Search results for 'Matter Properties' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  54
    L. De la Peña & A. M. Cetto (1994). The Wave Properties of Matter and the Zeropoint Radiation Field. Foundations of Physics 24 (5):753-781.
    The origin of the wave properties of matter is discussed from the point of view of stochastic electrodynamics. A nonrelativistic model of a charged particle with an effective structure embedded in the random zeropoint radiation field reveals that the field induces a high-frequency vibration on the particle; internal consistency of the theory fixes the frequency of this jittering at mc2/ħ. The particle is therefore assumed to interact intensely with stationary zeropoint waves of this frequency as seen from its (...)
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  2.  6
    Giovanni Boato & Natalia Moro (1994). Bancalari's Role in Faraday's Discovery of Diamagnetism and the Successive Progress in the Understanding of Magnetic Properties of Matter. Annals of Science 51 (4):391-412.
    The events and thoughts which brought Michael Faraday to the discovery of diamagnetism in the year 1845 are reviewed and commented. The contribution of Bancalari, namely the discovery of diamagnetism in flame and gases made at the University of Genoa in 1847, had a strong impact on the continuation of Faraday's brilliant researches on magnetism in matter. Diamagnetism was carefully studied by him and other authors, while paramagnetism was revealed in solid, liquid, and gaseous substances. A systematic study of (...)
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  3. Heather Logue (2013). Visual Experience of Natural Kind Properties: Is There Any Fact of the Matter? Philosophical Studies 162 (1):1-12.
  4.  88
    G. K. Vemulapalli (2010). Thermodynamics and Chemistry: How Does a Theory Formulated Without Reference to Matter Explain the Properties of Matter? Philosophy of Science 77 (5):911-920.
  5.  89
    Iris Fry (1996). On the Biological Significance of the Properties of Matter: L. J. Henderson's Theory of the Fitness of the Environment. [REVIEW] Journal of the History of Biology 29 (2):155 - 196.
  6.  4
    Timo Kaitaro (2008). Can Matter Mark the Hours? Eighteenth-Century Vitalist Materialism and Functional Properties. Science in Context 21 (4):581.
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  7. Robert DiSalle (1990). The “Essential Properties” of Matter, Space, and Time. In Phillip Bricker & R. I. G. Hughes (eds.), Philosophical Perspectives on Newtonian Science. MIT Press
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  8.  1
    Leopold E. Klopfer, Audrey B. Champagne & Seth D. Chaiklin (1992). The Ubiquitous Quantities: Explorations That Inform the Design of Instruction on the Physical Properties of Matter. Science Education 76 (6):597-614.
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  9. Richard D. Baldwin (1964). A Model Simulating Some Properties of Living Matter: A Contribution in Abstract Biology. Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 7 (2):219-226.
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  10. Andrew A. Cochran (1965). Life and the Wave Properties of Matter. Dialectica 19 (3‐4):290-312.
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  11. Iris Fry (1996). On the Biological Significance of the Properties of Matter: L.J. Henderson's Theory of the Fitness of the Environment. Journal of the History of Biology 29 (2):155-196.
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  12. Vikas Kumar, Carl Sondergeld & Chandra S. Rai (2015). Effect of Mineralogy and Organic Matter on Mechanical Properties of Shale. Interpretation 3 (3):SV9-SV15.
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  13. E. S. Russell (1916). HENDERSON, L. J. - The fitness of the environment; an enquiry into the biological significance of the properties of matter. [REVIEW] Scientia 10 (20):402.
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  14.  34
    Francoise Monnoyeur (2015). What is the Value of Geometric Models to Understand Matter? Epekeina 6 (2):1-13.
    This article analyzes the value of geometric models to understand matter with the examples of the Platonic model for the primary four elements (fire, air, water, and earth) and the models of carbon atomic structures in the new science of crystallography. How the geometry of these models is built in order to discover the properties of matter is explained: movement and stability for the primary elements, and hardness, softness and elasticity for the carbon atoms. These geometric models (...)
