo's Daughter, this guide deciphers the methods and philosophies of physics and astronomy as well as the historical periods from which they emerged. Meant to serve the lay (...)
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  20.  7
    Raffaele Pisano & Danilo Capecchi (2013). Conceptual and Mathematical Structures of Mechanical Science in the Western Civilization Around 18th Century. Almagest 4 (2):86-21.
    One may discuss the role played by mechanical science in the history of scientific ideas, particularly in physics, focusing on the significance of the relationship between physics and mathematics in describing mathematical laws in the context of a scientific theory. In the second Newtonian law of motion, space and time are crucial physical magnitudes in mechanics, but they are also mathematical magnitudes as involved in derivative operations. Above all, if we fail to acknowledge their (...) meaning, we fail to comprehend the whole Newtonian mechanical apparatus. For instance, let us think about velocity and acceleration. In this case, the approach to conceive and define foundational mechanical objects and their mathematical interpretations changes. Generally speaking, one could prioritize mathematical solutions for Lagrange’s equations, rather than the crucial role played by collisions and geometric motion in Lazare Carnot’s operative mechanics, or Faraday’s experimental science with respect to Ampère’s mechanical approach in the electric current domain, or physico-mathematical choices in Maxwell’s electromagnetic theory. In this paper, we will focus on the historical emergence of mechanical science from a physico-mathematical standpoint and emphasize significant similarities and/or differences in mathematical approaches by some key authors of the 18th century. Attention is paid to the role of mathematical interpretation for physical objects. (shrink)
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  21.  12
    Kurt Smith (2003). Was Descartes's Physics Mathematical? History of Philosophy Quarterly 20 (3):245 - 256.
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  22.  1
    William Pohle (1971). The Mathematical Foundations of Plato's Atomic Physics. Isis: A Journal of the History of Science 62:36-46.
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  23. V. Lenzen (1952). The Rise of the New Physics: Its Mathematical and Physical Theories by A. D'Abro. [REVIEW] Isis: A Journal of the History of Science 43:292-293.
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  24.  62
    Thomas Ryckman (2011). What Does History Matter to Philosophy of Physics? Journal of the Philosophy of History 5 (3):496-512.
    Naturalized metaphysics remains a default presupposition of much contemporary philosophy of physics. As metaphysics is supposed to be about the general structure of reality, so a naturalized metaphysics draws upon our best physical theories: Assuming the truth of such a theory, it attempts to answer the “foundational question par excellence “, “how could the world possibly be the way this theory says it is?“ It is argued that attention to historical detail in the development and formulation of physical theories (...)
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  25.  9
    Jed Z. Buchwald & Robert Fox (eds.) (2013). The Oxford Handbook of the History of Physics. Oxford University Press.
    part. I. Physics and the new science -- part. II. The long eighteenth century -- part III. Fashioning the discipline : from natural philosophy to physics -- part IV. Modern physics.
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  26.  7
    Roger G. Newton (2007). From Clockwork to Crapshoot: A History of Physics. Belknap Press of Harvard University Press.
    From Clockwork to Crapshoot provides the perspective needed to understand contemporary developments in physics in relation to philosophical traditions as far ...
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  27. Mario Castellana (2004). Razionalismi Senza Dogmi: Per Una Epistemologia Della Fisica-Matematica. Rubbettino.
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  28. J. D. Bernal (1972). The Extension of Man: A History of Physics Before 1900. London,Weidenfeld and Nicolson.
  29.  49
    J. D. Bernal (1972). The Extension of Man: A History of Physics Before the Quantum. Cambridge,M.I.T. Press.
  30. Harry Fawcett Buckley (1927). A Short History of Physics. London, Methuen & Co. Ltd..
     
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  31.  9
    Anton Z. Capri (2007). From Quanta to Quarks: More Anecdotal History of Physics. World Scientific.
    Chapter Prologue “The scientific theory I like the best is that the rings of Saturn are composed entirely of lost airline baggage.” Max Born Ever since, ...
