Search results for 'Matt Hills' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Matt Hills (2003). An Event-Based Definition of Art-Horror. In Steven Jay Schneider & Daniel Shaw (eds.), Dark Thoughts: Philosophic Reflections on Cinematic Horror. Scarecrow Press 138--157.
     
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  2. Matt Hills, Deborah Knight & George McKnight (2003). Dallas and Critical Spectatorship, and a Manuscript in Progress, Aristotle on Essence and Human Nature. Cynthia A. Freeland is Associate Professor of Philosophy and Director of Women's Studies at the University of Houston. She has Published Widely on Topics in Ancient Philosophy and Aesthetics, is The. [REVIEW] In Steven Jay Schneider & Daniel Shaw (eds.), Dark Thoughts: Philosophic Reflections on Cinematic Horror. Scarecrow Press 291.
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  3.  4
    Joanne Goss (2006). Matt Hills' The Pleasures of Horror. [REVIEW] Film-Philosophy 10 (3):101-103.
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  4.  3
    Joanne Goss (2006). Review of Matt Hills, The Pleasures of Horror. [REVIEW] Film-Philosophy 10 (3).
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  5. Alison Hills (2010/2012). The Beloved Self: Morality and the Challenge From Egoism. Oxford University Press.
    The Beloved Self is about the holy grail of moral philosophy, an argument against egoism that proves that we all have reasons to be moral. Part One introduces three different versions of egoism. Part Two looks at attempts to prove that egoism is false, and shows that even the more modest arguments that do not try to answer the egoist in her own terms seem to fail. But in part Three, Hills defends morality and develops a new problem for (...)
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  6.  5
    Rosa Bruno-Jofré & George Hills (2011). Changing Visions of Excellence in Ontario School Policy: The Cases of Living and Learning and for the Love of Learning. Educational Theory 61 (3):335-349.
    In this essay, Rosa Bruno-Jofré and George Hills examine two major Ontario policy documents: 1968's Living and Learning and 1994's For the Love of Learning. The purpose is, first, to gain insight into the uses of the term “excellence” in the context of discourse about educational aims and evaluation, and, second, to explore how these uses may have changed over time. Bruno-Jofré and Hills employ the conceptual framework developed by Madhu Prakash and Leonard Waks to elucidate the varied (...)
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  7. Alison Hills (2010). Beloved Self: Morality and the Challenge From Egoism. Oxford University Press Uk.
    The Beloved Self is about the holy grail of moral philosophy, an argument against egoism that proves that we all have reasons to be moral. Part One introduces three different versions of egoism. Part Two looks at attempts to prove that egoism is false, and shows that even the more modest arguments that do not try to answer the egoist in her own terms seem to fail. But in part Three, Hills defends morality and develops a new problem for (...)
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  8. Alison Hills (2012). The Beloved Self: Morality and the Challenge From Egoism. Oxford University Press Uk.
    The Beloved Self is about the holy grail of moral philosophy, an argument against egoism that proves that we all have reasons to be moral. Alison Hills introduces three different versions of egoism; looks at attempts to prove that egoism is false; and shows that even the more modest arguments that do not try to answer the egoist in her own terms seem to fail. She goes on to provide a defense of morality, and argues that it is not (...)
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  9. Alison Hills (2009). Moral Testimony and Moral Epistemology. Ethics 120 (1):94-127.
  10. Alison Hills (2015). Understanding Why. Noûs 49 (2).
    I argue that understanding why p involves a kind of intellectual know how and differsfrom both knowledge that p and knowledge why p (as they are standardly understood).I argue that understanding, in this sense, is valuable.
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  11.  29
    Gail Eynon, Nancy Thorley Hills & Kevin T. Stevens (1997). Factors That Influence the Moral Reasoning Abilities of Accountants: Implications for Universities and the Profession. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 16 (12-13):1297-1309.
