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Profile: Matthew Altman (Central Washington University)
  1. Matthew C. Altman (2012). Kant and Applied Ethics: The Uses and Limits of Kant's Practical Philosophy. Wiley-Blackwell.
    Animal suffering and moral character -- Kant's strategic importance for environmental ethics -- Moral and legal arguments for universal health care -- The scope of patient autonomy -- Subjecting ourselves to capital punishment -- Same-sex marriage as a means to mutual respect -- Consent, mail-order brides, and the marriage contract -- Individual maxims and social justice -- The decomposition of the corporate body -- On becoming a person -- Conclusion: emerging from Kant's long shadow.
     
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  2. Matthew C. Altman (2012). On the Uses and Disadvantages of the Ticking Bomb Case for Life. International Journal of Applied Philosophy 26 (1):19-28.
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  3. Cynthia D. Coe & Matthew C. Altman (2012). Mandatory Ultrasound Laws and the Coercive Use of Informed Consent. Techné: Research in Philosophy and Technology 16 (1):16-30.
    Requiring that a woman who is seeking an abortion be given the opportunity to view an ultrasound of her fetus has spread from anti-abortion “pregnancy resource centers” to state laws. Proponents of these laws claim that having access to the ultrasound image is necessary for a woman to make a medically informed decision. In this paper, we argue that ultrasound examinations frame fetuses visually and linguistically as persons and interpellate pregnant women as mothers, with all of the cultural meaning invested (...)
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  4. Matthew C. Altman (2011). German Idealism and the Concept of Punishment. British Journal for the History of Philosophy 18 (5):953-956.
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  5. Matthew C. Altman (2011). Hegel and the Modern Arts (Review). Journal of the History of Philosophy 49 (3):381-382.
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  6. Matthew C. Altman (2011). Matters of Spirit: J. G. Fichte and the Technological Imagination (Review). Journal of the History of Philosophy 49 (2):259-261.
  7. Matthew C. Altman (2010). Ethics Beyond the Academy. Teaching Philosophy 33 (2):149-171.
    In addition to preparing students for graduate school or emphasizing transferable skills that are useful in any career, philosophy departments ought to give majors the education and work experience that will train them to become ethics officers outside of academia. This is a growing field that allows students to engage non-philosophers in setting corporate policies and addressing morally significant social issues. Using a course in medical ethics as an example, I show how incorporating service-learning into philosophy classes benefits students both (...)
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  8. Matthew C. Altman (2010). Kant on Sex and Marriage: The Implications for the Same-Sex Marriage Debate. Kant-Studien 101 (3):309-330.
    When examined critically, Kant's views on sex and marriage give us the tools to defend same-sex marriage on moral grounds. The sexual objectification of one's partner can only be overcome when two people take responsibility for one another's overall well-being, and this commitment is enforced through legal coercion. Kant's views on the unnaturalness of homosexuality do not stand up to scrutiny, and he cannot (as he often tries to) restrict the purpose of sex to procreation. Kant himself rules out marriage (...)
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  9. Matthew C. Altman (2010). Review of Johann Gottlieb Fichte, Allen Wood (Ed.), Attempt at a Critique of All Revelation. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2010 (5).
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  10. Matthew C. Altman (2008). The Significance of the Other in Moral Education: Fichte on the Birth of Subjectivity. History of Philosophy Quarterly 25 (2):175 - 186.
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  11. Matthew C. Altman & Cynthia D. Coe (2008). The Self as Creature and Creator. Idealistic Studies 37 (3):179-202.
    The conception of subjectivity that dominates the Western philosophical tradition, particularly during the Enlightenment, sets up a simple dichotomy: either the subject is ultimately autonomous or it is merely a causally determined thing. Fichte and Freud challenge this model by formulating theories of subjectivity that transcend this opposition. Fichte conceives of the subject as based in absolute activity, but that activity is qualified by a check for which it is not ultimately responsible. Freud explains the behavior of the self in (...)
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  12. Matthew C. Altman (2007). The Decomposition of the Corporate Body: What Kant Cannot Contribute to Business Ethics. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 74 (3):253 - 266.
    Kant is gaining popularity in business ethics because the categorical imperative rules out actions such as deceptive advertising and exploitative working conditions, both of which treat people merely as means to an end. However, those who apply Kant in this way often hold businesses themselves morally accountable, and this conception of collective responsibility contradicts the kind of moral agency that underlies Kant's ethics. A business has neither inclinations nor the capacity to reason, so it lacks the conditions necessary for constraint (...)
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  13. Matthew C. Altman & Cynthia D. Coe (2007). The Self as Creature and Creator: Fichte and Freud Against the Enlightenment. Idealistic Studies 37 (3):179-202.
    The conception of subjectivity that dominates the Western philosophical tradition, particularly during the Enlightenment, sets up a simple dichotomy: either the subject is ultimately autonomous or it is merely a causally determined thing. Fichte and Freud challenge this model by formulating theories of subjectivity thattranscend this opposition. Fichte conceives of the subject as based in absolute activity, but that activity is qualified by a check for which it is not ultimately responsible. Freud explains the behavior of the self in terms (...)
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  14. Matthew C. Altman (2005). Review of J.G. Fichte, Walter E. Wright (Ed.), The Science of Knowing: J. G. Fichte's 1804 Lectures on the Wissenschaftslehre. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2005 (11).
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  15. Matthew C. Altman (2005). Subjecting Ourselves to Capital Punishment: A Rejoinder to Kantian Retributivism. Public Affairs Quarterly 19 (4):247-264.
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  16. Cynthia D. Coe & Matthew C. Altman (2005). The Paradoxes of Convalescent History. New Nietzsche Studies 6 (3/4/1/2):116-128.
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  17. Matthew C. Altman (2004). What's the Use of Philosophy? Democratic Citizenship and the Direction of Higher Education. Educational Theory 54 (2):143-155.
  18. Matthew C. Altman & Cynthia D. Coe (2004). Willful History. International Studies in Philosophy 36 (3):5-13.
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  19. Matthew C. Altman (2001). Idealism is the Only Possible Philosophy. Idealistic Studies 31 (1):1-30.
    Fichte develops his idealism through a higher-level critique: only through the Fichtean fact of reason can one justify a systematic transcendental idealism, thereby making possible the self-sufficiency of theoretical reason. By examining the metaphilosophical implications of our immediate consciousness of the moral law, Fichte is able to assert the necessary metaphilosophical primacy of practical reason for any possible wissenschaftlich philosophy as well as the philosophical unity of theory and practice within such a system.
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  20. Matthew C. Altman (1998). Santayana's Troubled Distinction. Overheard in Seville 16 (16):25-34.
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