5 found
Order:
Disambiguations:
Matthew Caswell [5]Matthew David Caswell [1]
  1. Matthew Caswell (2006). The Value of Humanity and Kant's Conception of Evil. Journal of the History of Philosophy 44 (4):635-663.
    Matthew Caswell - The Value of Humanity and Kant's Conception of Evil - Journal of the History of Philosophy 44:4 Journal of the History of Philosophy 44.4 635-663 Muse Search Journals This Journal Contents The Value of Humanity and Kant's Conception of Evil Matthew Caswell Recent years have seen the development of a powerful reinterpretation of Kant's basic approach in ethical thought. Kant, it is argued, should not be read as defending the stark, metaphysics-laden formalism for which his theory is (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  2. Matthew Caswell (2006). Kant's Conception of the Highest Good, the Gesinnung, and the Theory of Radical Evil. Kant-Studien 97 (2):184-209.
    Early in the Preface to Religion within the Limits of Reason Alone, Kant claims that “morality leads ineluctably to religion”. This thesis is hardly an innovation of the Religion. Again and again throughout the critical corpus, Kant argues that religious belief is ethically significant, that it makes a morally meaningful difference whether an agent believes or disbelieves. And yet these claims are surely among the most doubted of Kant's positions – and they are often especially doubted by readers who consider (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  3.  8
    Matthew Caswell (2006). Kant's Conception of the Highest Good, the Gesinnung, and the Theory of Radical Evil. Kant-Studien 97 (2):184-209.
    Early in the Preface to Religion within the Limits of Reason Alone, Kant claims that “morality leads ineluctably to religion”. This thesis is hardly an innovation of the Religion. Again and again throughout the critical corpus, Kant argues that religious belief is ethically significant, that it makes a morally meaningful difference whether an agent believes or disbelieves. And yet these claims are surely among the most doubted of Kant's positions – and they are often especially doubted by readers who consider (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  4.  46
    Matthew Caswell (2007). Kant on the Diabolical Will: A Neglected Alternative? Kantian Review 12 (2):147-157.
    To his harshest critics, Kant's philosophy can seem an unending series of neglected alternatives. Time and again, Kant argues for his position by elimination, ruling out each possible alternative, until his own is the only one left standing. Of course, this strategy amounts to a demonstration of the Kantian position if and only if the field of possible alternatives really is – as Kant always assumes – exhaustive. But readers often suspect that Kant has stacked the deck, that his dogmatic (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  5. Matthew Caswell (2014). Book Review: Difficult Freedom and Radical Evil in Kant, Written by Joël Madore. [REVIEW] Journal of Moral Philosophy 11 (4):547-550.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography