Search results for 'Matthew David' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Matthew David & Iain Wilkinson (2002). Critical Theory of Society or Self-Critical Society? Critical Horizons 3 (1):131-158.score: 240.0
    This paper presents a critical comparative reading of Ulrich Beck and Herbert Marcuse. Beck's thesis on 'selfcritical society' and the concept of 'sub-politics' are evaluated within the framework of Marcusian critical theory. We argue for the continued relevance of Marcuse for the project of emancipatory politics. We recognise that a focus upon the imminent and spontaneous possibilities for radical social change within the 'sub-political' is a useful provocation to the high abstractionism of much critical theory, but suggest that such possibilities (...)
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  2. Michael Dauphinais, Barry David, Matthew Levering, Kevin L. Hester & Emmanuel Housset (2007). Jason Byassee, Praise Seeking Understanding: Reading the Psalms with Augustine. Radical Traditions—Theology in a Postcritical Key. Grand Rapids, MI, and Cambridge, UK: Eerdmans, 2007. Remo Cacitti, Furiosa Turba. I Fondamenti Religiosi Dell'eversione Sociale, Della Dissidenza Politica E Della Contestazione Ecclesiale Dei Circoncellioni d'Africa. [REVIEW] Augustinian Studies 38 (2):469-470.score: 240.0
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  3. Matthew David (2005). Science in Society. Palgrave Macmillan.score: 240.0
    Science/Technoscience has moved to center stage in debates over change, power and justice in twenty-first century societies. This text provides a general framework for understanding, combining and applying the rich range of approaches that exist within sociology about science: in particular, the role (and limitations) of science in generating knowledge, and the relationship between scientific knowledge and social progress. Drawing on case studies such as the genetics and computing "revolutions," this is a clear, even-handed and comprehensive introduction to the field.
     
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  4. Glenn Branch (2009). Review of William Paley, Natural Theology , Edited with an Introduction and Notes by Matthew D. Eddy and David Knight. [REVIEW] Sophia 48 (1):99-101.score: 144.0
    Matthew D. Eddy and David Knight’s new edition of William Paley’s Natural Theology deserves to become the standard scholarly edition of what is a historically, theologically, and philosophically important work, despite a certain neglect of philosophical issues on the part of the editors.
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  5. Thomas Frangenberg & Ludovico David (1994). The Geometry of a Dome: Ludovico David 's Dichiarazione Della Pittura Della Capella Del Collegio Clementino di Roma. Journal of the Warburg and Courtauld Institutes 57:191-208.score: 120.0
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  6. E. G. Turner, M. David, B. A. van Groningen, J. C. van Oven, E. Boswinkel, E. P. Wegener, A. H. R. E. Paap, M. Hombert & Cl Preaux (1953). Papyrologica Lugduno-Batava, edidit Institutum Papyrologicum Universitatis Lugduno-Batavae, moderantibus M. David, B. A. van Groningen, J. C. van Oven. I. The Warren PapyriPapyrologica Lugduno-Batava, edidit Institutum Papyrologicum Universitatis Lugduno-Batavae, moderantibus M. David, B. A. van Groningen, J. C. van Oven. II. Einige Wiener PapyriPapyrologica Lugduno-Batava, edidit Institutum Papyrologicum Universitatis Lugduno-Batavae, moderantibus M. David, B. A. van Groningen, J. C. van Oven. III. Some Oxford PapyriPapyrologica Lugduno-Batava, edidit Institutum Papyrologicum Universitatis Lugduno-Batavae, moderantibus M. David, B. A. van Groningen, J. C. van Oven. IV. De Herodoti reliquiis in papyris et membranis Aegyptiis servatisPapyrologica Lugduno-Batava, edidit Institutum Papyrologicum Universitatis Lugduno-Batavae, moderantibus M. David, B. A. van Groningen, J. C. van Oven. V. Recherches sur le Recensement dans l'Egypte romaine (P. Brux. Inv. E7616)Papyrologica Lugduno-Batava,. [REVIEW] Journal of Hellenic Studies 73:163.score: 120.0
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  7. Evans David (2007). The Ethics of War Richard Sorabji & David Rodin (Eds.) Ashgate, 2006, Pp. IX+ 253. Philosophy 82 (2):370.score: 120.0
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  8. García Bacca & Juan David (2002). Ensayos y Estudios de Juan David García Bacca. Fundación Para la Cultura Urbana.score: 120.0
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  9. Archard David (forthcoming). Should We Teach Patriotism?/David Archard. Studies in Philosophy and Education.–Ny.score: 120.0
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  10. Jennifer Lapum, Terrence Yau, Kathryn Church, Perin Ruttonsha & Alison Matthews David (forthcoming). Un-Earthing Emotions Through Art: Facilitating Reflective Practice with Poetry and Photographic Imagery. [REVIEW] Journal of Medical Humanities:1-6.score: 80.0
    In this article, we comment upon and provide an arts-informed example of an emotive-focused reflection of a health care practitioner. Specifically, we use poetry and photographic imagery as tools to un-earth practitioners’ emotions within agonizing and traumatic clinical encounters. In order to recognize one’s own humanness and authentically engage in the art of medicine, we immerse ourselves in the first author’s poetic and photographic self-reflection. The poem and image are intended to inspire interpretation and meaning based on the reader’s own (...)
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  11. Dorit Bar-On (2010). Avowals: Expression, Security, and Knowledge: Reply to Matthew Boyle, David Rosenthal, and Maura Tumulty. [REVIEW] Acta Analytica 25 (1):47-63.score: 72.0
    In my reply to Boyle, Rosenthal, and Tumulty, I revisit my view of avowals’ security as a matter of a special immunity to error, their character as intentional expressive acts that employ self-ascriptive vehicles (without being grounded in self-beliefs), Moore’s paradox, the idea of expressing as contrasting with reporting and its connection to showing one’s mental state, and the ‘performance equivalence’ between avowals and other expressive acts.
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  12. Martin Montminy (2013). Explaining Dubious Assertions. Philosophical Studies 165 (3):825-830.score: 72.0
    David Sosa argues that the knowledge account of assertion is unsatisfactory, because it cannot explain the oddness of what he calls dubious assertions. One such dubious assertion is of the form ‘P but I do not know whether I know that p.’ Matthew Benton has attempted to show how proponents of the knowledge account can explain what’s wrong this assertion. I show that Benton’s explanation is inadequate, and propose my own explanation of the oddness of this dubious assertion. (...)
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  13. Jonathan Joseph (2007). Critical Realism and Postwar British Politics: Review of Postwar British Politics in Perspective by David Marsh, Jim Buller, Colin Hay, Jim Johnson, Peter Kerr, Stuart McAnulla and Matthew Watson. [REVIEW] Journal of Critical Realism 3 (1).score: 72.0
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  14. Nicholas King (2009). Matthew and His Christian Contemporaries (Library of NT Studies 333). Edited by David C. Sim and Boris Repschinski. Heythrop Journal 50 (1):160-161.score: 72.0
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  15. B. Kerkhove (2011). Dialectics in Action, World at Stake. Review of “Bridges to the World. A Dialogue on the Construction of Knowledge, Education, and Truth” by David Kenneth Johnson & Matthew R. Silliman. [REVIEW] Constructivist Foundations 7 (1):78-80.score: 72.0
    Upshot: This is a deceptively profound, compact book that can be inscribed in the grand tradition of philosophical dialogue. It confronts naive realism and radical constructivism, arriving at a seemingly workable conciliatory position.
