Search results for 'Matter Constitution' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. A. Matter (1999). Hunger in America: A Matter. Social Research 66 (1).score: 80.0
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  2. Torsten Wilholt (2008). When Realism Made a Difference: The Constitution of Matter and its Conceptual Enigmas in Late 19th Century Physics. Studies in History and Philosophy of Modern Physics 39 (1):1-16.score: 78.0
    The late 19th century debate among German-speaking physicists about theoretical entities is often regarded as foreshadowing the scientific realism debate. This paper brings out differences between them by concentrating on the part of the earlier debate that was concerned with the conceptual consistency of the competing conceptions of matter—mainly, but not exclusively, of atomism. Philosophical antinomies of atomism were taken up by Emil Du Bois-Reymond in an influential lecture in 1872. Such challenges to the consistency of atomism had repercussions (...)
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  3. Henry Laycock (1989). Matter and Objecthood Disentangled. Dialogue 28 (01):17-.score: 78.0
    The concept of matter is not, I urge, reducible to the concept of an object. This is to be distingusihed from the counterintuitive Aristotelian claim that matter depends for its existence on objects which it constitutes.
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  4. Louis de Broglie (1939). Matter and Light. London, G. Allen & Unwin Ltd..score: 78.0
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  5. Michael C. Rea (ed.) (1997). Material Constitution. Rowman & Littlefield.score: 78.0
     
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  6. Mi Gyung Kim (1992). The Layers of Chemical Language, I: Constitution of Bodies V. Structure of Matter. History of Science 30:69-96.score: 72.0
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  7. William H. Kane (1935). Hylemorphism and the Recent Views of the Constitution of Matter. Proceedings of the American Catholic Philosophical Association 11:61-74.score: 72.0
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  8. Andreas Hüttemann (2004). What's Wrong with Microphysicalism? Routledge.score: 60.0
    Microphysicalism , the view that whole objects behave the way they do in virtue of the behavior of their constituent parts, is an influential contemporary view with a long philosophical and scientific heritage. In What's Wrong With Microphysicalism? Andreas Huttemann offers a fresh challenge to this view. Huttemann agrees with the microphysicalists that we can explain compound systems by explaining their parts, but claims that this does not entail that the parts determine the whole. At most, it shows that there (...)
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  9. A. Huttemann (2004). What's Wrong with Microphysicalism. Routledge.score: 60.0
    Microphysicalism , the view that whole objects behave the way they do in virtue of the behavior of their constituent parts, is an influential contemporary view with a long philosophical and scientific heritage. In What's Wrong With Microphysicalism? Andreas Huttemann offers a fresh challenge to this view. Huttemann agrees with the microphysicalists that we can explain compound systems by explaining their parts, but claims that this does not entail that the parts determine the whole. At most, it shows that there (...)
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  10. John Griffiths (1947). A New Concept of the Atomic System. [Ansonia, Conn..score: 60.0
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  11. O. A. Nikolʹskiĭ (2004). Osnovy Korpuskuli͡arno-Polevoĭ Teorii. Karpov.score: 60.0
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  12. W. F. G. Swann (1934). The Architecture of the Universe. New York, the Macmillan Company.score: 60.0
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  13. Egidijus Jarašiūnas (2012). Qualitative and Quantitative Parameters of the Execution of Foreign Policy in the Lithuanian Constitution. Jurisprudence 19 (3):923-953.score: 54.0
    The present article analyses the qualitative and quantitative parameters of the execution of foreign policy in the Constitution of the Republic of Lithuania. It should be noted that the matters of foreign policy were on the brink of constitutional regulation for a long time. The powers of institutions of the state in the field of foreign relations were established laconically by the Constitutions of first and second “waves” of establishment of constitutionalism. It was argued that the choices of decisions (...)
