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Matt King [12]Matthew King [9]Matthew J. King [1]
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Profile: Matt King (University of Alabama, Birmingham)
Profile: Matthew King (York University)
  1. Matt King, Manipulating Responsibility.
    Manipulation arguments have become almost a cottage industry in the moral responsibility literature. These cases are used for a variety of purposes, familiarly to undermine some proffered set of conditions on responsibility, usually compatibilist conditions. The basic idea is to conceive of a case which intuitively includes responsibility-undermining manipulation but which meets the target account’s set of sufficient conditions on responsibility. The manipulation thereby serves as a counterexample to the target theory. More specifically, recent concern with manipulation cases has often (...)
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  2. Matt King, Symmetry and Responsibility.
    IN THIS PAPER, I observe a set of symmetries exposed by examining cases of excused blameworthiness and mitigated praiseworthiness, and argue that a prominent contemporary approach to explaining moral responsibility is ill-suited to explaining why the symmetry obtains. The view I have in mind has a distinctive explanatory strategy: an agent S’s being responsible, on this view, is to be explained in terms of the appropriateness of holding S responsible. This explanatory strategy, whatever its other merits, cannot adequately explain the (...)
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  3. Matt King (2014). Two Faces of Desert. Philosophical Studies 169 (3):401-424.
    There are two broadly competing pictures of moral responsibility. On the view I favor, to be responsible for some action is to be related to it in such a way that licenses attributing certain properties to the agent, properties like blameworthiness and praiseworthiness. Responsibility is attributability. A different view understands being responsible in terms of our practices of holding each other responsible. Responsibility is accountability, which “involves a social setting in which we demand (require) certain conduct from one another and (...)
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  4. Matt King (2013). The Problem with Manipulation. Ethics 124 (1):65-83.
    It is often charged that compatibilists have a problem with manipulation. There are certain cases in which victims of manipulation seem to be not responsible for what they do, despite meeting compatibilist conditions on moral responsibility. This essay argues that these arguments, as a class, fail. Their success is depen- dent on a particular incompatibilist assumption, one that is dialectically infelici- tous in this context. My aim, however, is not to defend compatibilism but only to reject a popular argument for (...)
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  5. Matt King (2012). Moral Responsibility and Merit. Journal of Ethics and Social Philosophy 6 (2).
    In the contemporary moral responsibility debate, most theorists seem to be giving accounts of responsibility in the ‘desert-entailing sense’. Despite this agreement, little has been said about the notion of desert that is supposedly entailed. In this paper I propose an understanding of desert sufficient to help explain why the blameworthy and praiseworthy deserve blame and praise, respectively. I do so by drawing upon what might seem an unusual resource. I appeal to so-called Fitting-Attitude accounts of value to help inform (...)
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  6. Matt King (2012). Responsibility Relativised. The Philosophers' Magazine 58:121-122.
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  7. Matt King (2012). Traction Without Tracing: A (Partial) Solution for Control‐Based Accounts of Moral Responsibility. European Journal of Philosophy 21 (2):n/a-n/a.
    Control-based accounts of moral responsibility face a familiar problem. There are some actions which look like obvious cases of responsibility but which appear equally obviously to lack the requisite control. Drunk-driving cases are canonical instances. The familiar solution to this problem is to appeal to tracing. Though the drunk driver isn't in control at the time of the crash, this is because he previously drank to excess, an action over which he did plausibly exercise the requisite control. Tracing seeks to (...)
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  8. Matt King & Peter Carruthers (2012). Moral Responsibility and Consciousness. Journal of Moral Philosophy 9 (2):200-228.
    Our aim in this paper is to raise a question about the relationship between theories of responsibility, on the one hand, and a commitment to conscious attitudes, on the other. Our question has rarely been raised previously. Among those who believe in the reality of human freedom, compatibilists have traditionally devoted their energies to providing an account that can avoid any commitment to the falsity of determinism while successfully accommodating a range of intuitive examples. Libertarians, in contrast, have aimed to (...)