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  15.  27
    A. Huttemann (2004). What's Wrong with Microphysicalism. Routledge.
    Microphysicalism , the view that whole objects behave the way they do in virtue of the behavior of their constituent parts, is an influential contemporary view with a long philosophical and scientific heritage. In What's Wrong With Microphysicalism? Andreas Huttemann offers a fresh challenge to this view. Huttemann agrees with the microphysicalists that we can explain compound systems by explaining their parts, but claims that this does not entail that the parts determine the whole. At most, it shows that there (...)
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  16.  37
    Andreas Bartels (2013). Why Metrical Properties Are Not Powers. Synthese 190 (12):2001-2013.
    What has the dispositional analysis of properties and laws (e.g. Molnar, Powers, Oxford University Press, Oxford, 2003; Mumford, Laws in nature, Routledge London, 2004; Bird, Nature’s metaphysics, Clarendon Press, Oxford, 2007) to offer to the scientific understanding of physical properties?—The article provides an answer to this question for the case of spacetime points and their metrical properties in General Relativity. The analysis shows that metrical properties are not ‘powers’, i.e. they cannot be understood as producing the (...)
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  17. Ghislain Guigon (2014). Overall Similarity, Natural Properties, and Paraphrases. Philosophical Studies 167 (2):387-399.
    I call anti-resemblism the thesis that independently of any contextual specification there is no determinate fact of the matter about the comparative overall similarity of things. Anti-resemblism plays crucial roles in the philosophy of David Lewis. For instance, Lewis has argued that his counterpart theory is anti-essentialist on the grounds that counterpart relations are relations of comparative overall similarity and that anti-resemblism is true. After Lewis committed himself to a form of realism about natural properties he maintained that (...)
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  18.  19
    Liam P. Dempsey (2009). Thinking-Matter Then and Now: The Evolution of Mind-Body Dualism. History of Philosophy Quarterly 26 (1):43 - 61.
    Since the seventeenth century, mind-body dualism has undergone an evolution, both in its metaphysics and its supporting arguments. In particular, debates in seventeenth- and eighteenth-century England prepared the way for the fall of substance dualism—the view that the human mind is an immaterial substance capable of independent existence—and the rise of a much less radical property dualism. The evolution from the faltering plausibility of substance dualism to the growing appeal of property dualism depended on at least two factors. On the (...)
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  19.  41
    Andreas Hüttemann (2004). What's Wrong with Microphysicalism? Routledge.
    Microphysicalism , the view that whole objects behave the way they do in virtue of the behavior of their constituent parts, is an influential contemporary view with a long philosophical and scientific heritage. In What's Wrong With Microphysicalism? Andreas Huttemann offers a fresh challenge to this view. Huttemann agrees with the microphysicalists that we can explain compound systems by explaining their parts, but claims that this does not entail that the parts determine the whole. At most, it shows that there (...)
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  20.  48
    Boris Hennig (2008). Matter in Z3. Foundations of Science 13 (3-4):199-215.
    In this paper, I will discuss a certain conception of matter that Aristotle introduces in Metaphysics Z3. It is often assumed that Aristotle came to distinguish between matter and form only in his physical writings, and that this lead to a conflict with the doctrine of primary substances in the Categories that he tries to resolve in Z3. I will argue that there is no such conflict. In Z3, Aristotle seems to suggest that matter is what is (...)
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  21.  44
    Christopher Byrne (1995). Prime Matter and Actuality. Journal of the History of Philosophy 33 (2):197-224.
    In the context of Aristotle's metaphysics and natural philosophy, 'prime matter' refers to that material cause which is both the proximate material cause of the four sublunary elements and the ultimate material cause of all perishable substances. On the traditional view, prime matter is pure potentiality, without any determinate nature of its own. Against this view, I argue that prime matter must be physical, extended, and movable matter if it is to fulfil its role as the (...)