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  14. Andy Clark (2010). Coupling, Constitution and the Cognitive Kind. In Richard Menary (ed.), The Extended Mind. Mit Press.score: 42.0
    Adams and Aizawa, in a series of recent and forthcoming papers ((2001), (In Press), (This Volume)) seek to refute, or perhaps merely to terminally embarrass, the friends of the extended mind. One such paper begins with the following illustration: "Question: Why did the pencil think that 2+2=4? Clark's Answer: Because it was coupled to the mathematician" Adams and Aizawa (this volume) ms p.1 "That" the authors continue "about sums up what is wrong with Clark's extended mind hypothesis". The example of (...)
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  15. Bryan Pickel (2010). There is No 'Is' of Constitution. Philosophical Studies 147 (2):193 - 211.score: 42.0
    I defend the view that ordinary objects like statues are identical to the pieces of matter from which they are made. I argue that ordinary speakers assert sentences such as ‘this statue is a molded piece of clay’. This suggests that speakers believe propositions which entail that ordinary objects such as statues are the pieces matter from which they are made, and therefore pluralism contradicts ordinary beliefs. The dominant response to this argument purports to find an ambiguity in (...)
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  16. Andy Clark (2005). Coupling, Constitution and the Cognitive Kind: A Reply to Adams and Aizawa. In Richard Menary (ed.), The Extended Mind. Ashgate.score: 42.0
    Adams and Aizawa, in a series of recent and forthcoming papers ((2001), (In Press), (This Volume)) seek to refute, or perhaps merely to terminally embarrass, the friends of the extended mind. One such paper begins with the following illustration: "Question: Why did the pencil think that 2+2=4? Clark's Answer: Because it was coupled to the mathematician" Adams and Aizawa (this volume) ms p.1 "That" the authors continue "about sums up what is wrong with Clark's extended mind hypothesis". The example of (...)
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  17. William Lane Craig (2005). Does the Problem of Material Constitution Illuminate the Doctrine of the Trinity? Faith and Philosophy 22 (1):77-86.score: 42.0
    Michael Rea and Jeffery Brower have offered a provocative new model of the Trinity on the analogy of the Aristotelian solution to the problem of material constitution. Just as a fist and a hand can be distinct entities composed of a common matter and yet numerically the same object, so the persons of the Trinity can be distinct entities (persons) composed of a common "matter" (the divine essence) and yet numerically the same object (God). I express doubts (...)
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  18. Christopher Zurn, V. Disagreement and the Constitution of Democracy.score: 42.0
    Perhaps we should change our focus from constitutionalized practices of democracy to democratized practices of constitutionalism. Dworkin and Perry both seek to respond to democratic objections to judicial review by relying on a theory of the legitimacy constraints of democracy itself. According to this view, on some matters, legitimate democracy requires getting the right moral answers. Thus democratic processes must be constitutionalized to ensure such right outcomes on fundamental moral matters. To the extent that judges are better positioned to engage (...)
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  19. Hagit Benbaji (2008). Material Objects, Constitution, and Mysterianism. Southern Journal of Philosophy 46 (1):1-26.score: 42.0
    It is sometimes claimed that ordinary objects, such as mountains and chairs, are not material in their own right, but only in virtue of the fact that they are constituted by matter. As Fine puts it, they are “onlyderivatively material” (2003, 211). In this paper I argue that invoking “constitution” to account for the materiality of things that are not material in their own right explains nothing and renders the admission that these objects are indeed material completely mysterious. (...)
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  20. Tessa Jones, Amending and Defending Constitution.score: 42.0
    I begin by evaluating four theories: mereological essentialism, the occasional identity thesis, four-dimensionalism and the constitution view. I compare the solutions these theories offer to puzzles of material constitution with particular attention being paid to their treatment of Leibniz’s Law, the ontological status of objects and the distinction between objects and their matter. If a lump of clay constitutes a statue, the lump of clay and the statue are metaphysically distinct such that they are distinct kinds, but (...)
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  21. Robert A. Sedler, The Constitution, the Courts and the Common Law.score: 42.0
    This article maintains that it is the constitutional responsibility of the courts, here the courts of the State of Michigan, to engage in judicial policymaking in the process of formulating common law rules. The article is written in response to the views expressed by some Justices of the Michigan Supreme Court that separation of powers concerns should impose significant limits on the power of the courts to establish and develop the common law of Michigan. Specifically, the contention is that policymaking (...)
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  22. Pavlos Eleftheriadis (2007). The Idea of a European Constitution. Oxford Journal of Legal Studies 27 (1):1-21.score: 42.0
    Any abstract account of a field of law must make generalizations that are both faithful to the legal materials and appropriate to the subject matter's aims. The uniqueness and fluidity of the European Union's institutions makes such generalizations very difficult. A common theoretical approach to EU law (one that is often relied upon by the Court of Justice, the Parliament and the Commission) is to borrow directly from the theory of domestic constitutional law. The most recent manifestation of this (...)
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  23. Maria Chiara Pievatolo (2013). Scandalum acceptum e scandalum datum: il non-intervenzionismo di Kant nel quinto articolo preliminare della Pace perpetua. Scienza and Politica. Per Una Storia Delle Dottrine 25 (48).score: 36.0
    Is it right to wage war to export democracy, or - as Kant would have said - to forcibly interfere in the constitution and in the government of another state with the goal of transforming it into a republic? The answer of Kant, contained in the fifth preliminary article of the Perpetual Peace, leans towards non-interventionism: a bad constitution can never justify a war, because it may be the root only of a scandalum acceptum. To understand the meaning (...)
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  24. Beau Breslin (2009). From Words to Worlds: Exploring Constitutional Functionality. Johns Hopkins University Press.score: 34.0
    In the 225 years since the United States Constitution was first drafted, no single book has addressed the key questions of what constitutions are designed to do, how they are structured, and why they matter. In From Words to Worlds, constitutional scholar Beau Breslin corrects this glaring oversight, singling out the essential functions that a modern, written constitution must incorporate in order to serve as a nation's fundamental law. Breslin lays out and explains the basic functions of (...)
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  25. Kirsty Duncanson (2011). 'We the People of the United States…': The Matrix and the Realisation of Constitutional Sovereignty. [REVIEW] International Journal for the Semiotics of Law - Revue Internationale de Sémiotique Juridique 24 (4):385-404.score: 34.0
    In its enunciation of “We the people,” the Constitution of the United States of America becomes a constitution of the flesh as it simultaneously invokes a constitution, a nation and a people. Correspondingly, its amendments as a list of rights pertaining to sex and race discrimination, and freedoms of bodily movement and action, assert the Constitution’s authority through the evocation of “natural” human bodies. In this article, I explore the way in which a sovereignty of the (...)
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  26. P. M. S. Hacker (1979). Substance: The Constitution of Reality. Midwest Studies in Philosophy 4 (1):239-261.score: 30.0
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  27. Paul Kalligas (2011). The Structure of Appearances: Plotinus on the Constitution of Sensible Objects. Philosophical Quarterly 61 (245):762-782.score: 30.0
    Plotinus describes sensible objects as conglomerations of qualities and matter. However, none of these ingredients seems capable of accounting for the structure underlying the formation of each sensible object so as to constitute an identifiable and discrete entity. This is the effect of the logos, the organizing formative principle inherent in each object, which determines how its qualitative constituents are brought together to form a coherent unity. How the logos operates differs in various kinds of entities, such as living (...)
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  28. Judith W. Decew (1987). Defending the “Private” in Constitutional Privacy. Journal of Value Inquiry 21 (3):171-184.score: 30.0
    Suppose we agree to reject the view that privacy has narrow scope and consequently is irrelevant to the constitutional privacy cases. We then have (at least) these two options: (1) We might further emphasize and draw out similarities between tort and constitutional privacy claims in order to develop a notion of privacy fundamental to informational and Fourth Amendment privacy concerns as well as the constitutional cases. We can cite examples indicating this is a promising position. Consider consenting homosexuality conducted in (...)
