Search results for 'Matt Christensen' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  14
    Matt Christensen (1996). Emerson. Newsletter of the Society for the Advancement of American Philosophy 24 (74):37-39.
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  2.  10
    Kate Christensen (1999). Kate Christensen Speaks with Pat Matheny, a Recipient of Lethal Medication Under Oregon's Death with Dignity Act. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 8 (4):564-568.
    Oregon is the only state in the United States where a physician may legally prescribe a lethal dose of barbiturate for a patient intending suicide. The Oregon Death with Dignity Act was passed by voters in 1994 and came into effect after much legal wrangling in October of 1997. At the same time, a cabinetmaker named Pat Matheny was struggling with progressive weakness from amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, or ALS. I met with Pat and his family for a lengthy interview in (...)
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  3. Darrel E. Christensen (1970). Hegel and the Philosophy of Religion the Wofford Symposium. Edited, and with Introd. By Darrel E. Christensen. Monograph Collection (Matt - Pseudo).
     
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  4.  17
    Wayne David Christensen & Cliff A. Hooker (2001). Self-Directed Agents. Canadian Journal of Philosophy 31 (Supplement):19-52.
    Wayne D. Christensen and Cliff A. Hooker.
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  5.  64
    Andrew Geeves, Doris Mcllwain, John Sutton & Wayne Christensen (2010). Expanding Expertise: Investigating a Musician’s Experience of Music Performance. ASCS09: Proceedings of the 9th Conference of the Australasian Society for Cognitive Science:106-113.
    Seeking to expand on previous theories, this paper explores the AIR (Applying Intelligence to the Reflexes) approach to expert performance previously outlined by Geeves, Christensen, Sutton and McIlwain (2008). Data gathered from a semi-structured interview investigating the performance experience of Jeremy Kelshaw (JK), a professional musician, is explored. Although JK’s experience of music performance contains inherently uncertain elements, his phenomenological description of an ideal performance is tied to notions of vibe, connection and environment. The dynamic nature of music performance (...)
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  6.  4
    Jerome Christensen (1990). From Rhetoric to Corporate Populism: A Romantic Critique of the Academy in an Age of High Gossip. Critical Inquiry 16 (2):438-465.
    If you are anything like me, you may feel yourself unsure of what, as a critic these days, you ought to be talking about—whether literature qua literature, literature as rhetoric, literature as politics or as history, whether about the persistence of romanticism or the waxing of postmodernism, the decline of Yale or the rise of Duke. If, like me, you are puzzled by what we now ought to be about, you may also be like Paul de Man, who bespoke a (...)
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  7.  4
    Jerome Christensen (1991). Spike Lee, Corporate Populist. Critical Inquiry 17 (3):582-595.
    [W. J. T.] Mitchell focuses on the exemplary status of the Wall of Fame in Sal’s Pizzeria, “an array of signed publicity photos of Italian-American stars in sports, movies, and popular music” . He argues that the Wall “exemplifies the central contradictions of public art” . “The Wall,” he writes, “is important to Sal not just because it displays famous Italians but because they are famous Americans … who have made it possible for Italians to think of themselves as Americans, (...)
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  8.  1
    Jerome Christensen (1986). "Like a Guilty Thing Surprised": Deconstruction, Coleridge, and the Apostasy of Criticism. Critical Inquiry 12 (4):769-787.
    In his recent book Criticism and Social Change Frank Lentricchia melodramatically pits his critical hero Kenneth Burke, advocate of the intellect’s intervention in social life, against the villainous Paul de Man, “undisputed master in the United States of what is called deconstruction.” Lentricchia charges that “the insidious effect of [de Man’s] work is not the proliferating replication of his way of reading … but the paralysis of praxis itself: an effect that traditionalism, with its liberal view of the division of (...)
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  9. Johnny Christensen (2013). An Essay on the Unity of Stoic Philosophy: Second Edition. Museum Tusculanum Press.
    The ancient Stoics repeatedly stressed the monolithic comprehensiveness of their philosophy, and this book is the only one to provide a holistic grasp of their attempt to synthesize the whole of the human condition into a unified view. Originally published in 1962, _An Essay on the Unity of Stoic Philosophy_ was far ahead of its time. Now a pivotal text, it lays out the core ideas of Stoicism and their interconnection against the backdrop of Aristotelian philosophy, providing a coherent understanding (...)
