Search results for 'Matt Hills' (try it on Scholar)

993 found
Sort by:
  1. Matt Hills (2003). An Event-Based Definition of Art-Horror. In Steven Jay Schneider & Daniel Shaw (eds.), Dark Thoughts: Philosophic Reflections on Cinematic Horror. Scarecrow Press. 138--157.score: 240.0
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. Matt Hills, Deborah Knight & George McKnight (2003). Dallas and Critical Spectatorship, and a Manuscript in Progress, Aristotle on Essence and Human Nature. Cynthia A. Freeland is Associate Professor of Philosophy and Director of Women's Studies at the University of Houston. She has Published Widely on Topics in Ancient Philosophy and Aesthetics, is The. [REVIEW] In Steven Jay Schneider & Daniel Shaw (eds.), Dark Thoughts: Philosophic Reflections on Cinematic Horror. Scarecrow Press. 291.score: 240.0
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. Joanne Goss (2006). Review of Matt Hills, The Pleasures of Horror. [REVIEW] Film-Philosophy 10 (3).score: 150.0
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. Joanne Goss (2006). Matt Hills' The Pleasures of Horror. [REVIEW] Film-Philosophy 10 (3).score: 150.0
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. Alison Hills (2010/2012). The Beloved Self: Morality and the Challenge From Egoism. Oxford University Press.score: 60.0
    The Beloved Self is about the holy grail of moral philosophy, an argument against egoism that proves that we all have reasons to be moral. Part One introduces three different versions of egoism. Part Two looks at attempts to prove that egoism is false, and shows that even the more modest arguments that do not try to answer the egoist in her own terms seem to fail. But in part Three, Hills defends morality and develops a new problem for (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  6. Rosa Bruno-Jofré & George Hills (2011). Changing Visions of Excellence in Ontario School Policy: The Cases of Living and Learning and for the Love of Learning. Educational Theory 61 (3):335-349.score: 60.0
    In this essay, Rosa Bruno-Jofré and George Hills examine two major Ontario policy documents: 1968's Living and Learning and 1994's For the Love of Learning. The purpose is, first, to gain insight into the uses of the term “excellence” in the context of discourse about educational aims and evaluation, and, second, to explore how these uses may have changed over time. Bruno-Jofré and Hills employ the conceptual framework developed by Madhu Prakash and Leonard Waks to elucidate the varied (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  7. Alison Hills (2009). Moral Testimony and Moral Epistemology. Ethics 120 (1):94-127.score: 30.0
  8. Alison Hills (2010). Utilitarianism, Contractualism and Demandingness. Philosophical Quarterly 60 (239):225-242.score: 30.0
    One familiar criticism of utilitarianism is that it is too demanding. It requires us to promote the happiness of others, even at the expense of our own projects, our integrity, or the welfare of our friends and family. Recently Ashford has defended utilitarianism, arguing that it provides compelling reasons for demanding duties to help the needy, and that other moral theories, notably contractualism, are committed to comparably stringent duties. In response, I argue that utilitarianism is even more demanding than is (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  9. Alison Hills (2007). Intentions, Foreseen Consequences and the Doctrine of Double Effect. Philosophical Studies 133 (2):257 - 283.score: 30.0
    The difficulty of distinguishing between the intended and the merely foreseen consequences of actions seems to many to be the most serious problem for the doctrine of double effect. It has led some to reject the doctrine altogether, and has left some of its defenders recasting it in entirely different terms. I argue that these responses are unnecessary. Using Bratman’s conception of intention, I distinguish the intended consequences of an action from the merely foreseen in a way that can be (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  10. Alison Hills (2008). Kantian Value Realism. Ratio 21 (2):182–200.score: 30.0
    Why should we be interested in Kant's ethical theory? One reason is that we find his views about our moral responsibilities appealing. Anyone who thinks that we should treat other people with respect, that we should not use them as a mere means in ways to which they could not possibly consent, will be attracted by a Kantian style of ethical theory. But according to recent supporters of Kant, the most distinctive and important feature of his ethical theory is not (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  11. Alison Hills (2003). Defending Double Effect. Philosophical Studies 116 (2):133-152.score: 30.0
    According to the doctrine of double effect(DDE), there is a morally significantdifference between harm that is intended andharm that is merely foreseen and not intended.It is not difficult to explain why it is bad tointend harm as an end (you have a ``badattitude'' toward that harm) but it is hard toexplain why it is bad to intend harm as a meansto some good end. If you intend harm as a meansto some good end, you need not have a ``badattitude'' toward (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  12. Alison Hills (2007). Practical Reason, Value and Action. Journal of Moral Philosophy 4 (3):375-392.score: 30.0
    How should we decide which theory of practical reason is correct? One possibility is to link each conception of practical reason with a theory of value, and to assess the first in combination with the second. Recently some philosophers have taken a different approach. They have tried to link theories of practical reason with theories of action instead. I try to show that it can be illuminating to think of practical reason in terms of the success conditions of action, but (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  13. Stanley Cavell & David Hills (1980). Cavell on Expression. Journal of Philosophy 77 (11):745-746.score: 30.0
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  14. Alison Hills (2005). Rational Nature as the Source of Value. Kantian Review 10 (1):60-81.score: 30.0
  15. David Hills (2008). Response to Gut Reactions. [REVIEW] Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 76 (3):720–728.score: 30.0
    No categories
    Direct download (10 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  16. Alison Hills (2008). Value, Reason and Hedonism. Utilitas 20 (1):50-58.score: 30.0
    It is widely believed that we always have reason to maximize the good. Utilitarianism and other consequentialist theories depend on this conception of value. Scanlon has argued that this view of value is not generally correct, but that it is most plausible with regard to the value of pleasure, and may even be true at least of that. But there are reasons to think that even the value of pleasure is not teleological.
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  17. Alison Hills (2004). Is Ethics Rationally Required? Inquiry 47 (1):1 – 19.score: 30.0
    Sidgwick argued that utilitarianism was not rationally required because it could not be shown that a utilitarian theory of practical reason was better justified than a rival egoist theory of practical reason: there is a 'dualism of practical reason' between utilitarianism and egoism. In this paper, it is demonstrated that the dualism argument also applies to Kant's moral theory, the moral law. A prudential theory that is parallel to the moral law is devised, and it is argued that the moral (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  18. Nasrin Shahinpoor & Bernard F. Matt (2007). The Power of One: Dissent and Organizational Life. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 74 (1):37 - 48.score: 30.0
    Over the last 20 years, organizations have attempted numerous innovations to create more openness and to increase ethical practice. However, adult students in business classes report that managers are generally bureaucratically oriented and averse to constructive criticism or principled dissent. When organizations oppose dissent, they suffer the consequences of mistakes that could be prevented and they create an unethical and toxic environment for individual employees. By distinguishing principled dissent from other forms of criticism and opposition, managers and leaders can perceive (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  19. Alison Hills (2003). The Significance of the Dualism of Practical Reason. Utilitas 15 (03):315-.score: 30.0
    Sidgwick argued that utilitarianism and egoism were in conflict, that neither theory was better justified than the other, and concluded that there was a and all that remained to him was . The dualism argument introduced by Sidgwick is an extremely powerful sceptical argument that no theory of ethics is rationally required: it cannot be shown that a moral sceptic or an egoist ought to accept the moral theory, otherwise she is unreasonable. I explain two ways in which the significance (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  20. Gail Eynon, Nancy Thorley Hills & Kevin T. Stevens (1997). Factors That Influence the Moral Reasoning Abilities of Accountants: Implications for Universities and the Profession. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 16 (12-13):1297-1309.score: 30.0
    The need to maintain the public trust in the integrity of the accounting profession has led to increased interest in research that examines the moral reasoning abilities (MRA) of Certified Public Accountants (CPAs). This study examines the MRA of CPAs practicing in small firms or as sole practitioners and the factors that affect MRA throughout their working careers.The results indicate that small-firm accounting practitioners exhibit lower MRA than expected for professionals and that age, gender and socio-political beliefs affect the moral (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  21. David Hills (2007). Drawing Distinctions: The Varieties of Graphic Expression by Maynard, Patrick. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 65 (2):235–238.score: 30.0
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  22. David Hills (2002). Review of Van Gerwen, Rob (Ed.), Richard Wollheim on the Art of Painting: Art As Representation and Expression. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2002 (8).score: 30.0
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  23. Alison Hills (2006). Review of Elijah Millgram, Ethics Done Right: Practical Reasoning As a Foundation for Moral Theory. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2006 (3).score: 30.0
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  24. David Hills (1976). Reply to Gass. Journal of Philosophy 73 (19):739-742.score: 30.0
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  25. W. Sommer, H. Leuthold & J. Matt (1998). The Expectancies That Govern the P300 Amplitude Are Mostly Automatic and Unconscious. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 21 (1):149-150.score: 30.0
    We argue that probability effects on P300 amplitude are the product of an automatic frequency detector not subject to voluntary control and relatively inaccessible to consciousness. related to P300 therefore appear to be passive, perceptual ones. If probability-based expectancies do become conscious, they are inversely related to P300, supporting the view of Donchin & Coles (1988).
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  26. Elaine A. Hills (2011). John Aber, Tom Kelly and Bruce Mallory (Eds.): The Sustainable Learning Community: One University's Journey to the Future. [REVIEW] Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 24 (1):87-90.score: 30.0
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  27. Alison Hills (2009). Happiness in the Groundwork. In Jens Timmermann (ed.), Kant's Groundwork of the Metaphysics of Morals: A Critical Guide. Cambridge University Press.score: 30.0
  28. Christopher B. Hills (1968). Nuclear Evolution [a Guide to Cosmic Enlightenment]. London, Centre Community Publications.score: 30.0
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  29. Mark Timmons & Robert Johnson (eds.) (forthcoming). Value, Reason, and Respect: Kantian Themes From the Philosophy of Thomas E. Hill, Jr. Oxford.score: 24.0
    The book features chapters by Bernard and Jan Boxill, Robin S. Dillon, Stephen Darwall, Mark Schroeder, Jonathan Dancy, Onora O’Neill, Gerald Gaus, Jeffrie G. Murphy, Matt Zwolinski and David Schmidtz, Cheshire Calhoun, Marcia Baron, Andrews Reath, and Julia Driver that take up themes and arguments in Tom Hill’s work in ethics, social, political and legal philosophy, as well as his work on Kant’s ethics. The volume concludes with an essay by Tom Hill in which he reflects on how he (...)
    Translate to English
    |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  30. David Hills (forthcoming). Metaphor. Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.score: 20.0
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  31. Alison Hills (2013). Moral Testimony. Philosophy Compass 8 (6):552-559.score: 20.0
    Testimony is an important source of our knowledge about the world. But to some, there seems something odd, perhaps even wrong, about trusting testimony about specifically moral matters. In this paper, I discuss several different explanations of what might be wrong with trusting moral testimony. These include the possibility that there is no moral knowledge; that moral knowledge cannot be transmitted by moral testimony; that there are reasons not to trust moral testimony either because you should try to gain and (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  32. Alison Hills (2013). Faultless Moral Disagreement. Ratio 26 (4):410-427.score: 20.0
    Faultless disagreements are disagreements between two people, neither of whom has made a mistake or is at fault. It has been argued that there are faultless moral disagreements, that they cannot be accommodated by moral realism, and that in order to account for them, a form of relativism must be accepted. I argue that moral realism can accommodate faultless moral disagreement, provided that the phenomena is understood epistemically, and I give a brief defence of the relevant moral epistemology.
