Search results for 'Matter Constitution' (try it on Scholar)

1000+ found
Order:
  1.  11
    A. Matter (1999). Hunger in America: A Matter. Social Research 66 (1).
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  2.  36
    Torsten Wilholt (2008). When Realism Made a Difference: The Constitution of Matter and its Conceptual Enigmas in Late 19th Century Physics. Studies in History and Philosophy of Modern Physics 39 (1):1-16.
    The late 19th century debate among German-speaking physicists about theoretical entities is often regarded as foreshadowing the scientific realism debate. This paper brings out differences between them by concentrating on the part of the earlier debate that was concerned with the conceptual consistency of the competing conceptions of matter—mainly, but not exclusively, of atomism. Philosophical antinomies of atomism were taken up by Emil Du Bois-Reymond in an influential lecture in 1872. Such challenges to the consistency of atomism had repercussions (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  3.  11
    William H. Kane (1935). Hylemorphism and the Recent Views of the Constitution of Matter. Proceedings of the American Catholic Philosophical Association 11:61-74.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  4.  3
    Mi Gyung Kim (1992). The Layers of Chemical Language, I: Constitution of Bodies V. Structure of Matter. History of Science 30:69-96.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  5. Torsten Wilholt (2008). When Realism Made a Difference: The Constitution of Matter and its Conceptual Enigmas in Late 19th Century Physics. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part B: Studies in History and Philosophy of Modern Physics 39 (1):1-16.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  6. M. G. Kim (1992). The Layers of Chemical Language, I: Constitution of Bodies V. Structure of Matter. History of Science 30 (1):69-96.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  7. Louis de Broglie (1939). Matter and Light. London, G. Allen & Unwin Ltd..
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  8.  25
    Henry Laycock (1989). Matter and Objecthood Disentangled. Dialogue 28 (01):17-.
    The concept of matter is not, I urge, reducible to the concept of an object. This is to be distingusihed from the counterintuitive Aristotelian claim that matter depends for its existence on objects which it constitutes.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  9.  21
    Travis Dumsday (2015). Atoms Vs. Extended Simples: Towards a Dispositionalist Reconciliation. Philosophia 43 (4):1023-1033.
    There are four main theories concerning the ultimate constitution of matter: atomism version 1, atomism version 2, the theory of gunk, and the theory of extended simples. These four theories are usually seen as diametrically opposed. Here I take a stab at ecumenism, and argue that atomism version 1 and the theory of extended simples can be reconciled and rendered compatible by reference to the reality of dispositions.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  10. Egidijus Jarašiūnas (2012). Qualitative and Quantitative Parameters of the Execution of Foreign Policy in the Lithuanian Constitution. Jurisprudence 19 (3):923-953.
    The present article analyses the qualitative and quantitative parameters of the execution of foreign policy in the Constitution of the Republic of Lithuania. It should be noted that the matters of foreign policy were on the brink of constitutional regulation for a long time. The powers of institutions of the state in the field of foreign relations were established laconically by the Constitutions of first and second “waves” of establishment of constitutionalism. It was argued that the choices of decisions (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  11.  25
    A. Huttemann (2004). What's Wrong with Microphysicalism. Routledge.
    Microphysicalism , the view that whole objects behave the way they do in virtue of the behavior of their constituent parts, is an influential contemporary view with a long philosophical and scientific heritage. In What's Wrong With Microphysicalism? Andreas Huttemann offers a fresh challenge to this view. Huttemann agrees with the microphysicalists that we can explain compound systems by explaining their parts, but claims that this does not entail that the parts determine the whole. At most, it shows that there (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   10 citations  
  12.  39
    Andreas Hüttemann (2004). What's Wrong with Microphysicalism? Routledge.
    Microphysicalism , the view that whole objects behave the way they do in virtue of the behavior of their constituent parts, is an influential contemporary view with a long philosophical and scientific heritage. In What's Wrong With Microphysicalism? Andreas Huttemann offers a fresh challenge to this view. Huttemann agrees with the microphysicalists that we can explain compound systems by explaining their parts, but claims that this does not entail that the parts determine the whole. At most, it shows that there (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  13. Benjamin L. Curtis & Harold W. Noonan (2015). Identity Over Time, Constitution and the Problem of Personal Identity. In Steven Miller (ed.), The Constitution of Phenomenal Consciousness: Toward a science and theory. John Benjamins Publishing Company 348-371.
