Search results for 'Matter Constitution' (try it on Scholar)

1000+ found
Sort by:
  1. Torsten Wilholt (2008). When Realism Made a Difference: The Constitution of Matter and its Conceptual Enigmas in Late 19th Century Physics. Studies in History and Philosophy of Modern Physics 39 (1):1-16.score: 126.0
    The late 19th century debate among German-speaking physicists about theoretical entities is often regarded as foreshadowing the scientific realism debate. This paper brings out differences between them by concentrating on the part of the earlier debate that was concerned with the conceptual consistency of the competing conceptions of matter—mainly, but not exclusively, of atomism. Philosophical antinomies of atomism were taken up by Emil Du Bois-Reymond in an influential lecture in 1872. Such challenges to the consistency of atomism had repercussions (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. A. Matter (1999). Hunger in America: A Matter. Social Research 66 (1).score: 120.0
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. Mi Gyung Kim (1992). The Layers of Chemical Language, I: Constitution of Bodies V. Structure of Matter. History of Science 30:69-96.score: 120.0
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. William H. Kane (1935). Hylemorphism and the Recent Views of the Constitution of Matter. Proceedings of the American Catholic Philosophical Association 11:61-74.score: 120.0
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. Henry Laycock (1989). Matter and Objecthood Disentangled. Dialogue 28 (01):17-.score: 90.0
    The concept of matter is not, I urge, reducible to the concept of an object. This is to be distingusihed from the counterintuitive Aristotelian claim that matter depends for its existence on objects which it constitutes.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  6. Louis de Broglie (1939). Matter and Light. London, G. Allen & Unwin Ltd..score: 90.0
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  7. Michael C. Rea (ed.) (1997). Material Constitution. Rowman & Littlefield.score: 90.0
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  8. Egidijus Jarašiūnas (2012). Qualitative and Quantitative Parameters of the Execution of Foreign Policy in the Lithuanian Constitution. Jurisprudence 19 (3):923-953.score: 66.0
    The present article analyses the qualitative and quantitative parameters of the execution of foreign policy in the Constitution of the Republic of Lithuania. It should be noted that the matters of foreign policy were on the brink of constitutional regulation for a long time. The powers of institutions of the state in the field of foreign relations were established laconically by the Constitutions of first and second “waves” of establishment of constitutionalism. It was argued that the choices of decisions (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  9. Andreas Hüttemann (2004). What's Wrong with Microphysicalism? Routledge.score: 60.0
    Microphysicalism , the view that whole objects behave the way they do in virtue of the behavior of their constituent parts, is an influential contemporary view with a long philosophical and scientific heritage. In What's Wrong With Microphysicalism? Andreas Huttemann offers a fresh challenge to this view. Huttemann agrees with the microphysicalists that we can explain compound systems by explaining their parts, but claims that this does not entail that the parts determine the whole. At most, it shows that there (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  10. A. Huttemann (2004). What's Wrong with Microphysicalism. Routledge.score: 60.0
    Microphysicalism , the view that whole objects behave the way they do in virtue of the behavior of their constituent parts, is an influential contemporary view with a long philosophical and scientific heritage. In What's Wrong With Microphysicalism? Andreas Huttemann offers a fresh challenge to this view. Huttemann agrees with the microphysicalists that we can explain compound systems by explaining their parts, but claims that this does not entail that the parts determine the whole. At most, it shows that there (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  11. John Griffiths (1947). A New Concept of the Atomic System. [Ansonia, Conn..score: 60.0
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  12. O. A. Nikolʹskiĭ (2004). Osnovy Korpuskuli͡arno-Polevoĭ Teorii. Karpov.score: 60.0
    No categories
    Translate to English
    |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  13. W. F. G. Swann (1934). The Architecture of the Universe. New York, the Macmillan Company.score: 60.0
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  14. Andy Clark (2010). Coupling, Constitution and the Cognitive Kind. In Richard Menary (ed.), The Extended Mind. Mit Press.score: 54.0
    Adams and Aizawa, in a series of recent and forthcoming papers ((2001), (In Press), (This Volume)) seek to refute, or perhaps merely to terminally embarrass, the friends of the extended mind. One such paper begins with the following illustration: "Question: Why did the pencil think that 2+2=4? Clark's Answer: Because it was coupled to the mathematician" Adams and Aizawa (this volume) ms p.1 "That" the authors continue "about sums up what is wrong with Clark's extended mind hypothesis". The example of (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  15. Bryan Pickel (2010). There is No 'Is' of Constitution. Philosophical Studies 147 (2):193 - 211.score: 54.0
    I defend the view that ordinary objects like statues are identical to the pieces of matter from which they are made. I argue that ordinary speakers assert sentences such as ‘this statue is a molded piece of clay’. This suggests that speakers believe propositions which entail that ordinary objects such as statues are the pieces matter from which they are made, and therefore pluralism contradicts ordinary beliefs. The dominant response to this argument purports to find an ambiguity in (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  16. Andy Clark (2005). Coupling, Constitution and the Cognitive Kind: A Reply to Adams and Aizawa. In Richard Menary (ed.), The Extended Mind. Ashgate.score: 54.0
    Adams and Aizawa, in a series of recent and forthcoming papers ((2001), (In Press), (This Volume)) seek to refute, or perhaps merely to terminally embarrass, the friends of the extended mind. One such paper begins with the following illustration: "Question: Why did the pencil think that 2+2=4? Clark's Answer: Because it was coupled to the mathematician" Adams and Aizawa (this volume) ms p.1 "That" the authors continue "about sums up what is wrong with Clark's extended mind hypothesis". The example of (...)