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  16. Paul Brazier (2012). Christian Ethics as Witness: Barth's Ethics for a World at Risk. By David Haddorff. Pp. Xxii, 482, Cambridge, James Clarke, 2010, £28, $58, €40.99. Ethics with Barth: God, Metaphysics and Morals. By Matthew Rose. Pp. Viii, 226, Farnham, Surrey, Ashgate, 2010, £50, $89.95, €63.99. The Analogy of Grace. By Gerald McKenny. Pp. Xiv, 310, Oxford University Press, 2010, £68, $120, €82.99. [REVIEW] Heythrop Journal 53 (4):722-723.score: 72.0
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  17. Martin McNamara (2012). Matthew (Baker Exegetical Commentary on the New Testament). By David L. Turner. Pp. Xx, 828. Baker Academic, Grand Rapids, MI, 2008, $34.64. [REVIEW] Heythrop Journal 53 (2):334-335.score: 72.0
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  18. A. J. Woodman (1989). Recent Studies of Horace's Odes Matthew S. Santirocco: Unity and Design in Horace's Odes. Pp. X + 251. Chapel Hill and London: University of North Carolina Press, 1986. £24. David H. Porter: Horace's Poetic Journey: A Reading of Odes 1–3. Pp. Xiv + 281; 9 Diagrams. Princeton University Press, 1987. £22. Peter Connor: Horace's Lyric Poetry: The Force of Humour. (Ramus Monographs, 2.) Pp. X + 221. Victoria: Aureal Publications, 1987. Australian $24. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 39 (02):208-211.score: 72.0
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  19. Ellen T. Charry (2009). John Paul II and the Jewish People: A Jewish‐Christian Dialogue – Edited by David G. Dalin and Matthew Levering. Modern Theology 25 (3):523-526.score: 72.0
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  20. Silvia Benso & Brian Schroeder (2007). Agamben, Giorgio. Sovereignty & Life. Edited by Matthew Calarco and Steven DeCaroli. Palo Alto, CA: Stanford University Press, 2007. Pp. Xii+ 282. Paper, $21.95. Ambuel, David. Image and Paradigm in Plato's Sophist. Las Vegas, NV: Parmenides Publishing, 2006. Pp. Vii+ 279. Cloth, $32.00. Arikha, Noga. Passions and Tempers: A History of the Humours. New York, NY: HarperCollins Publishers. [REVIEW] Journal of the History of Philosophy 45 (4):681-84.score: 72.0
  21. Daniel B. Gallagher (2009). Michael Dauphinais, Barry David, and Matthew Levering, Eds., Aquinas the Augustinian. Philosophy in Review 29 (2):100.score: 72.0
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  22. J. P. Maxwell, R. S. W. Masters, F. F. Eves, R. P. Behrendt, Jonathan M. Smallwood, Simona F. Baracaia, Michelle Lowe & Marc Obonsawin (2003). Barbara H. Basden, David R. Basden, and Matthew J. Wright. Part-List Reexposure and Release Of. Consciousness and Cognition 12:320.score: 72.0
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  23. Laura Sava (2010). David E. Morrison, Matthew Kieran, Michael Svennevig and Sarah Ventress (2007) Media & Values. Intimate Transgressions in a Changing Moral and Cultural Landscape. Film-Philosophy 14 (1):361-366.score: 72.0
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  24. B. Van Kerkhove (2011). Dialectics in Action, World at Stake. Review of “Bridges to the World. A Dialogue on the Construction of Knowledge, Education, and Truth” by David Kenneth Johnson & Matthew R. Silliman. [REVIEW] Constructivist Foundations 7 (1):78-80.score: 72.0
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  25. Jennifer L. Woodrow (2012). Bridges to Autonomy: Paradoxes in Teaching and Learning, by Matthew R. Silliman and David Kenneth Johnson. Teaching Philosophy 35 (3):334-339.score: 72.0
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  26. Matthew Giancarlo (2011). David Matthews, Writing to the King: Nation, Kingship, and Literature in England, 1250–1350. (Cambridge Studies in Medieval Literature, 77.) Cambridge, Eng., and New York: Cambridge University Press, 2010. Pp. Xv, 221; 3 Tables. $85. [REVIEW] Speculum 86 (4):1097-1098.score: 42.0
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  27. Matthew Kieran (2010). Teaching & Learning Guide For: Art, Morality and Ethics: On the (Im)Moral Character of Art Works and Inter-Relations to Artistic Value. Philosophy Compass 5 (5):426-431.score: 30.0
    Up until fairly recently it was philosophical orthodoxy – at least within analytic aesthetics broadly construed – to hold that the appreciation and evaluation of works as art and moral considerations pertaining to them are conceptually distinct. However, following on from the idea that artistic value is broader than aesthetic value, the last 15 years has seen an explosion of interest in exploring possible inter-relations between the appreciative and ethical character of works as art. Consideration of these issues has a (...)