    The need to maintain the public trust in the integrity of the accounting profession has led to increased interest in research that examines the moral reasoning abilities (MRA) of Certified Public Accountants (CPAs). This study examines the MRA of CPAs practicing in small firms or as sole practitioners and the factors that affect MRA throughout their working careers.The results indicate that small-firm accounting practitioners exhibit lower MRA than expected for professionals and that age, gender and socio-political beliefs affect the moral (...)
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  12.  7
    Thomas T. Hills, Peter M. Todd, David Lazer, A. David Redish & Iain D. Couzin (2015). Exploration Versus Exploitation in Space, Mind, and Society. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 19 (1):46-54.
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  13.  65
    David Hills (1997). Aptness and Truth in Verbal Metaphor. Philosophical Topics 25 (1):117-153.
  14. Alison Hills (2013). Moral Testimony. Philosophy Compass 8 (6):552-559.
    Testimony is an important source of our knowledge about the world. But to some, there seems something odd, perhaps even wrong, about trusting testimony about specifically moral matters. In this paper, I discuss several different explanations of what might be wrong with trusting moral testimony. These include the possibility that there is no moral knowledge; that moral knowledge cannot be transmitted by moral testimony; that there are reasons not to trust moral testimony either because you should try to gain and (...)
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  15.  7
    Alison Hills (2015). Understanding Why. Noûs 50 (2).
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  16.  28
    Alison Hills (2015). The Intellectuals and the Virtues. Ethics 126 (1):7-36.
    A virtuous person has a distinctive grasp of what is important in the light of which she chooses what to do. In what does this grasp consist? According to the intellectual tradition, moral virtue requires you always to be able to have an explicit, conscious grasp of the reasons why your action is right. Recently, this view has been defended by Julia Annas. I do not think that her argument establishes her conclusion, and I provide further defense of intellectualism, finishing (...)
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  17.  11
    Thomas T. Hills (2006). Animal Foraging and the Evolution of Goal‐Directed Cognition. Cognitive Science 30 (1):3-41.
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  18.  10
    Thomas T. Hills, Peter M. Todd & Michael N. Jones (2015). Foraging in Semantic Fields: How We Search Through Memory. Topics in Cognitive Science 7 (3):513-534.
    When searching for concepts in memory—as in the verbal fluency task of naming all the animals one can think of—people appear to explore internal mental representations in much the same way that animals forage in physical space: searching locally within patches of information before transitioning globally between patches. However, the definition of the patches being searched in mental space is not well specified. Do we search by activating explicit predefined categories and recall items from within that category, or do we (...)
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  19. Alison Hills (2007). Intentions, Foreseen Consequences and the Doctrine of Double Effect. Philosophical Studies 133 (2):257 - 283.
    The difficulty of distinguishing between the intended and the merely foreseen consequences of actions seems to many to be the most serious problem for the doctrine of double effect. It has led some to reject the doctrine altogether, and has left some of its defenders recasting it in entirely different terms. I argue that these responses are unnecessary. Using Bratman’s conception of intention, I distinguish the intended consequences of an action from the merely foreseen in a way that can be (...)
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  20. Alison Hills (2010). Utilitarianism, Contractualism and Demandingness. Philosophical Quarterly 60 (239):225-242.
    One familiar criticism of utilitarianism is that it is too demanding. It requires us to promote the happiness of others, even at the expense of our own projects, our integrity, or the welfare of our friends and family. Recently Ashford has defended utilitarianism, arguing that it provides compelling reasons for demanding duties to help the needy, and that other moral theories, notably contractualism, are committed to comparably stringent duties. In response, I argue that utilitarianism is even more demanding than (...)
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  21. Alison Hills (2008). Kantian Value Realism. Ratio 21 (2):182–200.