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  17. William Lane Craig (2005). Does the Problem of Material Constitution Illuminate the Doctrine of the Trinity? Faith and Philosophy 22 (1):77-86.score: 54.0
    Michael Rea and Jeffery Brower have offered a provocative new model of the Trinity on the analogy of the Aristotelian solution to the problem of material constitution. Just as a fist and a hand can be distinct entities composed of a common matter and yet numerically the same object, so the persons of the Trinity can be distinct entities (persons) composed of a common "matter" (the divine essence) and yet numerically the same object (God). I express doubts (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  18. Christopher Zurn, V. Disagreement and the Constitution of Democracy.score: 54.0
    Perhaps we should change our focus from constitutionalized practices of democracy to democratized practices of constitutionalism. Dworkin and Perry both seek to respond to democratic objections to judicial review by relying on a theory of the legitimacy constraints of democracy itself. According to this view, on some matters, legitimate democracy requires getting the right moral answers. Thus democratic processes must be constitutionalized to ensure such right outcomes on fundamental moral matters. To the extent that judges are better positioned to engage (...)
    Translate to English
    |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  19. Tessa Jones, Amending and Defending Constitution.score: 54.0
    I begin by evaluating four theories: mereological essentialism, the occasional identity thesis, four-dimensionalism and the constitution view. I compare the solutions these theories offer to puzzles of material constitution with particular attention being paid to their treatment of Leibniz’s Law, the ontological status of objects and the distinction between objects and their matter. If a lump of clay constitutes a statue, the lump of clay and the statue are metaphysically distinct such that they are distinct kinds, but (...)
    Translate to English
    | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  20. Hagit Benbaji (2008). Material Objects, Constitution, and Mysterianism. Southern Journal of Philosophy 46 (1):1-26.score: 54.0
    It is sometimes claimed that ordinary objects, such as mountains and chairs, are not material in their own right, but only in virtue of the fact that they are constituted by matter. As Fine puts it, they are “onlyderivatively material” (2003, 211). In this paper I argue that invoking “constitution” to account for the materiality of things that are not material in their own right explains nothing and renders the admission that these objects are indeed material completely mysterious. (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  21. Robert A. Sedler, The Constitution, the Courts and the Common Law.score: 54.0
    This article maintains that it is the constitutional responsibility of the courts, here the courts of the State of Michigan, to engage in judicial policymaking in the process of formulating common law rules. The article is written in response to the views expressed by some Justices of the Michigan Supreme Court that separation of powers concerns should impose significant limits on the power of the courts to establish and develop the common law of Michigan. Specifically, the contention is that policymaking (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  22. Pavlos Eleftheriadis (2007). The Idea of a European Constitution. Oxford Journal of Legal Studies 27 (1):1-21.score: 54.0
    Any abstract account of a field of law must make generalizations that are both faithful to the legal materials and appropriate to the subject matter's aims. The uniqueness and fluidity of the European Union's institutions makes such generalizations very difficult. A common theoretical approach to EU law (one that is often relied upon by the Court of Justice, the Parliament and the Commission) is to borrow directly from the theory of domestic constitutional law. The most recent manifestation of this (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  23. Rosa Nidia Buenfil Burgos (2004). Negativity: A Disturbing Constitutive Matter in Education. Journal of Philosophy of Education 38 (3):429–440.score: 50.0
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  24. P. M. S. Hacker (1979). Substance: The Constitution of Reality. Midwest Studies in Philosophy 4 (1):239-261.score: 42.0
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  25. Paul Kalligas (2011). The Structure of Appearances: Plotinus on the Constitution of Sensible Objects. Philosophical Quarterly 61 (245):762-782.score: 42.0
    Plotinus describes sensible objects as conglomerations of qualities and matter. However, none of these ingredients seems capable of accounting for the structure underlying the formation of each sensible object so as to constitute an identifiable and discrete entity. This is the effect of the logos, the organizing formative principle inherent in each object, which determines how its qualitative constituents are brought together to form a coherent unity. How the logos operates differs in various kinds of entities, such as living (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  26. Susanna Goodin (1998). Why Knowledge of the Internal Constitution is Not the Same as Knowledge of the Real Essence and Why This Matters. Southwest Philosophy Review 14 (1):149-155.score: 40.0