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  28. Nancy Vansieleghem & David Kennedy (2011). What is Philosophy for Children, What is Philosophy with Children—After Matthew Lipman? Journal of Philosophy of Education 45 (2):171-182.score: 30.0
    Philosophy for Children arose in the 1970s in the US as an educational programme. This programme, initiated by Matthew Lipman, was devoted to exploring the relationship between the notions ‘philosophy’ and ‘childhood’, with the implicit practical goal of establishing philosophy as a full-fledged ‘content area’ in public schools. Over 40 years, the programme has spread worldwide, and the theory and practice of doing philosophy for or with children and young people appears to be of growing interest in the field (...)
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  29. David Bain (2005). Daniel Dennett. Reconciling Science and Our Self-Conception. By Matthew. [REVIEW] Philosophical Quarterly 55 (219):369-371.score: 30.0
    Review of Matthew's Elton's book, *Daniel Dennett: Reconciling Science and Our Self-Conception*.
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  30. Robert C. Hill (2007). Judges and Ruth (the New Cambridge Bible Commentary). By Victor H. Matthews and Judges (Blackwell Bible Commentaries). By David M. Gunn. [REVIEW] Heythrop Journal 48 (3):460–461.score: 30.0
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  31. David Grumett (2005). The Enlightenment of the Magi: Faith and Reason in Matthew 2:1–12. Philosophy and Theology 17 (1/2):3-16.score: 30.0
    Matthew’s account of the journey of the magi to Jesus has been employed in historical theology to articulate the relation between reason and faith in four different ways: i) reason and faith forming a unity; ii) reason cooperating with faith; iii) reason being the tool of faith; iv) reason being superseded by faith. The paper considers each of these categories in turn, and thus progressively separates the two terms. It demonstrates that “faith” and “reason” are equivocal concepts, and that (...)
     
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  32. Matthew C. Haug (ed.) (2013). Philosophical Methodology: The Armchair or the Laboratory? Routledge.score: 30.0
    What methodology should philosophers follow? Should they rely on methods that can be conducted from the armchair? Or should they leave the armchair and turn to the methods of the natural sciences, such as experiments in the laboratory? Or is this opposition itself a false one? Arguments about philosophical methodology are raging in the wake of a number of often conflicting currents, such as the growth of experimental philosophy, the resurgence of interest in metaphysical questions, and the use of formal (...)
     
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  33. Matthew H. Kramer (2001). Dogmas and Distortions: Legal Positivism Defended. Oxford Journal of Legal Studies 21 (4):673-701.score: 30.0
    In a recent full‐length review of Matthew Kramer's In Defense of Legal Positivism, David Dyzenhaus has attacked legal positivists' accounts of adjudication and their views of the relationship between law and morality. The present essay defends legal positivism against his strictures, by arguing that he has misunderstood specific texts and the general lines of enquiry which the positivists pursue.
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  34. Michael Otsuka (1994). Killing the Innocent in Self-Defense. Philosophy and Public Affairs 23 (1):74–94.score: 24.0
    I presented an earlier version of this paper to the Law and Philosophy Discussion Group in Los Angeles, whose members I would like to thank for their comments. In addition, I would also like to thank the following people for reading and providing written or verbal commentary on earlier drafts: Robert Mams, Rogers Albritton, G. A. Cohen, David Copp, Matthew Hanser, Craig Ihara, Brian Lee, Marc Lange, Derk Pereboom, Carol Voeller, and the Editors of Philosophy & Public Affairs. (...)