    What am I? And what is my relationship to the thing I call ‘my body’? Thus each of us can pose for himself the philosophical problems of the nature of the self and the relationship between a person and his body. One answer to the question about the relationship between a person and the thing he calls ‘his body’ is that they are two things composed of the same matter at the same time (like a clay statue and the (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  14. John Griffiths (1947). A New Concept of the Atomic System. [Ansonia, Conn..
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  15. O. A. Nikolʹskiĭ (2004). Osnovy Korpuskuli͡arno-Polevoĭ Teorii. Karpov.
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  16. W. F. G. Swann (1934). The Architecture of the Universe. New York, the Macmillan Company.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  17.  11
    Jeroen Smid (forthcoming). Material Constitution is Ad Hoc. Erkenntnis:1-21.
    The idea that two objects can coincide—by sharing all their proper parts, or matter—yet be non-identical, results in the “Problem of Coincident Objects”: in what relation do objects stand if they are not identical but share all their proper parts? One solution is to introduce material constitution. In this paper, I argue that this is ad hoc since, first, this solution cannot be generalized to solve similar problems, and, second, there are pseudo cases of coincidence that should not (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  18. Stephen Barker (2009). Dispositional Monism, Relational Constitution and Quiddities. Analysis 69 (2):242-250.
    Let us call dispositional monism the view that all natural properties have their identities fixed purely by their dispositional features, that is, by the patterns of stimulus and response in which they participate. DM implies that natural properties are pure powers: things whose natures are fully identified by their roles in determining the potentialities of events to cause or be caused. As pure powers, properties are meant to lack quiddities in Black's sense. A property possesses a quiddity just in case (...)
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   7 citations  
  19. Tessa Jones, Amending and Defending Constitution.
    I begin by evaluating four theories: mereological essentialism, the occasional identity thesis, four-dimensionalism and the constitution view. I compare the solutions these theories offer to puzzles of material constitution with particular attention being paid to their treatment of Leibniz’s Law, the ontological status of objects and the distinction between objects and their matter. If a lump of clay constitutes a statue, the lump of clay and the statue are metaphysically distinct such that they are distinct kinds, but (...)
    Translate
      Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  20.  79
    Andy Clark (2010). Coupling, Constitution and the Cognitive Kind. In Richard Menary (ed.), The Extended Mind. MIT Press
    Adams and Aizawa, in a series of recent and forthcoming papers ((2001), (In Press), (This Volume)) seek to refute, or perhaps merely to terminally embarrass, the friends of the extended mind. One such paper begins with the following illustration: "Question: Why did the pencil think that 2+2=4? Clark's Answer: Because it was coupled to the mathematician" Adams and Aizawa (this volume) ms p.1 "That" the authors continue "about sums up what is wrong with Clark's extended mind hypothesis". The example of (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  21.  73
    David Simpson (1992). Communicative Skills in the Constitution of Illocutionary Acts. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 70 (1):82 – 92.
    Austin's distinction between locutionary and illocutionary acts has offered a fruitful way of focussing the relation between language and communication. In particular, by adopting the distinction we attend to linguistic and communicative subjects as actors, not just processors or conduits of information. Yet in many attempts to explicate the constitution of illocutionary acts the subject as actor is subsumed within the role of linguistic rules or conventions. I propose an account of illocutionary acts in which rules or conventions are (...)
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  22.  3
    Pavlos Eleftheriadis (2007). The Idea of a European Constitution. Oxford Journal of Legal Studies 27 (1):1-21.
    Any abstract account of a field of law must make generalizations that are both faithful to the legal materials and appropriate to the subject matter's aims. The uniqueness and fluidity of the European Union's institutions makes such generalizations very difficult. A common theoretical approach to EU law (one that is often relied upon by the Court of Justice, the Parliament and the Commission) is to borrow directly from the theory of domestic constitutional law. The most recent manifestation of this (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  23.  54
    William Lane Craig (2005). Does the Problem of Material Constitution Illuminate the Doctrine of the Trinity? Faith and Philosophy 22 (1):77-86.
    Michael Rea and Jeffery Brower have offered a provocative new model of the Trinity on the analogy of the Aristotelian solution to the problem of material constitution. Just as a fist and a hand can be distinct entities composed of a common matter and yet numerically the same object, so the persons of the Trinity can be distinct entities (persons) composed of a common "matter" (the divine essence) and yet numerically the same object (God). I express doubts (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  24.  5
    J. N. Findlay (1977). The Constitution of Human Values. Royal Institute of Philosophy Lectures 11:189-207.
    The present paper is an attempt to study the acts and intentions which set up for the subject, and for the community of subjects, a set of values and disvalues which impose themselves as valid upon everyone, and which everyone must tend to prescribe, or to warn against, for everyone. The acts which set up a formal apophantic and ontology have been studied by Husserl in his Formal and Transcendental Logic , but he has not set out a comparable theory (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  25.  13
    Hagit Benbaji (2008). Material Objects, Constitution, and Mysterianism. Southern Journal of Philosophy 46 (1):1-26.