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  9. Matthew J. King, Lori-Anne Williams, Arlene G. MacDougall, Shelley Ferris, Julia R. V. Smith, Natalia Ziolkowski & Margaret C. McKinnon (2011). Patients with Bipolar Disorder Show a Selective Deficit in the Episodic Simulation of Future Events. Consciousness and Cognition 20 (4):1801-1807.
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  10. Matt King (2010). Appearances of the Good, by Sergio Tenenbaum. Mind 119 (473):249-253.
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  11. Matt King (2009). Review of Ishtiyaque Haji, Incompatibilism's Allure: Principal Arguments for Incompatibilism. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2009 (3).
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  12. Matt King (2009). The Problem with Negligence. Social Theory and Practice 35 (4):577-595.
    Ordinary morality judges agents blameworthy for negligently produced harms. In this paper I offer two main reasons for thinking that explaining just how negligent agents are responsible for the harms they produce is more problematic than one might think. First, I show that negligent conduct is characterized by the lack of conscious control over the harm, which conflicts with the ordinary view that responsibility for something requires at least some conscious control over it. Second, I argue that negligence is relevantly (...)
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  13. Matthew King (2009). Clarifying the Foucault—Habermas Debate: Morality, Ethics, and `Normative Foundations'. Philosophy and Social Criticism 35 (3):287-314.
    Habermas charges that Foucault's work `cannot account for its normative foundations'. Responses to Habermas have consisted mostly of, on one hand, attempts to identify foundational normative assumptions implicit in Foucault's work, and, on the other hand, attempts to show that Foucault's work discredits the very idea of normative foundations. These attempts have suffered from a lack of clarity about Habermas' notion of normative foundations. In this article I clarify the terms of the debate by considering Habermas' critique of Foucault in (...)
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  14. Matthew King (2009). Heidegger and Happiness: Dwelling on Fitting and Being. Continuum.
    If we were going to analyse the term 'happiness', we would want, for instance, to separate out its sense from those of ... We would be trying to determine just which phenomena count as happiness as opposed to something else, to decide ...
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  15. Matt King (2008). Robert Audi,Practical Reasoning and Ethical Decision:Practical Reasoning and Ethical Decision. Ethics 118 (4):717-721.
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  16. Matthew King (2008). The Glass Shatters and Ducks Turn Into Rabbits: Bad Faith and Moral Luck. Dialogue 47 (3-4):583-.
    ABSTRACT: This article shows how the "problem of moral luck" and Sartre's concept of "bad faith" are mutually illuminating, since both have to do with confusions about how much we control, or are controlled by, our situations. I agree with three recent proposals that the problem of moral luck results from certain epistemic malfunctions. However, I argue that the problem cannot be dissolved by overcoming these malfunctions because they are rooted in bad faith. Against the currently dominant interpretation, I argue (...)
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  17. Matthew King (2007). Heidegger's Etymological Method: Discovering Being by Recovering the Richness of the Word. Philosophy Today 51 (3):278-289.
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  18. Matthew King (2007). The Meno's Metaphilosophical Examples. Southern Journal of Philosophy 45 (3):395-412.
    I propose that an ill-appreciated contrast between the examples Socrates gives Meno, to show him how he ought to philosophize, is the key to understanding the Meno. I contend that Socrates prefers hisdefinitions of shape to his account of color because the former are concerned with what shape is, while the latter is concerned with how color comes to be. This contrast suggests that Plato intends ananalogous contrast between the (properly philosophical) way of inquiry that leads to Socrates’ definition of (...)
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  19. Matthew King (2003). Charles E. Scott, The Lives of Things Reviewed By. Philosophy in Review 23 (4):284-286.
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  20. Matthew King (2003). Moral Selfhood in the Liberal Tradition. The European Legacy 8 (2):209-212.
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