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  35. Matthew A. Benton (2013). Dubious Objections From Iterated Conjunctions. Philosophical Studies 162 (2):355-358.score: 24.0
    The knowledge account of assertion—-roughly: one should not assert what one does not know—-can explain a variety of Moorean conjunctions, a fact often cited as evidence in its favor. David Sosa ("Dubious Assertions," Phil Studies, 2009) has objected that the account does not generalize satisfactorily, since it cannot explain the infelicity of certain iterated conjunctions without appealing to the controversial "KK" principle. This essay responds by showing how the knowledge account can handle such conjunctions without use of the KK (...)
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  36. John Lemos (2004). Psychological Hedonism, Evolutionary Biology, and the Experience Machine. Philosophy of the Social Sciences 34 (4):506-526.score: 24.0
    In the second half of their recent, critically acclaimed book Unto Others: The Evolution and Psychology of Unselfish Behavior , Elliott Sober and David Sloan Wilson discuss psychological hedonism. This is the view that avoiding our own pain and increasing our own pleasure are the only ultimate motives people have. They argue that none of the traditional philosophical arguments against this view are good, and they go on to present theirownevolutionary biological argument against it. Interestingly, the first half of (...)
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  37. Dorit Ganson (2008). Evidentialism and Pragmatic Constraints on Outright Belief. Philosophical Studies 139 (3):441 - 458.score: 24.0
    Evidentialism is the view that facts about whether or not an agent is justified in having a particular belief are entirely determined by facts about the agent’s evidence; the agent’s practical needs and interests are irrelevant. I examine an array of arguments against evidentialism (by Jeremy Fantl, Matthew McGrath, David Owens, and others), and demonstrate how their force is affected when we take into account the relation between degrees of belief and outright belief. Once we are sensitive to (...)
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  38. Jeremy Waldron, The Core of the Case Against Judicial Review.score: 24.0
    author. University Professor in the School of Law, Columbia University. (From July 2006, Professor of Law, New York University.) Earlier versions of this Essay were presented at the Colloquium in Legal and Social Philosophy at University College London, at a law faculty workshop at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem, and at a constitutional law conference at Harvard Law School. I am particularly grateful to Ronald Dworkin, Ruth Gavison, and Seana Shiffrin for their formal comments on those occasions and also to (...)
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  39. S. Matthew Liao, Julian Savulescu & David Wasserman (2008). The Ethics of Enhancement. Journal of Applied Philosophy 25 (3):159-161.score: 24.0
  40. Ryan Wasserman (2010). Teaching & Learning Guide For: The Problem of Change. Philosophy Compass 5 (3):283-286.score: 24.0
    Our world is a world of change. Children are born and grow into adults. Material possessions rust and decay with age and ultimately perish. Yet scepticism about change is as old as philosophy itself. Heraclitus, for example, argued that nothing could survive the replacement of parts, so that it is impossible to step into the same river twice. Zeno argued that motion is paradoxical, so that nothing can alter its location. Parmenides and his followers went even further, arguing that the (...)
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  41. Matthew P. Spackman & David Miller (2008). Embodying Emotions: What Emotion Theorists Can Learn From Simulations of Emotions. [REVIEW] Minds and Machines 18 (3):357-372.score: 24.0
    Cognitively-oriented theories have dominated the recent history of the study of emotion. However, critics of this perspective suggest the role of the body in the experience of emotion is largely ignored by cognitive theorists. As an alternative to the cognitive perspective, critics are increasingly pointing to William James’ theory, which emphasized somatic aspects of emotions. This emerging emphasis on the embodiment of emotions is shared by those in the field of AI attempting to model human emotions. Behavior-based agents in AI (...)
