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Profile: Matthew Eshleman (University of North Carolina at Wilmington)
  1.  73
    Matthew C. Eshleman (2008). The Misplaced Chapter on Bad Faith, or Reading Being and Nothingness in Reverse. Sartre Studies International 14 (2):1-22.
    This essay argues that an adequate account of bad faith cannot be given without taking the second half of Being and Nothingness into consideration. There are two separate but related reasons for this. First, the objectifying gaze of Others provides a necessary condition for the possibility of bad faith. Sartre, however, does not formally introduce analysis of Others until Parts III and IV. Second, upon the introduction of Others, Sartre revises his view of absolute freedom. Sartre's considered view of freedom (...)
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  2.  5
    Matthew C. Eshleman (2009). 4 Beauvoir and Sartre on Freedom, Intersubjectivity, and Normative Justification. In Christine Daigle & Jacob Golomb (eds.), Beauvoir and Sartre: The Riddle of Influence. Indiana University Press 65--89.
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  3.  46
    Matthew C. Eshleman (2011). An Atypical Response to Living Without God. Sartre Studies International 16 (2):94-106.
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  4.  55
    Matthew C. Eshleman (2008). Bad Faith is Necessarily Social. Sartre Studies International 14 (2):40-47.
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  5.  17
    Matthew C. Eshleman (2007). The Cartesian Unconscious. History of Philosophy Quarterly 24 (3):297 - 315.
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  6.  5
    Matthew C. Eshleman (20013). Jean-Paul Sartre and Phenomenological Ontology. In Lester Embree & Thomas Nenon (eds.), Husserl’s Ideen. Springer 327--349.
  7. Matthew C. Eshleman (2010). What is It Like to Be Free? In Jonathan Webber (ed.), Reading Sartre: On Phenomenology and Existentialism. Routledge
     
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