Search results for 'Matthew Conduct' (try it on Scholar)

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Profile: Matthew David Conduct (Durham University)
  1. Matthew Conduct (2012). Response to Montague. Consciousness and Cognition 21 (2):740-741.score: 240.0
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  2. Matthew Conduct (2012). Naïve Realism Without Disjunctivism About Experience. Consciousness and Cognition 21 (2):727-736.score: 240.0
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  3. William Kapelle (2000). Matthew Strickland, War and Chivalry: The Conduct and Perception of War in England and Normandy, 1066–1217. Cambridge, Eng.: Cambridge University Press, 1996. Pp. Xxv, 387; 3 Maps and 17 Black-and-White Illustrations. $69.95. [REVIEW] Speculum 75 (4):989-991.score: 120.0
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  4. Henry Sturt (1899). Book Review:A Dialogue on Moral Education. F. H. Matthews; The Teaching of Christ on Life and Conduct. Sophie Bryant. [REVIEW] Ethics 9 (3):406-.score: 50.0
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  5. Sean T. Powell, Matthew A. Allison & Michael W. Kalichman (2007). Effectiveness of a Responsible Conduct of Research Course: A Preliminary Study. Science and Engineering Ethics 13 (2):249-264.score: 42.0
    Training in the responsible conduct of research (RCR) is required for many research trainees nationwide, but little is known about its effectiveness. For a preliminary assessment of the effectiveness of a short-term course in RCR, medical students participating in an NIH-funded summer research program at the University of California, San Diego (UCSD) were surveyed using an instrument developed through focus group discussions. In the summer of 2003, surveys were administered before and after a short-term RCR course, as well as (...)
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  6. Matthew L. Skinner (forthcoming). Book Review: What Did Jesus Do? Gospel Profiles of Jesus' Personal Conduct. [REVIEW] Interpretation 58 (4):424-426.score: 36.0
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  7. Matthew Tieu (2012). Bioethics in a Secular World: The Ethics and the Application. Bioethics Research Notes 24 (1):15.score: 30.0
    Tieu, Matthew As a contemporary academic discipline bioethics is a specialised though multidisciplinary field of study. It is the study of the ethical issues that arise from the biological and medical sciences, as well as clinical practice. It deals with important issues such as abortion, human embryonic stem cell research, euthanasia and reproductive technology, genetic modification, animal welfare, nanotechnology and neuroethics. The "Encyclopedia of Bioethics" defines bioethics as "the systematic study of the moral dimensions -including moral vision, decisions, (...) and policies -of the life sciences and health care, employing a variety of ethical methodologies in an interdisciplinary setting". Bioethics is a branch or sub-discipline of what is referred to as "applied ethics". As such, it also draws upon those disciplines that address the nature of ethics, i.e. philosophy, psychology and religion. Bioethics as an academic discipline therefore involves both the natural sciences and the humanities. (shrink)
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  8. Matthew H. Kramer (2008). Where Law and Morality Meet. Oxford University Press.score: 30.0
    How are law and morality connected, how do they interact, and in what ways are they distinct? In Part I of this book, Matthew Kramer argues that moral principles can enter into the law of any jurisdiction. He contends that legal officials can invoke moral principles as laws for resolving disputes, and that they can also invoke them as threshold tests which ordinary laws must satisfy. In opposition to many other theorists, Kramer argues that these functions of moral principles (...)
     
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  9. Jeanne M. Logsdon & Donna J. Wood (2005). Global Business Citizenship and Voluntary Codes of Ethical Conduct. Journal of Business Ethics 59 (1-2):55 - 67.score: 24.0
    This article describes the theory and process of global business citizenship (GBC) and applies it in an analysis of characteristics of company codes of business conduct. GBC is distinguished from a commonly used term, “corporate citizenship,” which often denotes corporate community involvement and philanthropy. The GBC process requires (1) a set of fundamental values embedded in the corporate code of conduct and in corporate policies that reflect universal ethical standards; (2) implementation throughout the organization with thoughtful awareness of (...)
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  10. Roberto Festa (2012). “For Unto Every One That Hath Shall Be Given”. Matthew Properties for Incremental Confirmation. Synthese 184 (1):89-100.score: 24.0
    Confirmation of a hypothesis by evidence can be measured by one of the so far known incremental measures of confirmation. As we show, incremental measures can be formally defined as the measures of confirmation satisfying a certain small set of basic conditions. Moreover, several kinds of incremental measure may be characterized on the basis of appropriate structural properties. In particular, we focus on the so-called Matthew properties: we introduce a family of six Matthew properties including the reverse (...) effect; we further prove that incremental measures endowed with reverse Matthew effect are possible; finally, we shortly consider the problem of the plausibility of Matthew properties. (shrink)
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  11. Richard C. Jennings (2004). Data Selection and Responsible Conduct: Was Millikan a Fraud? [REVIEW] Science and Engineering Ethics 10 (4):639-653.score: 24.0
    This paper addresses a problem in reporting scientific research. The problem is how to distinguish between justifiable and unjustifiable data selection. Robert Millikan is notorious for an infamous remark that he used all his data when in fact he had used a selection. On this basis he has been accused of fraud. There is a tension here — historians and his defenders see his selection as understandable and legitimate, while current statements about the Responsible Conduct of Research imply his (...)
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  12. Xiaomin Yu (2008). Impacts of Corporate Code of Conduct on Labor Standards: A Case Study of Reebok's Athletic Footwear Supplier Factory in China. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 81 (3):513 - 529.score: 24.0
    This study examines the social impacts of labor-related corporate social responsibility (CSR) policies or corporate codes of conduct on upholding labor standards through a case study of CSR discourses and codes implementation of Reebok – a leading branded company enjoying a high-profiled image for its human rights achievement – in a large Taiwanese-invested athletic footwear factory located in South China. I find although implementation of Reebok labor-related codes has resulted in a “race to ethical and legal minimum” labor standards (...)
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  13. Katherine Alfredo & Hillary Hart (2011). The University and the Responsible Conduct of Research: Who is Responsible for What? [REVIEW] Science and Engineering Ethics 17 (3):447-457.score: 24.0
    Research misconduct has been thoroughly discussed in the literature, but mainly in terms of definitions and prescriptions for proper conduct. Even when case studies are cited, they are generally used as a repository of “lessons learned.” What has been lacking from this conversation is how the lessons of responsible conduct of research are imparted in the first place to graduate students, especially those in technical fields such as engineering. Nor has there been much conversation about who is responsible (...)
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  14. Michael J. Selgelid (2009). Dual-Use Research Codes of Conduct: Lessons From the Life Sciences. [REVIEW] NanoEthics 3 (3):175-183.score: 24.0
    This paper considers multiple meanings of the expression ‘dual use’ and examines lessons to be learned from the life sciences when considering ethical and policy issues associated with the dual-use nature of nanotechnology (and converging technologies). After examining recent controversial dual-use experiments in the life sciences, it considers the potential roles and limitations of science codes of conduct for addressing concerns associated with dual-use science and technology. It concludes that, rather than being essentially associated with voluntary self-governance of the (...)
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  15. Ronald M. Atlas (2009). Responsible Conduct by Life Scientists in an Age of Terrorism. Science and Engineering Ethics 15 (3):293-301.score: 24.0
    The potential for dual use of research in the life sciences to be misused for harm raises a range of problems for the scientific community and policy makers. Various legal and ethical strategies are being implemented to reduce the threat of the misuse of research and knowledge in the life sciences by establishing a culture of responsible conduct.
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  16. W. Patrick Cunningham (1998). The Golden Rule as Universal Ethical Norm. Journal of Business Ethics 17 (1):105 - 109.score: 24.0
    "The golden rule" (Matthew 7:12) is a formulation of natural moral law, a logical way to divide good from evil. It has been attacked by J.W. Hennessey, Jr. and Bernard Gert as a "particularist preachment." On the contrary, it remains a useful, universal guide to moral conduct and cannot be considered a self-centered, subjective guide to the moral life. We must agree with Jeffrey Wattles that there are multiple possible meanings to the "rule", some legitimate and some spurious. (...)
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  17. John Dewey (1922). Human Nature and Conduct, An Introduction to Social Psychology. Henry Holt.score: 24.0
    In Human Nature and Conduct, first published in 1922, Dewey brings the rigor of natural sciences to the quest for a better moral system.
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  18. Kathryn Gordon & Maiko Miyake (2001). Business Approaches to Combating Bribery: A Study of Codes of Conduct. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 34 (3-4):161 - 173.score: 24.0
    The question of what firms do internally in the fight against bribery is probably as important to the successful outcome of that fight as formal anti-bribery law and enforcement. This paper looks at corporate approaches to anti-bribery commitment and compliance management using an inventory of 246 codes of conduct. It suggests that, while bribery is often mentioned in the codes of conduct, there is considerable diversity in the language and concepts adopted in anti-bribery commitments. This diversity is a (...)
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  19. David Molyneaux (2003). "Blessed Are the Meek, for They Shall Inherit the Earth" – an Aspiration Applicable to Business? Journal of Business Ethics 48 (4):347-363.score: 24.0
    The paper''s broad aim is to provide a wider understanding of a complex virtue, "meekness". This interest is pragmatic. Contemporary research by Collins (2001) has identified "meekness" as a personal quality for highest-level leadership at great businesses, a theme identifiable also in religious and ancient philosophical narratives. Two strands of enquiry are pursued. Firstly, features of "meekness" are inferred by reference to Plato, Aristotle and Xenophon, as also to the gospel writer, Matthew, source of the title''s quotation. It concludes (...)
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  20. Brendan O.’Dwyer & Grainne Madden (2006). Ethical Codes of Conduct in Irish Companies: A Survey of Code Content and Enforcement Procedures. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 63 (3):217 - 236.score: 24.0
    This paper reports on an investigation of issues surrounding the use of ethical codes/codes of conduct in Irish based companies. Using a comprehensive questionnaire survey, the paper examines the incidence, content and enforcement of codes of conduct among a sample of the top 1000 companies based in Ireland. The main findings indicate that the overall usage of codes of conduct amongst indigenous Irish companies has increased significantly from 1995 to 2000. However, in line with prior research, these (...)
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  21. Michael Martin (1986). Science Education and Moral Education. Journal of Moral Education 15 (2):99-108.score: 24.0
    Abstract Science education and moral education are mutually relevant. An education in science provides the factual information necessary to apply and revise ethical principles. In addition, science education aims to achieve certain propensities, e.g. impartiality, that are identical to some of the goals of moral education. Moral education, in turn, gives potential scientists the necessary principles and propensities to make certain decisions in the context of discovery, in the acceptance of hypotheses and in the conduct of inquiry. Science education (...)
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  22. Donald F. Arnold, Richard A. Bernardi, Presha E. Neidermeyer & Josef Schmee (2007). The Effect of Country and Culture on Perceptions of Appropriate Ethical Actions Prescribed by Codes of Conduct: A Western European Perspective Among Accountants. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 70 (4):327 - 340.score: 24.0
    Recognizing the growing interdependence of the European Union and the importance of codes of conduct in companies’ operations, this research examines the effect of a country’s culture on the implementation of a code of conduct in a European context. We examine whether the perceptions of an activity’s ethicality relates to elements found in company codes of conduct vary by country or according to Hofstede’s (1980, Culture’s Consequences (Sage Publications, Beverly Hills, CA)) cultural constructs of: Uncertainty Avoidance, Masculinity/Femininity, (...)
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  23. Ans Kolk & Rob van Tuldere (2002). Child Labor and Multinational Conduct: A Comparison of International Business Andstakeholder Codes. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 36 (3):291-301.score: 24.0
    Increasing attention to the issue of child labor has been reflected in codes of conduct that emerged in the past decade in particular. This paper examines the way in which multinationals, business associations, governmental and non-governmental organizations deal with child labor in their codes. With a standardized framework, it analyzes 55 codes drawn up by these different actors to influence firms external, societal behavior. The exploratory study helps to identify the main issues related to child labor and the use (...)
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  24. David L. O'Hara (2009). Review: H.G. Callaway (Ed.) R.W. Emerson, The Conduct of Life, A Philosophical Reading. [REVIEW] Newsletter of the Society for the Advancement of American Philosophy 37 (108).score: 24.0
    In the last few years H.G. Callaway has produced several helpful editions of some important texts by Emerson. Emerson's Conduct of Life was originally published in 1860, and it has appeared in a number of editions since then, but Callaway's edition has several noteworthy features that cause it to stand out from the crowd and make it an important contribution to Emerson studies. This is a rare volume that will serve students, academic philosophers, and causal readers alike: a critical (...)
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  25. Lutz Preuss (2010). Codes of Conduct in Organisational Context: From Cascade to Lattice-Work of Codes. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 94 (4):471 - 487.score: 24.0
    Codes of conduct have proliferated not only at company level, but also at supra-and suborganisational levels. However, the latter have remained an under-researched area within the CSR literature. Hence, this article examined what range of organisational and sub-organisational codes large companies - here the FTSE100 constituent companies -have developed. The article isolated seven different types of organisational and sub-organisational codes, which together with six supraorganisational ones form a lattice-work of intermeshing documents. Such a division of labour between types of (...)
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  26. Curtis Clements, John D. Neill & O. Scott Stovall (2009). An Analysis of International Accounting Codes of Conduct. Journal of Business Ethics 87 (1):173 - 183.score: 24.0
    The International Federation of Accountants (IFAC) has recently issued a revised "Code of Ethics for Professional Accountants" (IFAC Code). As a requirement for membership in IFAC, a national accounting organization must either adopt the IFAC Code or adopt a code of conduct that is not "less stringent" than the IFAC Code. In this paper, we examine the extent to which 158 national accounting organizations have adopted the revised IFAC Code as their own. Our results indicate that 80 of our (...)
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  27. S. T. Jakubowski, P. Chao, S. K. Huh & S. Maheshwari (2002). A Cross-Country Comparison of the Codes of Professional Conduct of Certified/Chartered Accountants. Journal of Business Ethics 35 (2):111 - 129.score: 24.0
    This research examines the extent to which similarities and differences exist in the codes of professional conduct of certified (chartered) accountants across the following countries: the United States, Taiwan, South Korea, Malaysia, Ontario (Canada), Australia, India, and Hong Kong. These eight countries exemplify some of the diversity in economic, political, legal, and cultural environments in which public accountants practice. The professional codes of ethics establish the ethical boundary parameters within which professional accountants must operate and they are a function (...)
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  28. Douglas R. May & Matthew T. Luth (2013). The Effectiveness of Ethics Education: A Quasi-Experimental Field Study. Science and Engineering Ethics 19 (2):545-568.score: 24.0
    Ethical conduct is the hallmark of excellence in engineering and scientific research, design, and practice. While undergraduate and graduate programs in these areas routinely emphasize ethical conduct, few receive formal ethics training as part of their curricula. The first purpose of this research study was to assess the relative effectiveness of ethics education in enhancing individuals’ general knowledge of the responsible conduct of research practices and their level of moral reasoning. Secondly, we examined the effects of ethics (...)
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  29. André Sobczak (2003). Codes of Conduct in Subcontracting Networks: A Labour Law Perspective. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 44 (2-3):225 - 234.score: 24.0
    In the past ten years, many European companies organised into subcontracting networks have decided to adopt codes of conduct to regulate labour relations and to ensure the respect of fundamental social rights. This paper first determines the context and the issues to be addressed by codes of conduct within networks of companies, and second analyses the terms under which they can be implemented. The paper argues that codes of conduct can complement the standards developed by States, the (...)
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  30. Niklas Egels-Zandén & Peter Hyllman (2007). Evaluating Strategies for Negotiating Workers' Rights in Transnational Corporations: The Effects of Codes of Conduct and Global Agreements on Workplace Democracy. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 76 (2):207 - 223.score: 24.0
    Following the offshoring of production to developing countries by transnational corporations (TNCs), unions and non-governmental organisations (NGOs) have criticised working conditions at TNCs' offshore factories. This has led to the emergence of two different approaches to operationalising TNC responsibilities for workers' rights in developing countries: codes of conduct and global agreements. Despite the importance of this development, few studies have systematically compared the effects of these two different ways of dealing with workers' rights. This article addresses this gap by (...)
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  31. Zabihollah Rezaee, Robert C. Elmore & Joseph Z. Szendi (2001). Ethical Behavior in Higher Educational Institutions: The Role of the Code of Conduct. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 30 (2):171 - 183.score: 24.0
    The report of the Treadway Commission suggests that all public companies should establish effective written codes of conduct in promoting honorable behavior by corporations. The need for written "codes of conduct" for businesses is evident in the current literature. However, there is not sufficient evidence regarding the implication of codes of conduct in a college. Academic dishonesty has become an important issue in institutions of higher education. Codes of conduct can also provide a basis for ethical (...)
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  32. Stephanie J. Bird (2001). Mentors, Advisors and Supervisors: Their Role in Teaching Responsible Research Conduct. Science and Engineering Ethics 7 (4):455-468.score: 24.0
    Although the terms mentor and thesis advisor (or research supervisor) are often used interchangeably, the responsibilities associated with these roles are distinct, even when they overlap. Neither are role models necessarily mentors, though mentors are role models: good examples are necessary but not sufficient. Mentorship is both a personal and a professional relationship. It has the potential for raising a number of ethical concerns, including issues of accuracy and reliability of the information conveyed, access, stereotyping and tracking of advisees, and (...)
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  33. Niklas Egels-Zandén (2007). Suppliers' Compliance with Mncs' Codes of Conduct: Behind the Scenes at Chinese Toy Suppliers. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 75 (1):45 - 62.score: 24.0
    Despite increased academic and practitioner interest in codes of conduct, there has been little research into the actual compliance of suppliers in developing countries with the codes of conduct of multinational corporations (MNCs). This paper addresses this lack by analysing Chinese suppliers’ level of compliance with Swedish toy retailers’ codes of conduct. Based on unannounced and unofficial interviews with employees of Chinese suppliers, the study shows that all of the nine studied suppliers breached some of the standards (...)
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  34. Geoff Goldman, Maria Bounds, Piotr Bula & Janusz Fudalinski (2012). On the Ethical Conduct of Business Organisations: A Comparison Between South African and Polish Business Management Students. African Journal of Business Ethics 6 (1):75.score: 24.0
    This study explores the opinions of Polish and South African management students regarding the ethical conduct exhibited by organisations specific to their respective home countries. Through the use of a survey, primary data were collected via a self-administered questionnaire. Non-probability sampling in the form of a quota sample was employed, and a target of 250 respondents was pursued at a South African and a Polish university respectively. The data were subjected to SPSS. The findings showed that students in South (...)
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  35. Mika Hietanen (2011). The Gospel of Matthew as a Literary Argument. Argumentation 25 (1):63-86.score: 24.0
    Through an argumentation analysis can one show how it is feasible to view a narrative religious text such as the Gospel of Matthew as a literary argument. The Gospel is not just good news but an elaborate argument for the standpoint that Jesus is the Son of God, the Messiah. It is shown why an argumentation analysis needs to be supplemented with a pragmatic literary analysis in order to describe how the evangelist presents his story so as to reach (...)
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  36. John D. Neill, O. Scott Stovall & Darryl L. Jinkerson (2005). A Critical Analysis of the Accounting Industry's Voluntary Code of Conduct. Journal of Business Ethics 59 (1-2):101 - 108.score: 24.0
    The public accounting industry’s voluntary code of conduct in the United States is the American Institute of CPA’s Code of Professional Conduct. Based on our analysis, we conclude that the accounting industry’s current code is limited in its ability to serve the public interest in three respects. Specifically, the code is input-based, requires no third-party attestation of compliance with the code, and contains no public reporting process of code compliance/noncompliance at the accounting firm level. We propose that the (...)
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  37. Beth A. Fischer & Michael J. Zigmond (2001). Promoting Responsible Conduct in Research Through “Survival Skills” Workshops: Some Mentoring is Best Done in a Crowd. Science and Engineering Ethics 7 (4):563-587.score: 24.0
    For graduate students to succeed as professionals, they must develop a set of general “survival skills”. These include writing research articles, making oral presentations, obtaining employment and funding, supervising, and teaching. Traditionally, graduate programs have offered little training in many of these skills. Our educational model provides individuals with formal instruction in each area, including their ethical dimensions. Infusion of research ethics throughout a professional skills curriculum helps to emphasize that responsible conduct is integral to succeeding as a researcher. (...)
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  38. Gitte Meyer & Peter Sandøe (2012). Going Public: Good Scientific Conduct. Science and Engineering Ethics 18 (2):173-197.score: 24.0
    The paper addresses issues of scientific conduct regarding relations between science and the media, relations between scientists and journalists, and attitudes towards the public at large. In the large and increasing body of literature on scientific conduct and misconduct, these issues seem underexposed as ethical challenges. Consequently, individual scientists here tend to be left alone with problems and dilemmas, with no guidance for good conduct. Ideas are presented about how to make up for this omission. Using a (...)
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  39. Brendan O'Dwyer & Grainne Madden (2006). Ethical Codes of Conduct in Irish Companies: A Survey of Code Content and Enforcement Procedures. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 63 (3):217 - 236.score: 24.0
    This paper reports on an investigation of issues surrounding the use of ethical codes/codes of conduct in Irish based companies. Using a comprehensive questionnaire survey, the paper examines the incidence, content and enforcement of codes of conduct among a sample of the top 1000 companies based in Ireland. The main findings indicate that the overall usage of codes of conduct amongst indigenous Irish companies has increased significantly from 1995 to 2000. However, in line with prior research, these (...)
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  40. Detlev Nitsch, Mark Baetz & Julia Christensen Hughes (2005). Why Code of Conduct Violations Go Unreported: A Conceptual Framework to Guide Intervention and Future Research. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 57 (4):327 - 341.score: 24.0
    . The ability to enforce the provisions of a code of conduct influences whether the code is effective in shaping behavior. Enforcement relies in part on the willingness of organization members to report violations of the code, but research from the business and educational environment suggests that fewer than half of those who observe code violations follow their organizations procedures for reporting them. Based on a review of the literature in the business and educational environments, and a survey of (...)
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  41. Marina Prieto-Carrón (2008). Women Workers, Industrialization, Global Supply Chains and Corporate Codes of Conduct. Journal of Business Ethics 83 (1):5 - 17.score: 24.0
    The restructured globalized economy has provided women with employment opportunities. Globalisation has also meant a shift towards self-regulation of multinationals as part of the restructuring of the world economy that increases among others things, flexible employment practices, worsening of labour conditions and lower wages for many women workers around the world. In this context, as part of the global trend emphasising Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) in the 1980s, one important development has been the growth of voluntary Corporate Codes of (...) to improve labour conditions. This article reviews from a feminist interdisciplinary perspective the broad academic literature on women workers, covering the more classical debate on women workers in the industrialization process and entering into women workers in the global supply chains and women workers and corporate codes of conduct. The main argument is that this research on women workers is crucial to frame the issues of business ethics and in particular CSR and Codes of Conduct in the context of women in the global political economy. When this crucial knowledge is ignored, then the ethical policies of the companies also ignore the real situation of the women workers at the bottom of their supply chains. (shrink)
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  42. David B. Resnik (2005). Using Electronic Discussion Boards to Teach Responsible Conduct of Research. Science and Engineering Ethics 11 (4):617-630.score: 24.0
    This study presents the results of a survey of student satisfaction with electronic discussion boards in a course on the responsible conduct of research (RCR). On a 1–5 scale, the respondents stated that the use of the electronic discussion board was an effective teaching tool (4.71), that it enabled them to get feedback from their peers (4.43), that it helped promote discussion and debate (4.36), that it helped them learn how to analyze ethical dilemmas in research (4.36), and that (...)
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  43. Glenn Branch (2009). Review of William Paley, Natural Theology , Edited with an Introduction and Notes by Matthew D. Eddy and David Knight. [REVIEW] Sophia 48 (1):99-101.score: 24.0
    Matthew D. Eddy and David Knight’s new edition of William Paley’s Natural Theology deserves to become the standard scholarly edition of what is a historically, theologically, and philosophically important work, despite a certain neglect of philosophical issues on the part of the editors.