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  10. Jerome Christensen (1987). Practicing Enlightenment: Hume and the Formation of a Literary Career. University of Wisconsin Press.
    In this highly original study, Jerome Christensen reconstructs the career of a representative Enlightenment man of letters, David Hume. In doing so, Christensen develops a prototype for a post-structuralist biography. Christensen motivates the interplay between Hume’s texts as arguments and as symbolic acts by conceiving of Hume’s literary career as an adaptive discursive practice, the projected and performed narrative of his social life. Students and scholars of eighteenth-century English and French literature, feminist studies, political theory and history, (...)
     
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  11. David Christensen (2007). Epistemology of Disagreement: The Good News. Philosophical Review 116 (2):187-217.
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  12.  86
    David Christensen (2004). Putting Logic in its Place: Formal Constraints on Rational Belief. Oxford University Press.
    What role, if any, does formal logic play in characterizing epistemically rational belief? Traditionally, belief is seen in a binary way - either one believes a proposition, or one doesn't. Given this picture, it is attractive to impose certain deductive constraints on rational belief: that one's beliefs be logically consistent, and that one believe the logical consequences of one's beliefs. A less popular picture sees belief as a graded phenomenon.
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  13. David Christensen (2011). Disagreement, Question-Begging, and Epistemic Self-Criticism. Philosophers' Imprint 11 (6).
    Responding rationally to the information that others disagree with one’s beliefs requires assessing the epistemic credentials of the opposing beliefs. Conciliatory accounts of disagreement flow in part from holding that these assessments must be independent from one’s own initial reasoning on the disputed matter. I argue that this claim, properly understood, does not have the untoward consequences some have worried about. Moreover, some of the difficulties it does engender must be faced by many less conciliatory accounts of disagreement.
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  14. David Christensen (2010). Higher-Order Evidence. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 81 (1):185-215.
    Sometimes we get evidence of our own epistemic malfunction. This can come from finding out we’re fatigued, or have been drugged, or that other competent and well-informed thinkers disagree with our beliefs. This sort of evidence seems to seems to behave differently from ordinary evidence about the world. In particular, getting such evidence can put agents in a position where the most rational response involves violating some epistemic ideal.
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  15. David Christensen (2009). Disagreement as Evidence: The Epistemology of Controversy. Philosophy Compass 4 (5):756-767.
    How much should your confidence in your beliefs be shaken when you learn that others – perhaps 'epistemic peers' who seem as well-qualified as you are – hold beliefs contrary to yours? This article describes motivations that push different philosophers towards opposite answers to this question. It identifies a key theoretical principle that divides current writers on the epistemology of disagreement. It then examines arguments bearing on that principle, and on the wider issue. It ends by describing some outstanding questions (...)
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  16. John Sutton, Doris McIlwain, Wayne Christensen & Andrew Geeves (2011). Applying Intelligence to the Reflexes: Embodied Skills and Habits Between Dreyfus and Descartes. Journal of the British Society for Phenomenology 42 (1):78-103.
    ‘There is no place in the phenomenology of fully absorbed coping’, writes Hubert Dreyfus, ‘for mindfulness. In flow, as Sartre sees, there are only attractive and repulsive forces drawing appropriate activity out of an active body’1. Among the many ways in which history animates dynamical systems at a range of distinctive timescales, the phenomena of embodied human habit, skilful movement, and absorbed coping are among the most pervasive and mundane, and the most philosophically puzzling. In this essay we examine both (...)
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  17.  41
    Jennifer Lackey & David Christensen (eds.) (2013). The Epistemology of Disagreement: New Essays. Oxford University Press.
    This is a collective study of the epistemic significance of disagreement: twelve contributors explore rival responses to the problems that it raises for philosophy.
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  18. Doris McIlwain, John Sutton & Wayne Christensen (2015). Putting Pressure on Theories of Choking: Towards an Expanded Perspective on Breakdown in Skilled Performance. Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 14 (2):253-293.
    There is a widespread view that well-learned skills are automated, and that attention to the performance of these skills is damaging because it disrupts the automatic processes involved in their execution. This idea serves as the basis for an account of choking in high pressure situations. On this view, choking is the result of self-focused attention induced by anxiety. Recent research in sports psychology has produced a significant body of experimental evidence widely interpreted as supporting this account of choking in (...)