    Why should we be interested in Kant's ethical theory? One reason is that we find his views about our moral responsibilities appealing. Anyone who thinks that we should treat other people with respect, that we should not use them as a mere means in ways to which they could not possibly consent, will be attracted by a Kantian style of ethical theory. But according to recent supporters of Kant, the most distinctive and important feature of his ethical theory is not (...)
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  22.  60
    Alison Hills (2013). Faultless Moral Disagreement. Ratio 26 (4):410-427.
    Faultless disagreements are disagreements between two people, neither of whom has made a mistake or is at fault. It has been argued that there are faultless moral disagreements, that they cannot be accommodated by moral realism, and that in order to account for them, a form of relativism must be accepted. I argue that moral realism can accommodate faultless moral disagreement, provided that the phenomena is understood epistemically, and I give a brief defence of the relevant moral epistemology.
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  23.  9
    Thomas T. Hills, Mounir Maouene, Josita Maouene, Adam Sheya & Linda B. Smith (2008). Is There Preferential Attachment in the Growth of Early Semantic Noun Networks? In B. C. Love, K. McRae & V. M. Sloutsky (eds.), Proceedings of the 30th Annual Conference of the Cognitive Science Society. Cognitive Science Society
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  24.  18
    David Hills (forthcoming). The What and the How of Metaphorical Imagining, Part One. Philosophical Studies:1-19.
    We humans are remarkably interested in and skilled at games of make believe, games whose rules make what we are called on to imagine depend on what’s actually perceivably true about things and people that have what it takes to assume various fictional roles and that thereby function in the games as props. For the most part we play these games on an improvised pickup basis, working out the rules we play by in the very act of playing by them. (...)
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  25.  53
    Thomas T. Hills (2011). The Evolutionary Origins of Cognitive Control. Topics in Cognitive Science 3 (2):231-237.
    The question of domain-specific versus domain-general processing is an ongoing source of inquiry surrounding cognitive control. Using a comparative evolutionary approach, Stout (2010) proposed two components of cognitive control: coordinating hierarchical action plans and social cognition. This article reports additional molecular and experimental evidence supporting a domain-general attentional process coordinating hierarchical action plans, with the earliest such control processing originating in the capacity of dynamic foraging behaviors—predating the vertebrate-invertebrate divergence (c. 700 million years ago). Further discussion addresses evidence required for (...)
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  26. Alison Hills (2003). Defending Double Effect. Philosophical Studies 116 (2):133-152.
    According to the doctrine of double effect(DDE), there is a morally significantdifference between harm that is intended andharm that is merely foreseen and not intended.It is not difficult to explain why it is bad tointend harm as an end (you have a ``badattitude'' toward that harm) but it is hard toexplain why it is bad to intend harm as a meansto some good end. If you intend harm as a meansto some good end, you need not have a ``badattitude'' toward (...)
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  27.  1
    Thomas T. Hills, Mounir Maouene, Josita Maouene, Adam Sheya & Linda Smith (2009). Categorical Structure Among Shared Features in Networks of Early-Learned Nouns. Cognition 112 (3):381-396.
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  28.  56
    David Hills (2012). Metaphor. In Edward N. Zalta (ed.), The Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
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  29.  54
    Alison Hills (2005). Rational Nature as the Source of Value. Kantian Review 10 (1):60-81.
    The most prominent recent interpretations of Kantian ethics place rational nature at the centre of the theory: I must respect rational nature, whether in myself or in others, because rational nature has a special status as the source of all other values. It is not obvious what it is for something to be the source of value, nor whether rational nature could play this role, but until these issues are settled the coherence of Kantian ethics is in question. In this (...)
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  30.  12
    David Hills (2008). Problems of Paraphrase: Bottom's Dream. The Baltic International Yearbook of Cognition, Logic and Communication 3.
    Philosophers and critics alike often contend that metaphors cannot or should not be paraphrased, ever. Yet a simple and decisive empirical argument — The Horse’s Mouth Argument—suffices to show that many metaphors can be paraphrased without violating the spirit in which they were put forward in the first place. This argument leaves us with urgent unanswered questions about the role of paraphrase in a more inclusive division of exegetical labor, about the tension between its notorious openendedness and its claim to (...)