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  22.  12
    Timothy H. McNicholl (2001). On the Convergence of Query-Bounded Computations and Logical Closure Properties of C.E. Sets. Journal of Symbolic Logic 66 (4):1543-1560.
    Call a set A n-correctable if every set Turing reducible to A via a Turing machine that on any input makes at most n queries is Turing reducible to A via a Turing machine that on any input makes at most n-queries and on any input halts no matter what answers are given to its queries. We show that if a c.e. set A is n-correctable for some n ≥ 2, then it is n-correctable for all n. We show (...)
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  23.  25
    M. Esfeld (2014). Quantum Humeanism, Or: Physicalism Without Properties. Philosophical Quarterly 64 (256):453-470.
    In recent literature, it has become clear that quantum physics does not refute Humeanism: Lewis’s thesis of Humean supervenience can be literally true even in the light of quantum entanglement. This point has so far been made with respect to Bohm’s quantum theory. Against this background, this paper seeks to achieve the following four results: to generalize the option of quantum Humeanism from Bohmian mechanics to primitive ontology theories in general; to show that this option applies also to classical mechanics; (...)
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  24.  12
    Michael Esfeld (2014). Physics and Intrinsic Properties. In Robert M. Francescotti (ed.), Companion to Intrinsic Properties. De Gruyter 253-270.
    The paper sketches out an ontology of physics in terms of matter being primitive stuff distributed in space and all the properties physics is committed to being dispositions that fix the temporal development of the distribution of matter in space. Whereas such properties can be conceived as intrinsic properties of particles in classical mechanics, in quantum physics, there is a holistic property or structure that relates all matter and that fixes its temporal development.
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  25. Charles T. Wolfe (2014). Sensibility as Vital Force or as Property of Matter in Mid-Eighteenth-Century Debates. In Henry Martyn Lloyd (ed.), The Discourse of Sensibility: The Knowing Body in the Enlightenment. Springer 147-170.
    Sensibility, in any of its myriad realms – moral, physical, aesthetic, medical and so on – seems to be a paramount case of a higher-level, intentional property, not a basic property. Diderot famously made the bold and attributive move of postulating that matter itself senses, or that sensibility (perhaps better translated ‘sensitivity’ here) is a general or universal property of matter, even if he at times took a step back from this claim and called it a “supposition.” Crucially, (...)
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  26.  71
    Berit Brogaard & Bartek Chomanski (2015). Cognitive Penetrability and High‐Level Properties in Perception: Unrelated Phenomena? Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 96 (4):469-486.
    There has been a recent surge in interest in two questions concerning the nature of perceptual experience; viz. the question of whether perceptual experience is sometimes cognitively penetrated and that of whether high-level properties are presented in perceptual experience. Only rarely have thinkers been concerned with the question of whether the two phenomena are interestingly related. Here we argue that the two phenomena are not related in any interesting way. We argue further that this lack of an interesting connection (...)
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  27. David J. Bohm (1986). A New Theory of the Relationship of Mind and Matter. Journal of the American Society for Psychical Research 80 (2 & 3):113-35.
    The relationship of mind and matter is approached in a new way in this article. This approach is based on the causal interpretation of the quantum theory, in which an electron, for example, is regarded as an inseparable union of a particle and afield. This field has, however, some new properties that can be seen to be the main sources of the differences between the quantum theory and the classical (Newtonian) theory. These new properties suggest that the (...)
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  28.  25
    Travis Dumsday (2015). Atoms Vs. Extended Simples: Towards a Dispositionalist Reconciliation. Philosophia 43 (4):1023-1033.
    There are four main theories concerning the ultimate constitution of matter: atomism version 1, atomism version 2, the theory of gunk, and the theory of extended simples. These four theories are usually seen as diametrically opposed. Here I take a stab at ecumenism, and argue that atomism version 1 and the theory of extended simples can be reconciled and rendered compatible by reference to the reality of dispositions.
