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Profile: Mats J Hansson (Uppsala Universitet)
  1. Joanna Stjernschantz Forsberg, Mats G. Hansson & Stefan Eriksson (forthcoming). Why Participating in (Certain) Scientific Research is a Moral Duty. Journal of Medical Ethics:2012-100859.
    Our starting point in this article is the debate between John Harris and Iain Brassington on whether or not there is a duty to take part in scientific research. We consider the arguments that have been put forward based on fairness and a duty to rescue, and suggest an alternative justification grounded in a hypothetical agreement: that is, because effective healthcare cannot be taken for granted, but requires continuous medical research, and nobody knows what kind of healthcare they will need, (...)
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  2. Linus Johnsson, Stefan Eriksson, Gert Helgesson & Mats G. Hansson (2014). Making Researchers Moral: Why Trustworthiness Requires More Than Ethics Guidelines and Review. Research Ethics 10 (1):29-46.
    Research ethics, once a platform for declaring intent, discussing moral issues and providing advice and guidance to researchers, has developed over time into an extra-legal regulatory system, complete with steering documents (ethics guidelines), overseeing bodies (research ethics committees) and formal procedures (informed consent). The process of institutionalizing distrust is usually motivated by reference to past atrocities committed in the name of research and the need to secure the trustworthiness of the research system. This article examines some limitations of this approach. (...)
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  3. Malin Masterton, Tobias Renberg, Mats G. Hansson & Sofia Kälvemark Sporrong (2014). Ethical Review Boards Are Poor Advocates for Patient Perspectives. Research Ethics 10 (3):169-181.
    In medical research, patients are increasingly recognized with ‘lay knowledge’ but their views are poorly researched. The study objective was to investigate patients’ attitudes to medical research. This is in comparison to lay and expert members on ethical review boards (ERB), as their task is to evaluate the risk−benefits of research, which are ultimately grounded in attitudes and values. From focus-group interviews with patients suffering from chronic inflammatory diseases, a postal questionnaire was developed and sent to patient members of the (...)
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  4. Linus Johnsson, Gert Helgesson, Mats G. Hansson & Stefan Eriksson (2013). Adequate Trust Avails, Mistaken Trust Matters: On the Moral Responsibility of Doctors as Proxies for Patients' Trust in Biobank Research. Bioethics 27 (9):485-492.
    In Sweden, most patients are recruited into biobank research by non-researcher doctors. Patients' trust in doctors may therefore be important to their willingness to participate. We suggest a model of trust that makes sense of such transitions of trust between domains and distinguishes adequate trust from mistaken trust. The unique position of doctors implies, we argue, a Kantian imperfect duty to compensate for patients' mistaken trust. There are at least three kinds of mistaken trust, each of which requires a different (...)
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  5. Ashkan Atry, Mats G. Hansson & Ulrik Kihlbom (2012). Beyond the Individual: Sources of Attitudes Towards Rule Violation in Sport. Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 6 (4):467-479.
    Today, certain rule-violating behaviours, such as doping, are considered to be an issue of concern for the sport community. This paper underlines and examines the affective dimensions involved in moral responses to, and attitudes towards, rule-violating behaviours in sport. The key role played by affective processes underlying individual-level moral judgement has already been implicated by recent developments in moral psychological theories, and by neurophysiological studies. However, we propose and discuss the possibility of affective processes operating on a social level which (...)
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  6. Ashkan Atry, Mats G. Hansson & Ulrik Kihlbom (2011). Gene Doping and the Responsibility of Bioethicists. Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 5 (2):149 - 160.
    In this paper we will argue: (1) that scholars, regardless of their normative stand against or for genetic enhancement indeed have a moral/professional obligation to hold on to a realistic and up-to-date conception of genetic enhancement; (2) that there is an unwarranted hype surrounding the issue of genetic enhancement in general, and gene doping in particular; and (3) that this hype is, at least partly, created due to a simplistic and reductionist conception of genetics often adopted by bioethicists.
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  7. Malin Masterton, Mats G. Hansson & Anna T. Höglund (2010). In Search of the Missing Subject: Narrative Identity and Posthumous Wronging. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C 41 (4):340-346.
  8. Christina M. Hultman, Ann-Christin Lindgren, Mats G. Hansson, Jan Carlstedt-Duke, Martin Ritzen, Ingemar Persson & Helle Kieler (2009). Ethical Issues in Cancer Register Follow-Up of Hormone Treatment in Adolescence. Public Health Ethics 2 (1):30-36.