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  31.  3
    Tomas Engelthaler & Thomas T. Hills (2016). Feature Biases in Early Word Learning: Network Distinctiveness Predicts Age of Acquisition. Cognitive Science 40 (4).
    Do properties of a word's features influence the order of its acquisition in early word learning? Combining the principles of mutual exclusivity and shape bias, the present work takes a network analysis approach to understanding how feature distinctiveness predicts the order of early word learning. Distance networks were built from nouns with edge lengths computed using various distance measures. Feature distinctiveness was computed as a distance measure, showing how far an object in a network is from other objects based on (...)
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  32.  13
    Christopher Kalff, Thomas Hills & Jan M. Wiener (2010). Human Foraging Behavior: A Virtual Reality Investigation on Area Restricted Search in Humans. In S. Ohlsson & R. Catrambone (eds.), Proceedings of the 32nd Annual Conference of the Cognitive Science Society. Cognitive Science Society 168--173.
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  33.  30
    Alison Hills (2004). Is Ethics Rationally Required? Inquiry 47 (1):1 – 19.
    Sidgwick argued that utilitarianism was not rationally required because it could not be shown that a utilitarian theory of practical reason was better justified than a rival egoist theory of practical reason: there is a 'dualism of practical reason' between utilitarianism and egoism. In this paper, it is demonstrated that the dualism argument also applies to Kant's moral theory, the moral law. A prudential theory that is parallel to the moral law is devised, and it is argued that the moral (...)
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  34. Alison Hills (2007). Practical Reason, Value and Action. Journal of Moral Philosophy 4 (3):375-392.
    How should we decide which theory of practical reason is correct? One possibility is to link each conception of practical reason with a theory of value, and to assess the first in combination with the second. Recently some philosophers have taken a different approach. They have tried to link theories of practical reason with theories of action instead. I try to show that it can be illuminating to think of practical reason in terms of the success conditions of action, but (...)
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  35.  31
    Nasrin Shahinpoor & Bernard F. Matt (2007). The Power of One: Dissent and Organizational Life. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 74 (1):37 - 48.
    Over the last 20 years, organizations have attempted numerous innovations to create more openness and to increase ethical practice. However, adult students in business classes report that managers are generally bureaucratically oriented and averse to constructive criticism or principled dissent. When organizations oppose dissent, they suffer the consequences of mistakes that could be prevented and they create an unethical and toxic environment for individual employees. By distinguishing principled dissent from other forms of criticism and opposition, managers and leaders can perceive (...)
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  36.  8
    Adelma M. Hills (1993). The Motivational Bases of Attitudes Toward Animals. Society and Animals 1 (2):111-128.
    The need for a theoretical grounding of the human-animal relationship is addressed from the perspective of the motivational bases of attitudes toward animals. Building on recent developments in attitude theory, and integrating themes from the historical and cultural background to Western attitudes, a model is developed that proposes three fundamental motivational bases, where responses to animals depend on instrumental self interest, empathylidentification, or people's beliefs and values about the nature and status of animals. Initial empirical studies using the model revealed (...)
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  37. D. Hills (2009). Objects of Metaphor. Philosophical Review 118 (1):134-138.
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  38.  11
    Wai‐Tat Fu, Thomas Hills & Peter M. Todd (2015). Interfacing Mind and Environment: The Central Role of Search in Cognition. Topics in Cognitive Science 7 (3):384-390.
    Search can be found in almost every cognitive activity, ranging across vision, memory retrieval, problem solving, decision making, foraging, and social interaction. Because of its ubiquity, research on search has a tendency to fragment into multiple areas of cognitive science. The proposed topic aims at providing integrative discussion of the central role of search from multiple perspectives. We focus on controlled search processes, which require a goal, uncertainty about the nature, location, or acquisition method of the objects to be searched (...)