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  29.  22
    Paul Needham (2008). Is Water a Mixure Bridging the Distinction Between Physical and Chemical Properties. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 39 (1):66-77.
    Two inter-linked theses are defended in this paper. One is the Duhemian theme that a rigid distinction between physical and chemical properties cannot be upheld. Duhem maintained this view not because the latter are reducible to the former, but because if physics is to remain consistent with chemistry it must prove possible to expand it to accommodate new features, and a rigid distinction would be a barrier to this process. The second theme is that naturally occurring isotopic variants of (...)
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  30.  12
    A. A. Long (2016). What is the Matter with Matter, According to Plotinus? Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 78:37-54.
    Modern science is not linguistically original in hypothesizing the existence of dark matter. For Plotinus, the matter that underlies all perceptible objects, is essentially obscure and describable only in the negative terms of what it lacks by way of inherent properties. In formulating this theory of absolute matter, Plotinus took himself to be interpreting both Plato and Aristotle, with the result that his own position emerges as a highly original and equivocal synthesis of this tradition. Plotinus (...)
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  31.  4
    Gerald Vision (2011). Re-Emergence: Locating Conscious Properties in a Material World. The MIT Press.
    In " Re-Emergence" he explores the question of conscious properties arising from brute, unthinking matter, making the case that there is no equally plausible non-emergent alternative.
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  32.  32
    Michael Esfeld, Dirk-André Deckert & Andrea Oldofredi, What is Matter? The Fundamental Ontology of Atomism and Structural Realism.
    We set out a fundamental ontology of atomism in terms of matter points. While being most parsimonious, this ontology is able to match both classical and quantum mechanics, and it remains a viable option for any future theory of cosmology that goes beyond current quantum physics. The matter points are structurally individuated: all there is to them are the spatial relations in which they stand; neither a commitment to intrinsic properties nor to an absolute space is required. (...)
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  33.  87
    Leopold Halpern (1994). Matter and Geometry in a Unified Theory. Foundations of Physics 24 (12):1697-1703.
    The prediction of general relativity on the gravitational collapse of matter ending in a point is viewed as an absurdity of the kind to be expected in any consistent physical theory due to ultimate conflicts of the axioms of geometry with the properties of physical objects. The necessity to introduce a probability interpretation for the solution of partial differential equations in space time for quantum theory points to similar roots. It is pointed out that quantum theory in the (...)
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  34.  2
    L. Hengwei & D. Da (2016). Russellian Monism: The Heritage of Russell’s Construction of Matter From Experience – Review of Consciousness in the Physical World: Perspectives on Russellian Monism. Constructivist Foundations 12 (1):126-129.
    Upshot: The central issue of Consciousness in the Physical World is Russellian monism, which claims that consciousness could be ontologically reduced to intrinsic properties of physical objects. In contemporary discussions, Russellian monism is more broadly defined than Russell’s original version of neutral monism, and it even becomes a family of views. In this review, based on two major distinctions between Russellian monism and Russell’s neutral monism, we point out that these current re-interpretations not only extend Russell’s theory; some may (...)
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  35.  43
    Paul R. Thagard (2002). How Molecules Matter to Mental Computation. Philosophy of Science 69 (3):497-518.
    Almost all computational models of the mind and brain ignore details about neurotransmitters, hormones, and other molecules. The neglect of neurochemistry in cognitive science would be appropriate if the computational properties of brains relevant to explaining mental functioning were in fact electrical rather than chemical. But there is considerable evidence that chemical complexity really does matter to brain computation, including the role of proteins in intracellular computation, the operations of synapses and neurotransmitters, and the effects of neuromodulators such (...)
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  36.  67
    Christian Cormier-Delanoue (1996). Strangeness of Matter Waves. Foundations of Physics 26 (1):95-103.
