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Profile: Matt Jordan (Auburn Montgomery)
  1. Matthew Carey Jordan (2013). Divine Commands or Divine Attitudes? Faith and Philosophy 30 (2):159-70.
    In this essay, I present three arguments for the claim that theists should reject divine command theory (DCT) in favor of divine attitude theory (DAT). First, DCT (but not DAT) implies that some cognitively normal human persons are exempt from the dictates of morality. Second, it is incumbent upon us to cultivate the skill of moral judgment, a skill that fits nicely with the claims of DAT but which is superfluous if DCT is true. Third, an attractive and widely shared (...)
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  2. Matthew Carey Jordan (2013). Liberal and Conservative Views of Marriage. Think 12 (34):33-56.
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  3. Matthew Carey Jordan (2012). Divine Attitudes, Divine Commands, and the Modal Status of Moral Truths. Religious Studies 48 (1):45-60.
    This essay presents a theistic account of deontic properties that can lay claim to many of the advantages of divine command theory but which avoids its flaws. The account, divine attitude theory, asserts that moral properties should be understood in terms of agent-directed divine attitudes, such that it is morally wrong for an agent to perform an action just in case God would be displeased with the agent for performing that action. Among the virtues of this account is its ability (...)
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  4. Matthew Carey Jordan (2012). Review ofHuman Capacities and Moral Statusby Russell DiSilvestro. [REVIEW] American Journal of Bioethics 12 (2):49-50.
    The American Journal of Bioethics, Volume 12, Issue 2, Page 49-50, February 2012.
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  5. Matthew Carey Jordan (2011). Metaphysical Naturalism and Some Moral Realisms. Philo 14 (1):5-24.
    One central question of metaethics concerns whether there are any moral facts. I argue that morality as such is characterized by a number of distinctive features, and that metaphysical naturalists should believe that there are moral facts only if there is a plausible naturalistic explanation of the existence of facts which exemplify those features. I survey three prominent (and very different) naturalistic moral theories—the reductive naturalism of Peter Railton, Frank Jackson’s analytic descriptivism, and Christine Korsgaard’s Kantianism—and argue that none of (...)
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  6. Matthew Carey Jordan (2011). Some Metaethical Desiderata and the Conceptual Resources of Theism. Sophia 50 (1):39-55.
    In this paper, I argue that theists are extremely well-situated with respect to developing metaethical accounts that qualify as ‘robust’ versions of moral realism. In the first part of the essay, a number of metaethical desiderata are identified. In the second part, theistic strategies for accommodating those desiderata are explained and defended. The upshot is that, contrary to the received philosophical wisdom, there are good theoretical reasons for theistic philosophers to seek to develop metaethical accounts that ground moral facts in (...)
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  7. Matthew Carey Jordan (2010). Bioethics and "Human Dignity&Quot;. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 35 (2):180-196.
    The term "human dignity" is the source of considerable confusion in contemporary bioethics. It has been used by Kantians to refer to autonomy, by others to refer to the sanctity of life, and by still others (e.g., the President’s Council on Bioethics) to refer—albeit obliquely—to an important but infrequently discussed set of human goods. In the first part of this article, I seek to disambiguate the notion of human dignity. The second part is a defense of the philosophical utility of (...)
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  8. Matthew Carey Jordan (2010). Theistic Ethics. Philo 12 (1):31-45.
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  9. Matthew Carey Jordan (2009). Theistic Ethics: Not as Bad as You Think. Philo 12 (1):31-45.
    Critics of theological accounts of the nature of morality have argued that such accounts must be rejected, even by theists, because such accounts (i) have the unacceptable implication that nothing is morally wrong in possible worlds in which atheism is true, (ii) render the substantive content of morality arbitrary, and (iii) make it impossible or redundant to attribute moral properties to God or God’s actions. I argue that none of these criticisms constitute good reason for theists to abandon theological accounts (...)
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