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  29. Rosa Nidia Buenfil Burgos (2004). Negativity: A Disturbing Constitutive Matter in Education. Journal of Philosophy of Education 38 (3):429–440.score: 30.0
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  30. Karen François (2011). In-Between Science and Politics. Foundations of Science 16 (2):161-171.score: 28.0
    This paper gives a philosophical outline of the initial foundations of politics as presented in the work of Plato and argues why this traditional philosophical approach can no longer serve as the foundation of politics. The argumentation is mainly based on the work of Latour (1993, 1997, 1999a, 2004, 2005, 2007, 2008) and consists of five parts. In the first section I elaborate on the initial categorization of politics and science as represented by Plato in his Republic. In the second (...)
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  31. Lynne Rudder Baker (2005). When Does a Person Begin? Social Philosophy and Policy 22 (2):25-48.score: 24.0
    According to the Constitution View of persons, a human person is wholly constituted by (but not identical to) a human organism. This view does justice both to our similarities to other animals and to our uniqueness. As a proponent of the Constitution View, I defend the thesis that the coming-into-existence of a human person is not simply a matter of the coming-into-existence of an organism, even if that organism ultimately comes to constitute a person. Marshalling some support (...)
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  32. P. M. S. Hacker (2009). Philosophy: A Contribution, Not to Human Knowledge, but to Human Understanding. Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 84 (65):129-.score: 24.0
    P. M. S. Hacker 1. The poverty of philosophy as a science Throughout its history philosophy has been thought to be a member of a community of intellectual disciplines united by their common pursuit of knowledge. It has sometimes been thought to be the queen of the sciences, at other times merely their under-labourer. But irrespective of its social status, it was held to be a participant in the quest for knowledge – a cognitive discipline. Cognitive disciplines may be a (...)
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  33. Paul Needham (2010). Transient Things and Permanent Stuff. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 88 (1):147 – 166.score: 24.0
    A view of individuals as constituted of quantities of matter, both understood as continuants enduring over time, is elaborated in some detail. Constitution is a three-place relation which can't be collapsed to identity because of the place-holder for a time and because individuals and quantities of matter have such a radically different character. Individuals are transient entities with limited lifetimes, whereas quantities are permanent existents undergoing change in physical and chemical properties from time to time. Coincidence, considered (...)
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  34. Simon Beck (2008). Going Narrative: Schechtman and the Russians. South African Journal of Philosophy 27 (2):69-79.score: 24.0
    Marya Schechtman's The Constitution of Selves presented an impressive attempt to persuade those working on personal identity to give up mainstream positions and take on a narrative view instead. More recently, she has presented new arguments with a closely related aim. She attempts to convince us to give up the view of identity as a matter of psychological continuity, using Derek Parfit's story of the “Nineteenth Century Russian” as a central example in making the case against Parfit's own (...)
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  35. David S. Oderberg (2007). Real Essentialism. Routledge.score: 24.0
    Contemporary essentialism and real essentialism -- Against modalism -- Reductionism : the illusory search for inner constitution -- Why real essentialism? -- Some varieties of anti-essentialism -- Empiricist anti-essentialism -- Quinean animadversions -- Popper : avoiding what-is questions -- Wittgenstein : the shadow of grammar -- The reality and knowability of essence -- Why essences are real -- The problem of the universal accidental -- An empirical test for essence? -- Coming to know essence -- Paradigms, stereotypes, and classification (...)
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  36. Jitse M. van der Meer (2000). The Engagement of Religion and Biology: A Case Study in the Mediating Role of Metaphor in the Sociobiology of Lumsden & Wilson. [REVIEW] Biology and Philosophy 15 (5):669-698.score: 24.0
    I claim that explanations of human behaviour by Edward O. Wilsonand Charles Lumsden are constituted by a religiously functioningmetaphysics: emergent materialism. The constitutive effects areidentified using six criteria, beginning with a metaphorical re-description of dissimilarities between levels of organization interms of the lower level, and consist of conceptual andexplanatory reductions (CER). Wilson and Lumsden practice CER,even though CER is not required by emergent materialism. Theypreconceive this practice by a re-description which conflates thelevels of organization and explain failure of CER in (...)
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  37. René Jagnow, Geometry and Spatial Intuition: A Genetic Approach.score: 24.0
    In this thesis, I investigate the nature of geometric knowledge and its relationship to spatial intuition. My goal is to rehabilitate the Kantian view that Euclid's geometry is a mathematical practice, which is grounded in spatial intuition, yet, nevertheless, yields a type of a priori knowledge about the structure of visual space. I argue for this by showing that Euclid's geometry allows us to derive knowledge from idealized visual objects, i.e., idealized diagrams by means of non-formal logical inferences. By developing (...)
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  38. Eduard Marbach (2010). Is There a Metaphysics of Consciousness Without a Phenomenology of Consciousness? Some Thoughts Derived From Husserl's Philosophical Phenomenology. Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 85 (67):141-154.score: 24.0
    The paper first addresses Husserl's conception of philosophical phenomenology, metaphysics, and the relation between them, in order to explain why, on Husserl's view, there is no metaphysics of consciousness without a phenomenology of consciousness. In doing so, it recalls some of the methodological tenets of Husserl's phenomenology, pointing out that phenomenology is an eidetic or a priori science which has first of all to do with mere ideal possibilities of consciousness and its correlates; metaphysics of consciousness, on the other hand, (...)
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  39. Ivor Ludlam (2011). Thrasymachus in Plato's Politeia I. Maynooth Philosophical Papers (6):18-44.score: 24.0
    This is an earlier version of a chapter from my as yet unpublished book analysing Plato’s Politeia (= Republic) as a philosophical drama in which the participants turn out to be models of various types of psychic constitution, and nothing is said by them which may be considered to be an opinion of Plato himself (with all that that entails for Platonism). The debate in Book I between Socrates and Thrasymachus serves as a test case for the assumptions that (...)
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  40. Graham Harman (2011). The Road to Objects. Continent 3 (1):171-179.score: 24.0
    continent. 1.3 (2011): 171-179. Since 2007 there has been a great deal of interest in speculative realism, launched in the spring of that year at a well-attended workshop in London. It was always a loose arrangement of people who shared few explicit doctrines and no intellectual heroes except the horror writer H.P. Lovecraft, an improbable patron saint for a school of metaphysics. Lovecraft serves as a sort of mascot for the “speculative” part of speculative realism, since his grotesque semi-Euclidean monsters (...)
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  41. Helena de Preester (2011). Technology and the Body: The (Im)Possibilities of Re-Embodiment. [REVIEW] Foundations of Science 16 (2):119-137.score: 24.0
    This article argues for a more rigorous distinction between body extensions on the one hand and incorporation of non-bodily objects into the body on the other hand. Real re-embodiment would be a matter of taking things (most often technologies) into the body, i.e. of incorporation of non-bodily items into the body. This, however, is a difficult process often limited by a number of conditions of possibility that are absent in the case of ‘mere’ body extensions. Three categories are discussed: (...)
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  42. Theodore Sider (2002). Review of Lynne Rudder Baker, Persons and Bodies. [REVIEW] Journal of Philosophy 99 (1):45-48.score: 24.0
    Locke’s view that continuants are numerically distinct from their constituting hunks of matter is popular enough to be called the “standard account”.1 It was given its definitive contemporary statement by David Wiggins in Sameness and Substance2, and has been defended by many since. Baker’s interesting book contributes new arguments for this view, a new definition of ‘constitution’, and a sustained application to persons and human animals. Much of what she says develops this view in new and important ways. (...)
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  43. John Kilcullen, A Comparison of the Australian, British, and American Political Systems.score: 24.0
    Like the American system ours is federal: i.e., there are two levels of government, neither of which can change the powers of the other or make laws within certain fields assigned to the other. The British system is 'unitary': the British parliament can make laws on any matter, local government has whatever powers the national government delegates to it. Like the British, ours is a system of responsible government . The Government (the Prime Minister and cabinet) is 'responsible' to (...)
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  44. Helen A. Fielding (2011). Multiple Moving Perceptions of the Real: Arendt, Merleau-Ponty, and Truitt. Hypatia 26 (3):518-534.score: 24.0
    This paper explores the ethical insights provided by Anne Truitt's minimalist sculptures, as viewed through the phenomenological lenses of Hannah Arendt's investigations into the co-constitution of reality and Maurice Merleau-Ponty's investigations into perception. Artworks in their material presence can lay out new ways of relating and perceiving. Truitt's works accomplish this task by revealing the interactive motion of our embodied relations and how material objects can actually help to ground our reality and hence human potentiality. Merleau-Ponty shows how our (...)
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  45. Jairo da Silva (2012). Husserl on Geometry and Spatial Representation. Axiomathes 22 (1):5-30.score: 24.0
    Husserl left many unpublished drafts explaining (or trying to) his views on spatial representation and geometry, such as, particularly, those collected in the second part of Studien zur Arithmetik und Geometrie (Hua XXI), but no completely articulate work on the subject. In this paper, I put forward an interpretation of what those views might have been. Husserl, I claim, distinguished among different conceptions of space, the space of perception (constituted from sensorial data by intentionally motivated psychic functions), that of physical (...)
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  46. Robert Allen (2000). Identity and Becoming. Southern Journal of Philosophy 38 (4):527-548.score: 24.0
    A material object is constituted by a sum of parts all of which are essential to the sum but some of which seem inessential to the object itself. Such object/sum of parts pairs include my body/its torso and appendages and my desk/its top, drawers, and legs. In these instances, we are dealing with objects and their components. But, fundamentally, we may also speak, as Locke does, of an object and its constitutive matter—a “mass of particles”—or even of that aggregate (...)
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  47. Jacob T. Levy (2007). Federalism and the Old and New Liberalisms. Social Philosophy and Policy 24 (1):306-326.score: 24.0
    The transition from a relatively federal to a relatively centralized constitutional structure in the United States has often been identified with the shift from classical to welfare liberalism as a matter of public philosophy. This article argues against that distinction. The liberal argument for federalism is a contingent one, built on approximations, counterbalancing, and political power. A more federalist constitution is not automatically a freer one on classical liberal understandings of freedom. Neither is a more centralized constitution (...)
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  48. Purushottama Bilimoria (1995). Legal Rulings on Suicide in India and Implications for the Right to Die. Asian Philosophy 5 (2):159 – 180.score: 24.0
    Abstract In this paper I am concerned to address the question of voluntary or self?willed death from two distinct positions?a particular community's socio?religious practice (viz. Jaina sallekhan?) and as the matter stands in law (penal code, constitution, judicial wisdom, etc.) in India?in the light of the recent move by a bench of its apex court striking down the penal code section proscribing suicide. I also wish to draw out some implications of these deliberations for the beneficence of medical (...)
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  49. Guido Möllering (2006). Trust: Reason, Routine, Reflexivity. Elsevier.score: 24.0
    What makes trust such a powerful concept? Is it merely that in trust the whole range of social forces that we know play together? Or is it that trust involves a peculiar element beyond those we can account for? While trust is an attractive and evocative concept that has gained increasing popularity across the social sciences, it remains elusive, its many facets and applications obscuring a clear overall vision of its essence. In this book, Guido Möllering reviews a broad range (...)
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