    The concept of waves associated with any material particle has been a considerable boost to theoretical physics, and it appears to be in accordance with many experimental results. Some relativistic properties of these assumed waves are studied in comparison to other physical waves. It turns out that matter waves may nor be considered as objectively real, and that any physics resting on such a concept can only be subjective.
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  37.  88
    Eric Schliesser, Without God: Gravity as a Relational Property of Matter in Newton.
    In this paper I interpret Newton’s speculative treatment of gravity as a relational, accidental property of matter that arises through what Newton calls “the shared action” of two bodies of matter. In doing so, I expand and extend on a hint by Howard Stein. However, in developing the details of my interpretation I end up disagreeing with Stein’s claim that for Newton a single body can generate a gravity/force field. I argue that when Newton drafted the first edition (...)
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  38.  72
    David Bohm (1990). A New Theory of the Relationship of Mind and Matter. Philosophical Psychology 3 (2 & 3):271 – 286.
    The relationship of mind and matter is approached in a new way in this article. This approach is based on the causal interpretation of the quantum theory, in which an electron, for example, is regarded as an inseparable union of a particle and afield. This field has, however, some new properties that can be seen to be the main sources of the differences between the quantum theory and the classical (Newtonian) theory. These new properties suggest that the (...)
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  39.  47
    Zvi Biener (2004). Galileo's First New Science: The Science of Matter. Perspectives on Science 12 (3):262-287.
    : Although Galileo's struggle to mathematize the study of nature is well known and oft discussed, less discussed is the form this struggle takes in relation to Galileo's first new science, the science of the second day of the Discorsi. This essay argues that Galileo's first science ought to be understood as the science of matter—not, as it is usually understood, the science of the strength of materials. This understanding sheds light on the convoluted structure of the Discorsi's first (...)
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  40.  5
    Sophie Audidière (2016). Why Do Helvétius's Writings Matter? Rousseau’s Notes Sur De L’Esprit. British Journal for the History of Philosophy 24 (5):983-1001.
    ABSTRACTDe l’esprit was read and commented on by Rousseau, Diderot, and Voltaire, in 1758. So was De l’homme when it appeared posthumously in 1773. We will go into this series of books, marginalia, and refutations, to address the question: what exactly was widely discussed between the three authors during the 1750s? Is it ‘materialism’? Our first point is to interpret the potential distortions, re-workings or re-appropriations in Rousseau’s marginalia, known as Notes sur De l’esprit, especially here about the so-called theory (...)
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  41.  50
    Henry P. Stapp, Quantum Ontology and Mind Matter Synthesis.
    The Solvay conference of marked the birth of quantum the ory This theory constitutes a radical break with prior tradition in physics because it avers if taken seriously that nature is built not out of matter but out of knowings However the founders of the theory stipulated cautiously that the theory was not to be taken seriously in this sense as a description of nature herself but was to be construed as merely a way of computing expectations about future (...)
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  42.  27
    Joachim Schummer, Epistemology of Material Properties.
    This paper presents an epistemological approach to the investigation of material properties that is opposed both to phenomenalistic epistemology and recent linguistical and ontological accounts of matter/mass terms. Emphasis is laid on the inherent context dependence of material properties. It is shown that, if this is taken seriously, some deep epistemological problems arise, like unavoidable uncertainty, incompleteness, inductivity, nonderivableness. It is further argued that some widely held epistemological accounts, namely that of essentialism, constructivism, and pragmatism, all reveal (...)
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  43.  38
    Joachim Keppler (2012). A Conceptual Framework for Consciousness Based on a Deep Understanding of Matter. Philosophy Study 2 (10):689-703.
    One of the main challenges in consciousness research is widely known as the hard problem of consciousness. In order to tackle this problem, I utilize an approach from theoretical physics, called stochastic electrodynamics (SED), which goes one step beyond quantum theory and sheds new light on the reality behind matter. According to this approach, matter is a resonant oscillator that is orchestrated by an all-pervasive stochastic radiation field, called zero-point field (ZPF). The properties of matter are (...)
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  44.  74
    Kirk A. Ludwig (1996). Shape Properties and Perception. In Enrique Villanueva (ed.), Philosophical Issues. Atascadero: Ridgeview 325-350.
    We can perceive shapes visually and tactilely, and the information we gain about shapes through both sensory modalities is integrated smoothly into and functions in the same way in our behavior independently of whether we gain it by sight or touch. There seems to be no reason in principle we couldn't perceive shapes through other sensory modalities as well, although as a matter of fact we do not. While we can identify shapes through other sensory modalities—e.g., I may know (...)
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  45.  60
    Glenn Tiller (2006). The Unknowable: The Pragmatist Critique of Matter. Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 42 (2):206-228.
    : Santayana's materialism is often the target of attack by critics past and present that are sympathetic to pragmatism. A common theme found in the objections of Santayana's critics is that matter is "unknowable". After briefly outlining Santayana's materialism and discussing his relationship to the pragmatist movement, four formulations of the "unknowable" objection are presented: (1) Matter is unknowable because it is not given in experience, (2) Matter is unknowable because its true nature cannot be revealed in (...)
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  46.  26
    Christopher Byrne (2015). Compositional & Functional Matter: Aristotle on the Material Cause of Biological Organisms. Apeiron 48 (4):387-406.
    Aristotle uses two kinds of material cause in his analysis of biological organisms: compositional matter, which persists through their birth and death;and functional matter, which consists of the organs and functional parts out of which biological organisms are made while they are alive. These two kinds of material cause, it has been argued, have quite different explanatory roles: functional matter is required by biological organisms to perform their essential functions,but compositional matter contributes nothing necessary to them (...)
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  47.  49
    Robert Pasnau (2010). Form and Matter. In Cambridge History of Medieval Philosophy. Cambridge University Press
    The first unquestionably big idea in the history of philosophy was the idea of form. The idea of course belonged to Plato, and was then domesticated at the hands of Aristotle, who paired form with matter as the two chief principles of his metaphysics and natural philosophy. In the medieval period, it was Aristotle’s conception of form and matter that generally dominated. This was true for both the Islamic and the Christian tradition, once the entire Aristotelian corpus became (...)
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  48.  34
    Susan Sterrett, Abstracting Matter.
    . Some disagreements have arisen in the last few years regarding the role played by material properties when modeling, simulating and experimenting on physical systems (Morrison 2008, Parker (forthcoming), Winsberg (forthcoming), Guala 2002, 2005; Morgan 2005). The question has proven more involved than it first appears. A number of significant and correct points have already been made, but some confusions remain. In this paper I attempt to sort them out. After pointing out the importance of some distinctions that need (...)
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  49.  35
    Norwood Russell Hanson (1962). The Dematerialization of Matter. Philosophy of Science 29 (1):27-38.
    1. The philosophical version of the primary-secondary distinction concerns (a) the 'real' properties of matter, (b) the epistemology of sensation, and (c) a contrast challenged by Berkely as illusory. The scientific version of the primary-secondary distinction concerns (a') the physical properties of matter, (b') a contrast essential within the history of atomism, and (c') a contrast challenged by 20th century microphysics as de facto untenable. 2. The primary-secondary distinction within physics can be interpreted in two ways: (...)
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  50.  14
    Emanuela Ceva & Federico Zuolo, A Matter of Respect. On the Relation Between the Majority and Minorities in a Democracy.
    The relations between the majority and minorities in a democracy have been standardly viewed as the main subject matter of toleration: the majority should refrain from using its dominant position to interfere with some minorities’ practices or beliefs despite its dislike or disapproval of such practices or beliefs. Can the idea of toleration provide us with the necessary resources to understand and respond to the problems arising out of majority/minorities relations in a democracy? We reply in the negative and (...)
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