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  27. David A. Reidy (2000). Richard Markovits, Matters of Principle: Legitimate Legal Argument and Constitutional Interpretation:Matters of Principle: Legitimate Legal Argument and Constitutional Interpretation. Ethics 110 (4):851-853.score: 40.0
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  28. Mark Tushnet (2010). Constitutional Design as If Civic Education Mattered. Journal of Social Philosophy 41 (2):210-213.score: 40.0
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  29. Ishmael D. Norman (2012). The Constitutional Mandate for Judge-Made-Law and Judicial Activism: A Case Study of the Matter of Elizabeth Vaah V. Lister Hospital and Fertility Centre. Open Ethics Journal 6 (1):1-7.score: 40.0
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  30. Francesco Burchi, Pasquale De Muro & Eszter Kollar (2014). Which Dimensions Should Matter for Capabilities? A Constitutional Approach. Ethics and Social Welfare 8 (3):233-247.score: 40.0
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  31. Matthew J. Donald (1998). Constitutions of Matter. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science-Part B 29 (2):277-280.score: 40.0
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  32. Jill Frank & S. Sara Monson (2009). Lived Excellence in Aristotle's Constitution of Athens: Why the Encomium of Theramenes Matters. In Stephen G. Salkever (ed.), The Cambridge Companion to Ancient Greek Political Thought. Cambridge University Press.score: 40.0
  33. Nathan Gibbs (2007). Getting Constitutional Theory Into Proportion: A Matter of Interpretation? Oxford Journal of Legal Studies 27 (1):175-191.score: 40.0
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  34. Martin H. Krieger & Steven French (1998). Constitutions of Matter: Mathematically Modelling the Most Everyday of Physical Phenomena. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 49 (2):355-358.score: 40.0
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  35. J. M. (1998). Constitutions of Matter. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part B 29 (2):277-279.score: 40.0
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  36. Ishmael D. Norman, Moses Sk Aikins, Fred N. Binka, Divine Ndonbi Banyubala & Ama K. Edwin (2012). The Constitutional Mandate for Judge-Made-Law and Judicial Activism: A Case Study of the Matter of Elizabeth Vaah V. Lister Hospital and Fertility Centre. Open Ethics Journal 6:1-7.score: 40.0
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  37. Reviewed by David A. Reidy (2000). Richard Markovits, Matters of Principle: Legitimate Legal Argument and Constitutional Interpretation. Ethics 110 (4).score: 40.0
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  38. Beau Breslin (2009). From Words to Worlds: Exploring Constitutional Functionality. Johns Hopkins University Press.score: 38.0
    In the 225 years since the United States Constitution was first drafted, no single book has addressed the key questions of what constitutions are designed to do, how they are structured, and why they matter. In From Words to Worlds, constitutional scholar Beau Breslin corrects this glaring oversight, singling out the essential functions that a modern, written constitution must incorporate in order to serve as a nation's fundamental law. Breslin lays out and explains the basic functions of (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  39. Kirsty Duncanson (2011). 'We the People of the United States…': The Matrix and the Realisation of Constitutional Sovereignty. [REVIEW] International Journal for the Semiotics of Law - Revue Internationale de Sémiotique Juridique 24 (4):385-404.score: 38.0
    In its enunciation of “We the people,” the Constitution of the United States of America becomes a constitution of the flesh as it simultaneously invokes a constitution, a nation and a people. Correspondingly, its amendments as a list of rights pertaining to sex and race discrimination, and freedoms of bodily movement and action, assert the Constitution’s authority through the evocation of “natural” human bodies. In this article, I explore the way in which a sovereignty of the (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  40. Maria Chiara Pievatolo (2013). Scandalum acceptum e scandalum datum: il non-intervenzionismo di Kant nel quinto articolo preliminare della Pace perpetua. Scienza and Politica. Per Una Storia Delle Dottrine 25 (48).score: 36.0
    Is it right to wage war to export democracy, or - as Kant would have said - to forcibly interfere in the constitution and in the government of another state with the goal of transforming it into a republic? The answer of Kant, contained in the fifth preliminary article of the Perpetual Peace, leans towards non-interventionism: a bad constitution can never justify a war, because it may be the root only of a scandalum acceptum. To understand the meaning (...)