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  39.  28
    Alison Hills (2003). Duties and Duties to the Self. American Philosophical Quarterly 40 (2):131 - 142.
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  40.  4
    Him Cheung, Hsuan-Chih Chen, Chun Yip Lai, On Chi Wong & Melanie Hills (2001). The Development of Phonological Awareness: Effects of Spoken Language Experience and Orthography. Cognition 81 (3):227-241.
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  41. Alison Hills (2011). Moral Epistemology. In Michael Brady (ed.), New Waves in Metaethics. Palgrave Macmillan
     
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  42.  41
    Alison Hills (2003). The Significance of the Dualism of Practical Reason. Utilitas 15 (3):315.
    Sidgwick argued that utilitarianism and egoism were in conflict, that neither theory was better justified than the other, and concluded that there was a and all that remained to him was. The dualism argument introduced by Sidgwick is an extremely powerful sceptical argument that no theory of ethics is rationally required: it cannot be shown that a moral sceptic or an egoist ought to accept the moral theory, otherwise she is unreasonable. I explain two ways in which the significance of (...)
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  43.  37
    Jason L. Hills (2013). Pragmatism and Phenomenology. American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 87 (2):311-320.
    Scott Aikin recently claimed that pragmatism and phenomenology are incompatible. Pragmatic naturalism is incompatible with phenomenology’s anti-naturalism. Therefore, pragmatists trying to appropriate insights from phenomenology encounter a dilemma: either reject naturalism and thereby pragmatism, or reject anti-naturalism and thereby phenomenology. I will argue that Aikin’s dilemma is unmerited, especially in the case of John Dewey, because he has misidentified its horns. Given his definition of pragmatic naturalism, the classical pragmatists are neither naturalists nor pragmatists. His discussion of “phenomenology” misconstrues phenomenological (...)
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  44.  28
    Alison Hills (2009). Supervenience and Moral Realism. In Hieke Alexander & Leitgeb Hannes (eds.), Reduction, Abstraction, Analysis. Ontos Verlag 11--163.
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  45. Henry S. Richardson, Cécile Fabre, Joshua Glasgow, Alison Hills, Kieran Setiya & Hallie Rose Liberto (2009). 10. Neil MacCormick, Practical Reason in Law and Morality Neil MacCormick, Practical Reason in Law and Morality (Pp. 192-196). In John Hawthorne (ed.), Ethics. Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
     
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  46.  67
    Stanley Cavell & David Hills (1980). Cavell on Expression. Journal of Philosophy 77 (11):745-746.
  47.  56
    David Hills (2008). Response to Gut Reactions. [REVIEW] Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 76 (3):720–728.
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  48.  14
    Alison Hills (2007). The Principle of Right: Practical Reason and Justification in Kant's Ethical and Political Philosophy. Politics and Ethics Review 3 (1):24-36.
    The principle of right is Kant's main formulation of the rules of politics, and it has obvious affinities with the moral law. Do we have moral reasons to obey the principle? I argue that we may have moral reasons to obey the principle ourselves, but not coercively to enforce it. Do we have prudential reasons to obey the principle? I argue that we do not have reasons based on happiness, but that we may have prudential reasons of a wholly different, (...)
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  49.  58
    Alison Hills (2008). Value, Reason and Hedonism. Utilitas 20 (1):50-58.
    It is widely believed that we always have reason to maximize the good. Utilitarianism and other consequentialist theories depend on this conception of value. Scanlon has argued that this view of value is not generally correct, but that it is most plausible with regard to the value of pleasure, and may even be true at least of that. But there are reasons to think that even the value of pleasure is not teleological.
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  50.  4
    Thomas T. Hills & James S. Adelman (2015). Recent Evolution of Learnability in American English From 1800 to 2000. Cognition 143:87-92.
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