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  42. Mark A. Levine, Matthew K. Wynia, Paul M. Schyve, J. Russell Teagarden, David A. Fleming, Sharon King Donohue, Ron J. Anderson, James Sabin & Ezekiel J. Emanuel (2007). Improving Access to Health Care: A Consensus Ethical Framework to Guide Proposals for Reform. Hastings Center Report 37 (5):14-19.score: 24.0
  43. David Wasserman & S. Matthew Liao (2008). Issues in the Pharmacological Induction of Emotions. Journal of Applied Philosophy 25 (3):178-192.score: 24.0
    abstract In this paper, we examine issues raised by the possibility of regulating emotions through pharmacological means. We argue that emotions induced through these means can be authentic phenomenologically, and that the manner of inducing them need not make them any less our own than emotions arising 'naturally'. We recognize that in taking drugs to induce emotions, one may lose opportunities for self-knowledge; act narcissistically; or treat oneself as a mere means. But we propose that there are circumstances in which (...)
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  44. Emanuela Bianchi (ed.) (1999). Is Feminist Philosophy Philosophy? Northwestern University Press.score: 24.0
    Drawing attention to the vexed relationship between feminist theory and philosophy, Is Feminist Philosophy Philosophy? demonstrates the spectrum of significant work being done at this contested boundary. The volume offers clear statements by seventeen distinguished scholars as well as a full range of philosophical approaches; it also presents feminist philosophers in conversation both as feminists and as philosophers, making the book accessible to a wide audience. -/- Table of Contents -/- Opening plenary: Drucilla Cornell, Jacques Derrida, and Teresa Brennan — (...)
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  45. Steven Galt Crowell (ed.) (2012). The Cambridge Companion to Existentialism. Cambridge University Press.score: 24.0
    Machine generated contents note: Part I. Introduction: Introduction; 1. Existentialism and its legacy Steven Crowell; Part II. Existentialism in Historical Perspective: 2. Existentialism as a philosophical movement David E. Cooper; 3. Existentialism as a cultural movement William McBride; Part III. Major Existentialist Philosophers: 4. Kierkegaard's single individual and the point of indirect communication Alastair Hannay; 5. 'What a monster then is man': Pascal and Kierkegaard on being a contradictory self and what to do about it Hubert L. Dreyfus; 6. (...)
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  46. S. Matthew Liao, Julian Savulescu & David Wasserman (2008). The Ethics of Enhancement. Journal of Applied Philosophy 25 (3):159-161.score: 24.0
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  47. Matthew Kieran (2001). Hume, Holism and Miracles by David Johnson, Cornell University Press, Ithaca and London, 1999, Pp. 106 £22.95 Hb. Philosophy 76 (2):312-327.score: 24.0
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  48. Matthew Simpson (2008). Russell Hardin, David Hume: Moral and Political Theorist. [REVIEW] Ethics 118 (3):549-553.score: 24.0
  49. David Oliver, Matthew Statler & Johan Roos (2010). A Meta-Ethical Perspective on Organizational Identity. Journal of Business Ethics 94 (3):427 - 440.score: 24.0
    Although much of the growing literature on organizational identity implicitly recognizes the normative nature of identity, the ethical implications of organizational identity work and talk have not yet been explored in depth. Working from a meta-ethical perspective, we claim that the dynamic, processual, and temporal activities recently associated with organizational identity always have an ethical dimension, whether "good" or "bad." In order to describe the ethical dimensions of organizational identity, we introduce the balance theory of practical wisdom as a theoretical (...)
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  50. Matthew Clayton & David Stevens (2014). When God Commands Disobedience: Political Liberalism and Unreasonable Religions. Res Publica 20 (1):65-84.score: 24.0
    Some religiously devout individuals believe divine command can override an obligation to obey the law where the two are in conflict. At the extreme, some individuals believe that acts of violence that seek to change or punish a political community, or to prevent others from violating what they take to be God’s law, are morally justified. In the face of this apparent clash between religious and political commitments it might seem that modern versions of political morality—such as John Rawls’s political (...)
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