    No categories
    Translate to English
    | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  41. Paddy Dolan (2010). Space, Time and the Constitution of Subjectivity: Comparing Elias and Foucault. Foucault Studies 8:8-27.score: 36.0
    The work of Foucault and Elias has been compared before in the social sciences and humanities, but here I argue that the main distinction between their approaches to the construction of subjectivity is the relative importance of space and time in their accounts. This is not just a matter of the “history of ideas,” as providing for the temporal dimension more fully in theories of subjectivity and the habitus allows for a greater understanding of how ways of being, acting (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  42. Judith W. Decew (1987). Defending the “Private” in Constitutional Privacy. Journal of Value Inquiry 21 (3):171-184.score: 34.0
    Suppose we agree to reject the view that privacy has narrow scope and consequently is irrelevant to the constitutional privacy cases. We then have (at least) these two options: (1) We might further emphasize and draw out similarities between tort and constitutional privacy claims in order to develop a notion of privacy fundamental to informational and Fourth Amendment privacy concerns as well as the constitutional cases. We can cite examples indicating this is a promising position. Consider consenting homosexuality conducted in (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  43. Carrie-Ann Biondi (2007). Aristotle on the Mixed Constitution and its Relevance for American Political Thought. Social Philosophy and Policy 24 (2):176-198.score: 30.0
    Contemporary political discourse is marked with the language of democracy, and Western countries in particular seek to promote democracy at home and abroad. However, there is a sublimated conflict in general political discourse between a desire to rely on alleged political experts and a desire to assert the supposed common sense of all men. Can the struggle between the democratic and aristocratic values embodied in this conflict be reconciled? The question is perennial, and raises issues that are central to constitutional (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  44. Henry Laycock (1975). Theories of Matter. Synthese 31 (3-4):411 - 442.score: 30.0
    "Matter" may be defined, according to the Oxford English Dictionary, as "The substance, or the substances collectively, out of which a physical object is made or of which it consists". And while the O.E.D. is not the ultimate authority on words, nor is it, I believe, far wrong in this particular case. The definition is, as I shall argue in this paper, in substantial harmony with a tradition of some antiquity, according to which material objects do not constitute a (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  45. Norwood Russell Hanson (1962). The Dematerialization of Matter. Philosophy of Science 29 (1):27-38.score: 30.0
    1. The philosophical version of the primary-secondary distinction concerns (a) the 'real' properties of matter, (b) the epistemology of sensation, and (c) a contrast challenged by Berkely as illusory. The scientific version of the primary-secondary distinction concerns (a') the physical properties of matter, (b') a contrast essential within the history of atomism, and (c') a contrast challenged by 20th century microphysics as de facto untenable. 2. The primary-secondary distinction within physics can be interpreted in two ways: a. it (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  46. Henry P. Stapp, Quantum Ontology and Mind Matter Synthesis.score: 30.0
    The Solvay conference of marked the birth of quantum the ory This theory constitutes a radical break with prior tradition in physics because it avers if taken seriously that nature is built not out of matter but out of knowings However the founders of the theory stipulated cautiously that the theory was not to be taken seriously in this sense as a description of nature herself but was to be construed as merely a way of computing expectations about future (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  47. Skott Brill (2007). Does It Matter That Nothing We Do Will Matter in a Million Years? Dialogue 46 (1):3-25.score: 30.0
    People have inferred that our lives are absurd from the supposed fact that nothing we do will matter in a million years. In this article, I critically discuss this argument for absurdity. After explaining how two refutations in the literature fail to undermine the best version of the argument, I produce several considerations that together do take much of the force out of the argument. I conclude by suggesting that these considerations not only refute this argument for absurdity, but (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  48. Cecile Fabre (2004). Good Samaritanism : A Matter of Justice. In Jonathan Seglow (ed.), The Ethics of Altruism. F. Cass Publishers. 128-144.score: 30.0
    Liberal theorists of justice hardly ever study duties of Good Samaritanism. This is not to say that they regard a failure to be a Good Samaritan as morally acceptable: indeed, most of them think that it is morally wrong. But they tend not to think that it is morally wrong on the grounds that it constitutes a violation of a duty of justice. Rather, they condemn it as a failure to perform a duty of charity, or as a failure to (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  49. Maksymilian Del Mar (2012). What Does History Matter to Legal Epistemology? Journal of the Philosophy of History 5 (3):383-405.score: 30.0
    Abstract This paper argues that not only does history matter to legal epistemology, but also that understanding legal epistemology can yield a certain understanding of the past. The paper focuses on the common law practice of precedent and argues that there is no set of rules, principles, reasons or material facts that constitute the fixed or foundational content of past decisions (a `timeless what' that determines its own relevance), but rather that what is taken by a judge resolving a (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
1 — 50 / 1000