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  9. Ulrica Swartling, Gert Helgesson, Mats G. Hansson & Johnny Ludvigsson (2008). Parental Authority, Research Interests and Children's Right to Decide in Medical Research–an Uneasy Tension? Clinical Ethics 3 (2):69-74.
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  10. Mats G. Hansson, Ulrik Kihlbom, Torsten Tuvemo, Leif A. Olsen & Alina Rodriguez (2007). Ethics Takes Time, but Not That Long. BMC Medical Ethics 8 (1):6.
    Time and communication are important aspects of the medical consultation. Physician behavior in real-life pediatric consultations in relation to ethical practice, such as informed consent (provision of information, understanding), respect for integrity and patient autonomy (decision-making), has not been subjected to thorough empirical investigation. Such investigations are important tools in developing sound ethical praxis.
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  11. Ulrik Kihlbom, Mats G. Hansson, Torsten Tuvemo & Alina Rodriguez Claesson (2007). Ethics Takes Time - But Not That Long. BMC Medical Ethics 8 (6):8:6doi:10.1186/1472-6939-8-6.
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  12. Malin Masterton, Mats G. Hansson, Anna T. Höglund & Gert Helgesson (2007). Can the Dead Be Brought Into Disrepute? Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 28 (2):137-149.
    Queen Christina of Sweden was unconventional in her time, leading to hypotheses on her gender and possible hermaphroditic nature. If genetic analysis can substantiate the latter claim, could this bring the queen into disrepute 300 years after her death? Joan C. Callahan has argued that if a reputation changes, this constitutes a change only in the group of people changing their views and not in the person whose reputation it is. Is this so? This paper analyses what constitutes change and (...)
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  13. Malin Masterton, Gert Helgesson, Anna T. Höglund & Mats G. Hansson (2007). Queen Christina's Moral Claim on the Living: Justification of a Tenacious Moral Intuition. [REVIEW] Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 10 (3):321-327.
    In the long-running debate on the interest of the dead, Joan C. Callahan argues against such interests and although Søren Holm for practical reasons is prepared to consider posthumous interests, he does not see any moral basis to support such interests. He argues that the whole question is irresolvable, yet finds privacy interests where Tutankhamen is concerned. Callahan argues that there can be reasons to hold on to the fiction that there are posthumous interests, namely if it is comforting for (...)
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  14. Sofia Kälvemark Sporrong, Bengt Arnetz, Mats G. Hansson, Peter Westerholm & Anna T. Höglund (2007). Developing Ethical Competence in Health Care Organizations. Nursing Ethics 14 (6):825-837.
    Increased work complexity and financial strain in the health care sector have led to higher demands on staff to handle ethical issues. These demands can elicit stress reactions, that is, moral distress. One way to support professionals in handling ethical dilemmas is education and training in ethics. This article reports on a controlled prospective study evaluating a structured education and training program in ethics concerning its effects on moral distress. The results show that the participants were positive about the training (...)
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  15. Mats G. Hansson (2006). Combining Efficiency and Concerns About Integrity When Using Human Biobanks. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C 37 (3):520-532.
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  16. Mats G. Hansson (2002). Imaginative Ethics €“ Bringing Ethical Praxis Into Sharper Relief. Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 5 (1):33-42.
    The empirical basis for this article is threeyears of experience with ethical rounds atUppsala University Hospital. Three standardapproaches of ethical reasoning are examined aspotential explanations of what actually occursduring the ethical rounds. For reasons given,these are not found to be satisfyingexplanations. An approach called ``imaginativeethics'', is suggested as a more satisfactoryaccount of this kind of ethical reasoning. Theparticipants in the ethical rounds seem to drawon a kind of moral competence based on personallife experience and professional competence andexperience. By listening to (...)
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  17. Mats G. Hansson (2000). Protecting Research Integrity. Science and Engineering Ethics 6 (1):79-90.
    It is not contoversial to state that acts of fraud do not belong in the academic world. What is debated is the best way to minimise the risk of fraudulent behaviour. Broadly speaking there are two different approaches to this problem. They differ with regard to whether the main focus is on internal or external control. In this article I argue that the main emphasis should be on internal structures in order to achieve the desired end. Only when the internal (...)
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  18. Mats G. Hansson (1992). [Book Review] Human Dignity and Animal Well-Being, a Kantian Contribution to Biomedical Ethics. [REVIEW] Journal of Medical Ethics 18:165-166.
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