    No categories
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  33. David Hills (1997). Aptness and Truth in Verbal Metaphor. Philosophical Topics 25 (1):117-153.score: 20.0
  34. Thomas T. Hills (2011). The Evolutionary Origins of Cognitive Control. Topics in Cognitive Science 3 (2):231-237.score: 20.0
    The question of domain-specific versus domain-general processing is an ongoing source of inquiry surrounding cognitive control. Using a comparative evolutionary approach, Stout (2010) proposed two components of cognitive control: coordinating hierarchical action plans and social cognition. This article reports additional molecular and experimental evidence supporting a domain-general attentional process coordinating hierarchical action plans, with the earliest such control processing originating in the capacity of dynamic foraging behaviors—predating the vertebrate-invertebrate divergence (c. 700 million years ago). Further discussion addresses evidence required for (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  35. Alison Hills (2009). Book Reviews Scanlon, Thomas M. Moral Dimensions: Permissibility, Meaning, Blame . Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, Belknap Press, 2008. Pp. Xii+247. $29.95 (Cloth). [REVIEW] Ethics 119 (4):792-796.score: 20.0
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  36. Jason L. Hills (2013). Pragmatism and Phenomenology. American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 87 (2):311-320.score: 20.0
    Scott Aikin recently claimed that pragmatism and phenomenology are incompatible. Pragmatic naturalism is incompatible with phenomenology’s anti-naturalism. Therefore, pragmatists trying to appropriate insights from phenomenology encounter a dilemma: either reject naturalism and thereby pragmatism, or reject anti-naturalism and thereby phenomenology. I will argue that Aikin’s dilemma is unmerited, especially in the case of John Dewey, because he has misidentified its horns. Given his definition of pragmatic naturalism, the classical pragmatists are neither naturalists nor pragmatists. His discussion of “phenomenology” misconstrues phenomenological (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  37. Peter J. Hills, Magda A. Werno & Michael B. Lewis (2011). Sad People Are More Accurate at Face Recognition Than Happy People. Consciousness and Cognition 20 (4):1502-1517.score: 20.0
  38. Alison Hills (2003). Duties and Duties to the Self. American Philosophical Quarterly 40 (2):131 - 142.score: 20.0
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  39. Alison Hills (2006). Kant on Happiness and Reason. History of Philosophy Quarterly 23 (3):243 - 261.score: 20.0
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  40. D. Hills (2009). Objects of Metaphor. Philosophical Review 118 (1):134-138.score: 20.0
    No categories
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  41. Jason Hills (2012). Limited Horizons: The Habitual Basis of the Imagination. Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 48 (1):71-102.score: 20.0
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  42. Alison Hills (2009). Supervenience and Moral Realism. In Hieke Alexander & Leitgeb Hannes (eds.), Reduction, Abstraction, Analysis. Ontos Verlag. 11--163.score: 20.0
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  43. Mark W. Chase & Harold G. Hills (1992). Orchid Phylogeny, Flower Sexuality, and Fragrance-Seeking. BioScience 42 (1):43-49.score: 20.0
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  44. P. D. Hills (2001). Ennius, Suetonius and the Genesis of Horace, Odes 4. Classical Quarterly 51 (2):613-616.score: 20.0
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  45. Arthur B. Markman, Thomas T. Hills, Michael P. Kaschak, Jenny R. Saffran, Jarrod Moss, Kenneth Kotovsky, Jonathan Cagan, Louise Connell, Mark T. Keane & Joyca Pw Lacroix (2006). Subject Index to Volume 30. Cognitive Science 30:1129-1132.score: 20.0
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  46. Him Cheung, Hsuan-Chih Chen, Chun Yip Lai, On Chi Wong & Melanie Hills (2001). The Development of Phonological Awareness: Effects of Spoken Language Experience and Orthography. Cognition 81 (3):227-241.score: 20.0
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  47. Wayne D. Gray & Thomas Hills (2014). Does Cognition Deteriorate With Age or Is It Enhanced by Experience? Topics in Cognitive Science 6 (1):2-4.score: 20.0
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  48. Thomas T. Hills (2006). Animal Foraging and the Evolution of Goal‐Directed Cognition. Cognitive Science 30 (1):3-41.score: 20.0
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  49. Peter James Hills (2013). Aftereffects in Face Processing. Frontiers in Psychology 4.score: 20.0
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  50. Thomas Hills, Mounir Maouene, Josita Maouene, Adam Sheya & Linda B. Smith (2008). Categorical Structure in Early Semantic Networks of Nouns. In B. C. Love, K. McRae & V. M. Sloutsky (eds.), Proceedings of the 30th Annual Conference of the Cognitive Science Society. Cognitive Science Society.score: 20.0
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
1 — 50 / 993