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  32. Howard T. Milhorn (2008). The History of Physics: A Biographical Approach. Virtualbookworm.Com Pub..
     
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  33. Anne Rooney (2013). The History of Physics. Rosen Pub..
     
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  34. Emile Borel (1952). L'imaginaire Et Le Réel En Mathématiques Et En Physique. Paris, A. Michel.
     
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  35. Allen Dupont Breck, Wolfgang Yourgrau, Hermann Bondi & Physical Reality History International Colloquium on Logic (1970). Physics, Logic, and History Based on the First International Colloquium Held at the University of Denver, May 16-20, 1966. [REVIEW] Monograph Collection (Matt - Pseudo).
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  36.  41
    Thomas Ryckman (2004). The Reign of Relativity: Philosophy in Physics, 1915-1925. Oxford University Press.
    Universally recognized as bringing about a revolutionary transformation of the notions of space, time, and motion in physics, Einstein's theory of gravitation, known as "general relativity," was also a defining event for 20th century philosophy of science. During the decisive first ten years of the theory's existence, two main tendencies dominated its philosophical reception. This book is an extended argument that the path actually taken, which became logical empiricist philosophy of science, greatly contributed to the current impasse over realism, (...)
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  37. Uskali Mäki, Stéphanie Ruphy, Gerhard Schurz & Ioannis Votsis (eds.) (forthcoming). Recent Developments in the Philosophy of Science: EPSA13 Helsinki. Springer.
    This volume showcases the best of recent research in the philosophy of science. A compilation of papers presented at the EPSA 13, it explores a broad distribution of topics such as causation, truthlikeness, scientific representation, gender-specific medicine, laws of nature, science funding and the wisdom of crowds. Papers are organised into headings which form the structure of the book. Readers will find that it covers several major fields within the philosophy of science, from general philosophy of science to the more (...)
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  38. Max Jammer (1993). Concepts of Space: The History of Theories of Space in Physics. Dover Publications.
    Newly updated study surveys concept of space from standpoint of historical development. Space in antiquity, Judeo-Christian ideas about space, Newton’s concept of absolute space, space from 18th century to present. Extensive new chapter (6) reviews changes in philosophy of space since publication of second edition (1969). Numerous original quotations and bibliographical references. "...admirably compact and swiftly paced style."—Philosophy of Science. Foreword by Albert Einstein. Bibliography.
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  39.  2
    Ulrich Majer (2001). The Axiomatic Method and the Foundations of Science: Historical Roots of Mathematical Physics in Göttingen. Vienna Circle Institute Yearbook 8:11-33.
    The aim of the paper is this: Instead of presenting a provisional and necessarily insufficient characterization of what mathematical physics is, I will ask the reader to take it just as that, what he or she thinks or believes it is, yet to be prepared to revise his opinion in the light of what I am going to tell. Because this is precisely, what I intend to do. I will challenge some of the received or standard views about (...)
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  40.  69
    Masaki Hrada (2008). Revision of Phenomenology for Mathematical Physics. Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 43:73-80.
    Fundamental notions Husserl introduced in Ideen I, such as epochè, reality, and empty X as substrate, might be useful for elucidating how mathematical physics concepts are produced. However, this is obscured in the context of Husserl’s phenomenology itself. For this possibility, the author modifies Husserl’s fundamental notions introduced for pure phenomenology, which found all sciences on the absolute Ego. Subsequently, the author displaces Husserl's phenomenological notions toward the notions operating inside scientific activities themselves and shows this using a (...)
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  41.  3
    Michael Stöltzner (2001). Opportunistic Axiomatics: Von Neumann on the Methodology of Mathematical Physics. Vienna Circle Institute Yearbook 8:35-62.
    On December 10th, 1947, John von Neumann wrote to the Spanish translator of his Mathematical Foundations of Quantum Mechanics: 1Your questions on the nature of mathematical physics and theoretical physics are interesting but a little difficult to answer with precision in my own mind. I have always drawn a somewhat vague line of demarcation between the two subjects, but it was really more a difference in distribution of emphases. I think that in theoretical physics the (...)
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  42.  10
    Erik Curiel, On the Formal Consistency of Theory and Experiment, with Applications to Problems in the Initial-Value Formulation of the Partial-Differential Equations of Mathematical Physics.
    The dispute over the viability of various theories of relativistic, dissipative fluids is analyzed. The focus of the dispute is identified as the question of determining what it means for a theory to be applicable to a given type of physical system under given conditions. The idea of a physical theory's regime of propriety is introduced, in an attempt to clarify the issue, along with the construction of a formal model trying to make the idea precise. This construction involves a (...)
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  43.  5
    Miklós Rédei (2002). Mathematical Physics and Philosophy of Physics. Vienna Circle Institute Yearbook 9:239-243.
    The main claim of this talk is that mathematical physics and philosophy of physics are not different. This claim, so formulated, is obviously false because it is overstated; however, since no non-tautological statement is likely to be completely true, it is a meaningful question whether the overstated claim expresses some truth. I hope it does, or so I’ll argue. The argument consists of two parts: First I’ll recall some characteristic features of von Neumann’s work on mathematical (...)
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  44.  23
    Michael Liston (1993). Reliability in Mathematical Physics. Philosophy of Science 60 (1):1-21.
    In this paper I argue three things: (1) that the interactionist view underlying Benacerraf's (1973) challenge to mathematical beliefs renders inexplicable the reliability of most of our beliefs in physics; (2) that examples from mathematical physics suggest that we should view reliability differently; and (3) that abstract mathematical considerations are indispensable to explanations of the reliability of our beliefs.
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  45. Hermann Bondi, Wolfgang Yourgrau & Allen duPont Breck (eds.) (1970). Physics, Logic, and History. New York,Plenum Press.
  46. Hermann Bondi, Wolfgang Yourgrau & Allen Dupont Breck (1970). Physics, Logic and History Based on the First International Colloquium Held at the University of Denver, May 16-20, 1966. Contributors: Hermann Bondi [and Others] Edited by Wolfgang Yourgrau and Allen D. Breck. [REVIEW] Plenum Press.
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  47. Stanisław J. Surma (ed.) (1973). Studies in the History of Mathematical Logic. Wrocław,Zakład Narodowy Im. Ossolinskich.
  48.  52
    Bryan W. Roberts (2011). How Galileo Dropped the Ball and Fermat Picked It Up. Synthese 180 (3):337-356.
    This paper introduces a little-known episode in the history of physics, in which a mathematical proof by Pierre Fermat vindicated Galileo’s characterization of freefall. The first part of the paper reviews the historical context leading up to Fermat’s proof. The second part illustrates how a physical and a mathematical insight enabled Fermat’s result, and that a simple modification would satisfy any of Fermat’s critics. The result is an illustration of how a purely theoretical argument can settle (...)
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  49.  13
    Leonid Grinin (2007). Production Revolutions and Periodization of History: A Comparative and Theoretic-Mathematical Approach. Social Evolution and History 6 (2).
    There is no doubt that periodization is a rather effective method of data ordering and analysis, but it deals with exceptionally complex types of processual and temporal phenomena and thus it simplifies historical reality. Many scholars emphasize the great importance of periodization for the study of history. In fact, any periodization suffers from one-sidedness and certain deviations from reality. However, the number and significance of such deviations can be radically diminished as the effectiveness of periodization is directly connected with (...)
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  50.  41
    Peter Garik, Luciana Garbayo, Yann Benétreau-Dupin, Charles Winrich, Andrew Duffy, Nicholas Gross & Manher Jariwala (2015). Teaching the Conceptual History of Physics to Physics Teachers. Science and Education 24 (4):387-408.
    For nearly a decade we have taught the history and philosophy of science as part of courses aimed at the professional development of physics teachers. The focus of the history of science instruction is on the stages in the development of the concepts and theories of physics. For this instruction, we designed activities to help the teachers organize their understanding of this historical development. The activities include scientific modeling using archaic theories. We conducted surveys to gauge (...)
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