    It is sometimes claimed that ordinary objects, such as mountains and chairs, are not material in their own right, but only in virtue of the fact that they are constituted by matter. As Fine puts it, they are “onlyderivatively material”. In this paper I argue that invoking “constitution” to account for the materiality of things that are not material in their own right explains nothing and renders the admission that these objects are indeed material completely mysterious. Although there (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  26.  10
    Ingrid Albrecht, Love, Self-Constitution, and Practical Necessity.
    My dissertation, “Love, Self-Constitution, and Practical Necessity,” offers an interpretation of love between people. Love is puzzling because it appears to involve essentially both rational and non-rational phenomena. We are accountable to those we love, so love seems to participate in forms of necessity, commitment, and expectation, which are associated with morality. But non-rational attitudes—forms of desire, attraction, and feeling—are also central to love. Consequently, love is not obviously based in rationality or inclination. In contrast to views that attempt (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  27. Christopher Zurn, V. Disagreement and the Constitution of Democracy.
    Perhaps we should change our focus from constitutionalized practices of democracy to democratized practices of constitutionalism. Dworkin and Perry both seek to respond to democratic objections to judicial review by relying on a theory of the legitimacy constraints of democracy itself. According to this view, on some matters, legitimate democracy requires getting the right moral answers. Thus democratic processes must be constitutionalized to ensure such right outcomes on fundamental moral matters. To the extent that judges are better positioned to engage (...)
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  28.  13
    Hagit Benbaji (2008). Material Objects, Constitution, and Mysterianism. Southern Journal of Philosophy 46 (1):1-26.
    It is sometimes claimed that ordinary objects, such as mountains and chairs, are not material in their own right, but only in virtue of the fact that they are constituted by matter. As Fine puts it, they are “onlyderivatively material” (2003, 211). In this paper I argue that invoking “constitution” to account for the materiality of things that are not material in their own right explains nothing and renders the admission that these objects are indeed material completely mysterious. (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  29.  4
    Robert A. Sedler, The Constitution, the Courts and the Common Law.
    This article maintains that it is the constitutional responsibility of the courts, here the courts of the State of Michigan, to engage in judicial policymaking in the process of formulating common law rules. The article is written in response to the views expressed by some Justices of the Michigan Supreme Court that separation of powers concerns should impose significant limits on the power of the courts to establish and develop the common law of Michigan. Specifically, the contention is that policymaking (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  30.  1
    Lieve Boeve (2006). De Crisis in Europa: Een Zaak van Geloof of Ongeloof?-Europe's Crisis: A Matter of Belief and Disbelief? Bijdragen 67 (2):152-179.
    Europe’s Crisis – A Matter of Belief and Disbelief? Perspectives from the Vatican For Joseph Ratzinger, elected Pope Benedict XVI in 2005, Europe is a continent in crisis. Indeed he goes even further to suggest a link between the socio-cultural crisis of modern society and the crisis facing the Christian faith in Europe. Modernity has transformed Europe into a continent without God and at the same time has undermined the influence of Christian faith and tradition. As a result, the (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  31. Dermot Moran (2013). ‘There Is No Brute World, Only An Elaborated World’: Merleau-Ponty on the Intersubjective Constitution of the World. South African Journal of Philosophy 32 (4):355-371.
    In his later works, Merleau-Ponty proposes the notion of ‘the flesh’ as a new ‘element’, as he put it, in his ontological monism designed to overcome the legacy of Cartesian dualism with its bifurcation of all things into matter or spirit. Most Merleau-Ponty commentators recognise that Merleau-Ponty’s notion of ‘flesh’ is inspired by Edmund Husserl’s conceptions of ‘lived body’ and ‘vivacity’ or ‘liveliness’ . But it is not always recognised that, for Merleau-Ponty, the constitution of the world of (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  32. Michael C. Rea (ed.) (1997). Material Constitution: A Reader. Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
    The only anthology available on material constitution, this book collects important recent work on well known puzzles in metaphysics and philosophy of mind. The extensive, clearly written introduction helps to make the essays accessible to a wide audience.
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   12 citations  
  33.  62
    Bryan Pickel (2010). There is No 'Is' of Constitution. Philosophical Studies 147 (2):193 - 211.