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  19.  70
    David Christensen (2014). Conciliation, Uniqueness and Rational Toxicity. Noûs 50 (1):n/a-n/a.
    Conciliationism holds that disagreement of apparent epistemic peers often substantially undermines rational confidence in our opinions. Uniqueness principles say that there is at most one maximally rational doxastic response to any given batch of total evidence. The two views are often thought to be tightly connected. This paper distinguishes two ways of motivating conciliationism, and two ways that conciliationism may be undermined by permissive accounts of rationality. It shows how conciliationism can flourish under certain strongly permissive accounts of rationality. This (...)
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  20.  21
    Lisa Jones Christensen, Ellen Peirce, Laura P. Hartman, W. Michael Hoffman & Jamie Carrier (2007). Ethics, CSR, and Sustainability Education in the Financial Times Top 50 Global Business Schools: Baseline Data and Future Research Directions. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 73 (4):347 - 368.
    This paper investigates how deans and directors at the top 50 global MBA programs (as rated by the "Financial Times" in their 2006 Global MBA rankings) respond to questions about the inclusion and coverage of the topics of ethics, corporate social responsibility, and sustainability at their respective institutions. This work purposely investigates each of the three topics separately. Our findings reveal that: (1) a majority of the schools require that one or more of these topics be covered in their MBA (...)
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  21.  76
    David Christensen (2007). Does Murphy's Law Apply in Epistemology? Self-Doubt and Rational Ideals. Oxford Studies in Epistemology 2:3-31.
    Formally-inclined epistemologists often theorize about ideally rational agents--agents who exemplify rational ideals, such as probabilistic coherence, that human beings could never fully realize. This approach can be defended against the well-know worry that abstracting from human cognitive imperfections deprives the approach of interest. But a different worry arises when we ask what an ideal agent should believe about her own cognitive perfection (even an agent who is in fact cognitively perfect might, it would seem, be uncertain of this fact). Consideration (...)
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  22.  75
    Birgit Christensen & Translated By Andrew F. Smith (2005). Equality and Justice: Remarks on a Necessary Relationship. Hypatia 20 (2):155-163.
    The processes associated with globalization have reinforced and even increased prevailing conditions of inequality among human beings with respect to their political, economic, cultural, and social opportunities. Yet-or perhaps precisely because of this trend-there has been, within political philosophy, an observable tendency to question whether equality in fact should be treated a as central value within a theory of justice. In response, I examine a number of nonegalitarian positions to try to show that the concept of equality cannot be dispensed (...)
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  23.  24
    Wayne David Christensen & Mark H. Bickhard (2002). The Process Dynamics of Normative Function. The Monist 85 (1):3-28.
    Outlines the etiological theory of normative functionality. Analysis of the autonomous system; Function of systems-oriented approaches; Specifications of system identity.
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  24. David Christensen (2010). Rational Reflection. Philosophical Perspectives 24 (1):121-140.
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  25.  82
    David Christensen (1999). Measuring Confirmation. Journal of Philosophy 96 (9):437-461.
  26.  93
    Ian Angus, Lenore Langsdorf, S. Atran, Robert M. Baird, Stuart E. Rosembaum, C. Bonelli Munegato, Scott M. Christensen, Dale R. Turner, Bohdan Dziemidok & Peter Engelmann (1993). Appearance in This List Does Not Preclude a Future Review of the Book. Where They Are Known Prices Are Either Given in $ US or in£ UK. Alcoff, Linda and Potter, Elizabeth (Eds.), Feminist Epistemologies, London, UK, Rout-Ledge, 1993, Pp. 312,£ 35.00,£ 12.99. [REVIEW] Mind 102:406.
  27. Andrew Geeves, Doris J. F. McIlwain, John Sutton & Wayne Christensen (2013). To Think or Not To Think: The Apparent Paradox of Expert Skill in Music Performance. Educational Philosophy and Theory (6):1-18.
    Expert skill in music performance involves an apparent paradox. On stage, expert musicians are required accurately to retrieve information that has been encoded over hours of practice. Yet they must also remain open to the demands of the ever-changing situational contingencies with which they are faced during performance. To further explore this apparent paradox and the way in which it is negotiated by expert musicians, this article profiles theories presented by Roger Chaffin, Hubert Dreyfus and Tony and Helga Noice. For (...)