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  44. Phil A. Brown, Morris H. Stocks & W. Mark Wilder (2007). Ethical Exemplification and the AICPA Code of Professional Conduct: An Empirical Investigation of Auditor and Public Perceptions. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 71 (1):39 - 71.score: 24.0
    This research applies the impression management theory of exemplification in an accounting study by identifying and measuring differences in both auditor and public perceptions of exemplary behaviors. The auditors were divided into two groups, one of which reported self-perceptions (A-S) while the other group reported their perceptions of a typical auditor (A-O). There were two separate public groups, which gave their perceptions of a typical auditor and were divided based on their levels of accounting sophistication. The more sophisticated public group (...)
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  45. Lars-Eric Petersen & Franciska Krings (2009). Are Ethical Codes of Conduct Toothless Tigers for Dealing with Employment Discrimination? Journal of Business Ethics 85 (4):501 - 514.score: 24.0
    This study examined the influence of two organizational context variables, codes of conduct and supervisor advice, on personnel decisions in an experimental simulation. Specifically, we studied personnel evaluations and decisions in a situation where codes of conduct conflict with supervisor advice. Past studies showed that supervisors’ advice to prefer ingroup over outgroup candidates leads to discriminatory personnel selection decisions. We extended this line of research by studying how codes of conduct and code enforcement may reduce this form (...)
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  46. Lawrence J. Rhoades (2002). Beyond Conflict of Interest: The Responsible Conduct of Research. Science and Engineering Ethics 8 (3):459-468.score: 24.0
    This paper reports data and scholarly opinion that support the perception of systemic flaws in the management of scientific professions and the research enterprise; explores the responsibility that professional status places on the scientific professions, and elaborates the concept of the responsible conduct of research (RCR). Data are presented on research misconduct, availability of research guidelines, and perceived research quality.
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  47. Daniel Walter Skubik & Bruce W. Stening (2009). What's in a Credo? A Critique of the Academy of Management's Code of Ethical Conduct and Code of Ethics. Journal of Business Ethics 85 (4):515 - 525.score: 24.0
    The Academy of Management formally adopted a Code of Ethical Conduct in 1990. During the subsequent 15 years, almost nothing had been published about it and its value as a formal document meant to guide professional practice. Rather surprisingly then, in December 2005 an entirely new Code of Ethics was introduced by the Academy’s Board, to take effect in February 2006. Why was a new code promulgated? More broadly, what do the contents of these codes, the processes of their (...)
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  48. Sandra L. Titus & Janice M. Ballou (2014). Ensuring PhD Development of Responsible Conduct of Research Behaviors: Who's Responsible? Science and Engineering Ethics 20 (1):221-235.score: 24.0
    The importance of public confidence in scientific findings and trust in scientists cannot be overstated. Thus, it becomes critical for the scientific community to focus on enhancing the strategies used to educate future scientists on ethical research behaviors. What we are lacking is knowledge on how faculty members shape and develop ethical research standards with their students. We are presenting the results of a survey with 3,500 research faculty members. We believe this is the first report on how faculty work (...)
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  49. Lieske Voget-Kleschin & Setareh Stephan (2013). The Potential of Standards and Codes of Conduct in Governing Large-Scale Land Acquisition in Developing Countries Towards Sustainability. Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 26 (6):1157-1179.score: 24.0
    Commercial interest in land (large-scale land acquisition, LaSLA) in developing countries is a hot topic for debate and its potential consequences are contentious: proponents conceive of it as much needed investment into the formerly neglected agricultural sector while opponents point to severe social and environmental effects. This contribution discusses, if and how sustainability standards and codes of conduct can contribute towards governing LaSLA. Based on the WCED-definition we develop a conception of sustainability that allows framing potential negative effects as (...)
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  50. Eugenijus Gefenas (2006). The Concept of Risk and Responsible Conduct of Research. Science and Engineering Ethics 12 (1):75-83.score: 24.0
    Assessment of risk is one of the key issues in the field of responsible conduct of research which covers discourses of research ethics and research integrity. The principle of minimizing risks and balancing of risks and benefits is one of the main requirements of research ethics. In addition, the content of informed consent that is another fundamental principle of research ethics derives from the assessment of risks and benefits related to a particular research project. Risk assessment also plays a (...)
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