    I defend the view that ordinary objects like statues are identical to the pieces of matter from which they are made. I argue that ordinary speakers assert sentences such as ‘this statue is a molded piece of clay’. This suggests that speakers believe propositions which entail that ordinary objects such as statues are the pieces matter from which they are made, and therefore pluralism contradicts ordinary beliefs. The dominant response to this argument purports to find an ambiguity in (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  34.  45
    P. M. S. Hacker (1979). Substance: The Constitution of Reality. Midwest Studies in Philosophy 4 (1):239-261.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  35. Michael B. Burke (1992). Copper Statues and Pieces of Copper: A Challenge to the Standard Account. Analysis 52 (1):12 - 17.
    On the most popular account of material constitution, it is common for a material object to coincide precisely with one or more other material objects, ones that are composed of just the same matter but differ from it in sort. I argue that there is nothing that could ground the alleged difference in sort and that the account must be rejected.
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   25 citations  
  36.  26
    Paul Kalligas (2011). The Structure of Appearances: Plotinus on the Constitution of Sensible Objects. Philosophical Quarterly 61 (245):762-782.
    Plotinus describes sensible objects as conglomerations of qualities and matter. However, none of these ingredients seems capable of accounting for the structure underlying the formation of each sensible object so as to constitute an identifiable and discrete entity. This is the effect of the logos, the organizing formative principle inherent in each object, which determines how its qualitative constituents are brought together to form a coherent unity. How the logos operates differs in various kinds of entities, such as living (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  37.  1
    Gabriele De Anna (2015). Hylomorphism and Substantial Gradualism. Revista Portuguesa de Filosofia 71 (4):855-872.
    Resumo Recentemente o Hilemorfismo – a visão tradicional, segundo a qual, as substâncias são constituídas pela combinação de forma e matéria – tem sido alvo de renovado interesse. Este artigo centra-se na substância material e sugere que, neste caso, a constituição hilemórfica exige uma noção de forma que deve ser alargada ao conceito de energia, ou ao exercício de uma força. Neste artigo também se defende o gradualismo substancial: se a forma for assim entendida, a substancialidade possui graus, ou seja, (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  38.  8
    F. M. Cornford (1930). Anaxagoras' Theory of Matter—II. Classical Quarterly 24 (2):83-95.
    The earlier part of this paper yielded the result that the assertion ‘A portion of everything in everything’ has no place or function in the explanation of any sort of apparent ‘becoming’ or change. This conclusion is important because, ever since Aristotle, it has been assumed that the assertion was made in order to explain away becoming and change. But if , according to the best evidence, becoming and such sorts of change as Anaxagoras considered can be explained away without (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  39.  10
    Richard A. Epstein (2011). Can We Design an Optimal Constitution? Of Structural Ambiguity and Rights Clarity. Social Philosophy and Policy 28 (1):290-324.
    The design of new constitutions is fraught with challenges on both issues of structural design and individual rights. As both a descriptive and normative matter it is exceedingly difficult to believe that one structural solution will fit all cases. The high variation in nation size, economic development, and ethnic division can easily tilt the balance for or against a Presidential or Parliamentary system, and even within these two broad classes the differences in constitutional structure are both large and hard (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  40.  6
    Maria Chiara Pievatolo (2013). Scandalum acceptum e scandalum datum: il non-intervenzionismo di Kant nel quinto articolo preliminare della Pace perpetua. Scienza and Politica. Per Una Storia Delle Dottrine 25 (48).
    Is it right to wage war to export democracy, or - as Kant would have said - to forcibly interfere in the constitution and in the government of another state with the goal of transforming it into a republic? The answer of Kant, contained in the fifth preliminary article of the Perpetual Peace, leans towards non-interventionism: a bad constitution can never justify a war, because it may be the root only of a scandalum acceptum. To understand the meaning (...)
    Translate
      Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  41.  2
    Paddy Dolan (2010). Space, Time and the Constitution of Subjectivity: Comparing Elias and Foucault. Foucault Studies 8:8-27.
    The work of Foucault and Elias has been compared before in the social sciences and humanities, but here I argue that the main distinction between their approaches to the construction of subjectivity is the relative importance of space and time in their accounts. This is not just a matter of the “history of ideas,” as providing for the temporal dimension more fully in theories of subjectivity and the habitus allows for a greater understanding of how ways of being, acting (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  42.  1
    Roberto Gronda (2013). From Methodology to Ontology: Interdisciplinarity as a Principle of Constitution of Objectivity—Reflections From the Study of American Philosophy. History of European Ideas 40 (4):1-16.
    The idea of interdisciplinarity can be articulated in different ways. The aim of the article is to criticise the view that interdisciplinarity is to be treated as a quality of the historian's approach to his subject-matter, and to argue for a constructivist interpretation of that notion. A constructivist account of interdisciplinarity relies on the thesis that the latter is one of the manifold ways in which it is possible to give sense to the historical records of which the historian (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  43. Melissa Lane (2015). CHAPTER 2. Constitution. In The Birth of Politics: Eight Greek and Roman Political Ideas and Why They Matter. Princeton University Press 57-92.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  44. Lynne Rudder Baker (2000). Persons and Bodies: A Constitution View. Cambridge University Press.
    What is a human person, and what is the relation between a person and his or her body? In her third book on the philosophy of mind, Lynne Rudder Baker investigates what she terms the person/body problem and offers a detailed account of the relation between human persons and their bodies. Baker's argument is based on the 'Constitution View' of persons and bodies, which aims to show what distinguishes persons from all other beings and to show how we can (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   108 citations  
  45.  42
    Axel Gelfert (2015). Between Rigor and Reality: Many-Body Models in Condensed Matter Physics. In Brigitte Falkenburg & Margaret Morrison (eds.), Why More Is Different: Philosophical Issues in Condensed Matter Physics and Complex Systems. Springer 201-226.
    The present paper focuses on a particular class of models intended to describe and explain the physical behaviour of systems that consist of a large number of interacting particles. Such many-body models are characterized by a specific Hamiltonian (energy operator) and are frequently employed in condensed matter physics in order to account for such phenomena as magnetism, superconductivity, and other phase transitions. Because of the dual role of many-body models as models of physical sys-tems (with specific physical phenomena as (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  46. Max Velmans (2007). The Co-Evolution of Matter and Consciousness. Velmans, Prof Max (2007) the Co-Evolution of Matter and Consciousness. [Journal (Paginated)] 44 (2):273-282.
    Theories about the evolution of consciousness relate in an intimate way to theories about the distribution of consciousness, which range from the view that only human beings are conscious to the view that all matter is in some sense conscious. Broadly speaking, such theories can be classified into discontinuity theories and continuity theories. Discontinuity theories propose that consciousness emerged only when material forms reached a given stage of evolution, but propose different criteria for the stage at which this occurred. (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  47.  18
    S. Orestis Palermos (2014). Loops, Constitution and Cognitive Extension. Cognitive Systems Research 27:25-41.
    The ‘causal-constitution’ fallacy, the ‘cognitive bloat’ worry, and the persisting theoretical confusion about the fundamental difference between the hypotheses of embedded (HEMC) and extended (HEC) cognition are three interrelated worries, whose common point—and the problem they accentuate—is the lack of a principled criterion of constitution. Attempting to address the ‘causal-constitution’ fallacy, mathematically oriented philosophers of mind have previously suggested that the presence of non-linear relations between the inner and the outer contributions is sufficient for cognitive extension. The (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   13 citations  
  48.  13
    Joël Dolbeault (2012). From Mind to Matter: How Bergson Anticipated Quantum Ideas. Mind and Matter 10 (1):25-45.
    In his book Matter and Memory of 1896, Bergson anticipated the quantum conception of matter: the idea that particles have a holistic nature, that matter is not substantial, that the movement and the position of a body cannot be determined simultaneously, and that physical processes do not obey a strict necessity. Surprisingly, he drew these conclusions from a reflection about the relation between mind and matter, in particular from his idea that perception is a relative coincidence (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  49. Henri Bergson (1991). Matter and Memory. MIT Press.
    A monumental work by an important modern philosopher, Matter and Memory (1896) represents one of the great inquiries into perception and memory, movement and time, matter and mind. Nobel Prize-winner Henri Bergson surveys these independent but related spheres, exploring the connection of mind and body to individual freedom of choice. Bergson’s efforts to reconcile the facts of biology to a theory of consciousness offered a challenge to the mechanistic view of nature, and his original and innovative views exercised (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   89 citations  
  50. David S. Oderberg (2007). Real Essentialism. Routledge.
    Contemporary essentialism and real essentialism -- Against modalism -- Reductionism : the illusory search for inner constitution -- Why real essentialism? -- Some varieties of anti-essentialism -- Empiricist anti-essentialism -- Quinean animadversions -- Popper : avoiding what-is questions -- Wittgenstein : the shadow of grammar -- The reality and knowability of essence -- Why essences are real -- The problem of the universal accidental -- An empirical test for essence? -- Coming to know essence -- Paradigms, stereotypes, and classification (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   27 citations  
1 — 50 / 1000