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  28.  1
    Peer Christensen, Riccardo Fusaroli & Kristian Tylén (2016). Environmental Constraints Shaping Constituent Order in Emerging Communication Systems: Structural Iconicity, Interactive Alignment and Conventionalization. Cognition 146:67-80.
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  29.  60
    David Christensen (2014). Disagreement and Public Controversy. In Jennifer Lackey (ed.), Essays in Collective Epistemology. Oxford University Press
    One of Mill’s main arguments for free speech springs from taking disagreement as an epistemically valuable resource for fallible thinkers. Contemporary conciliationist treatments of disagreement spring from the same motivation, but end up seeing the epistemic implications of disagreement quite differently. Conciliationism also encounters complexities when transposed from the 2-person toy examples featured in the literature to the public disagreements among groups that give the issue much of its urgency. Group disagreements turn out to be in some ways more powerful (...)
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  30.  55
    David Christensen (1991). Clever Bookies and Coherent Beliefs. Philosophical Review 100 (2):229-247.
  31.  99
    David Christensen (2007). Epistemic Self-Respect. Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 107 (1pt3):319-337.
  32. W. D. Christensen & C. A. Hooker (2000). Autonomy and the Emergence of Intelligence: Organised Interactive Construction. Communication and Cognition-Artificial Intelligence 17 (3-4):133-157.
     
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  33. Jonas Christensen & Jesper Kallestrup (2012). Counterfactuals and Downward Causation: A Reply to Zhong. Analysis 72 (3):513-517.
    Lei Zhong (2012. Counterfactuals, regularity and the autonomy approach. Analysis 72: 75–85) argues that non-reductive physicalists cannot establish the autonomy of mental causation by adopting a counterfactual theory of causation since such a theory supports a so-called downward causation argument which rules out mental-to-mental causation. We respond that non-reductive physicalists can consistently resist Zhong's downward causation argument as it equivocates between two familiar notions of a physical realizer.
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  34.  31
    John Michael, Wayne Christensen & Søren Overgaard (2013). Mindreading as Social Expertise. Synthese 191 (5):1-24.
    In recent years, a number of approaches to social cognition research have emerged that highlight the importance of embodied interaction for social cognition (Reddy, How infants know minds, 2008; Gallagher, J Conscious Stud 8:83–108, 2001; Fuchs and Jaegher, Phenom Cogn Sci 8:465–486, 2009; Hutto, in Seemans (ed.) Joint attention: new developments in psychology, philosophy of mind and social neuroscience, 2012). Proponents of such ‘interactionist’ approaches emphasize the importance of embodied responses that are engaged in online social interaction, and which, according (...)
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  35.  22
    W. D. Christensen & C. A. Hooker (2000). An Interactivist-Constructivist Approach to Intelligence: Self-Directed Anticipative Learning. Philosophical Psychology 13 (1):5 – 45.
    This paper outlines an original interactivist-constructivist approach to modelling intelligence and learning as a dynamical embodied form of adaptiveness and explores some applications of I-C to understanding the way cognitive learning is realized in the brain. Two key ideas for conceptualizing intelligence within this framework are developed. These are: intelligence is centrally concerned with the capacity for coherent, context-sensitive, self-directed management of interaction; and the primary model for cognitive learning is anticipative skill construction. Self-directedness is a capacity for integrative process (...)
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  36.  1
    Anne L. Christensen, Jane Cote & Claire K. Latham (2016). Insights Regarding the Applicability of the Defining Issues Test to Advance Ethics Research with Accounting Students: A Meta-Analytic Review. Journal of Business Ethics 133 (1):141-163.
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  37.  89
    David Christensen (1996). Dutch-Book Arguments Depragmatized: Epistemic Consistency for Partial Believers. Journal of Philosophy 93 (9):450-479.
    The most immediately appealing model for formal constraints on degrees of belief is provided by probability theory, which tells us, for instance, that the probability of P can never be greater than that of (P v Q). But while this model has much intuitive appeal, many have been concerned to provide arguments showing that ideally rational degrees of belief would conform to the calculus of probabilities. The arguments most frequently used to make this claim plausible are the so-called "Dutch Book" (...)
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  38. David Christensen (2007). Putting Logic in its Place: Formal Constraints on Rational Belief. Oxford University Press Uk.
    What role, if any, does formal logic play in characterizing epistemically rational belief? Traditionally, belief is seen in a binary way - either one believes a proposition, or one doesn't. Given this picture, it is attractive to impose certain deductive constraints on rational belief: that one's beliefs be logically consistent, and that one believe the logical consequences of one's beliefs. A less popular picture sees belief as a graded phenomenon. This picture invites the use of probabilistic coherence to constrain rational (...)
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  39. David Christensen (2000). Diachronic Coherence Versus Epistemic Impartiality. Philosophical Review 109 (3):349-371.
    It is obvious that we would not want to demand that an agent' s beliefs at different times exhibit the same sort of consistency that we demand from an agent' s simultaneous beliefs; there' s nothing irrational about believing P at one time and not-P at another. Nevertheless, many have thought that some sort of coherence or stability of beliefs over time is an important component of epistemic rationality.
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  40.  23
    Bryce Christensen (2002). The Latter End of Job. Renascence 54 (2):137-147.
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  41.  2
    F. A. Miller, R. Christensen, M. Giacomini & J. S. Robert (2008). Duty to Disclose What? Querying the Putative Obligation to Return Research Results to Participants. Journal of Medical Ethics 34 (3):210-213.
    Many research ethics guidelines now oblige researchers to offer research participants the results of research in which they participated. This practice is intended to uphold respect for persons and ensure that participants are not treated as mere means to an end. Yet some scholars have begun to question a generalised duty to disclose research results, highlighting the potential harms arising from disclosure and questioning the ethical justification for a duty to disclose, especially with respect to individual results. In support of (...)
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  42.  79
    David Christensen (1994). Conservatism in Epistemology. Noûs 28 (1):69-89.
  43.  11
    Sandra L. Christensen & John Kohls (2003). Ethical Decision Making in Times of Organizational Crisis A Framework for Analysis. Business and Society 42 (3):328-358.
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  44.  55
    David Christensen (2013). Epistemic Modesty Defended. In David Christensen & Jennifer Lackey (eds.), The Epistemology of Disagreement: New Essays. Oxford University Press 77.
    It has often been noticed that conciliatory views of disagreement are "self-undermining" in a certain way: advocates of such views cannot consistently maintain them when other philosophers disagree. This leads to apparent problems of instability and even inconsistency. Does self-undermining, then, show conciliationism untenable? If so, the untenablity would extend not only to almost all views of disagreement, but to a wide range of other views supporting what one might call epistemic modesty: roughly, the idea that getting evidence that one (...)
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  45. David Christensen (2009). Introduction: The Epistemology of Disagreement. Episteme 6 (3):231-232.
    One of the most salient features of forming beliefs in a social context is that people end up disagreeing with one another. This is not just an obvious fact about belief-formation; it raises interesting normative questions, especially when people become aware of the opinions of others. How should my beliefs be affected by the knowledge that others hold contrary beliefs? In some cases, the answer seems easy. If I have reason to think that my friend is much better informed than (...)
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  46.  9
    Lisa Feldman Barrett, James Gross, Tamlin Conner Christensen & Michael Benvenuto (2001). Knowing What You 'Re Feeling and Knowing What to Do About It: Mapping the Relation Between Emotion Differentiation and Emotion Regulation'. Cognition and Emotion 15 (6):713-724.
  47.  18
    Darrel E. Christensen (1984). Time and Providence. Idealistic Studies 14 (2):175-176.
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  48.  9
    James Christensen (2015). Weapons, Security, and Oppression: A Normative Study of International Arms Transfers. Journal of Political Philosophy 23 (1):23-39.
  49. David Christensen & Hilary Kornblith (1997). Testimony, Memory and the Limits of the a Priori. Philosophical Studies 86 (1):1-20.
    A number of philosophers, from Thomas Reid1 through C. A. J. Coady2, have argued that one is justified in relying on the testimony of others, and furthermore, that this should be taken as a basic epistemic presumption. If such a general presumption were not ultimately dependent on evidence for the reliability of other people, the ground for this presumption would be a priori. Such a presumption would then have a status like that which Roderick Chisholm claims for the epistemic principle (...)
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  50.  63
    Richard L. Christensen (forthcoming). Colossians 1:15–28. Interpretation 61 (3):318-320.
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