Search results for 'Matthew H. Wilder' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Anup Doshi, Cuong Tran, Matthew H. Wilder, Michael C. Mozer & Mohan M. Trivedi (2012). Sequential Dependencies in Driving. Cognitive Science 36 (5):948-963.score: 870.0
    The effect of recent experience on current behavior has been studied extensively in simple laboratory tasks. We explore the nature of sequential effects in the more naturalistic setting of automobile driving. Driving is a safety-critical task in which delayed response times may have severe consequences. Using a realistic driving simulator, we find significant sequential effects in pedal-press response times that depend on the history of recent stimuli and responses. Response times are slowed up to 100 ms in particular cases, a (...)
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  2. Phil A. Brown, Morris H. Stocks & W. Mark Wilder (2007). Ethical Exemplification and the AICPA Code of Professional Conduct: An Empirical Investigation of Auditor and Public Perceptions. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 71 (1):39 - 71.score: 280.0
    This research applies the impression management theory of exemplification in an accounting study by identifying and measuring differences in both auditor and public perceptions of exemplary behaviors. The auditors were divided into two groups, one of which reported self-perceptions (A-S) while the other group reported their perceptions of a typical auditor (A-O). There were two separate public groups, which gave their perceptions of a typical auditor and were divided based on their levels of accounting sophistication. The more sophisticated public group (...)
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  3. Esther Isabelle Wilder & William H. Walters (2007). The Cost Implications of Open-Access Publishing in the Life Sciences. BioScience 57 (7):619-625.score: 240.0
    Open-access journals are growing in number and importance. Because they rely on revenue from publication fees rather than subscriptions, these journals have important economic implications for the institutions that sponsor, produce, and use research in the life sciences. This article shows how the wholesale adoption of open-access pricing would influence institutional journal costs in the field of cell biology Estimating prices under two open-access models, we find that a switch to open access would result in substantial cost reductions for most (...)
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  4. Charles B. Woodbury & David H. Wilder (1954). The Principle of Selective Association of Drive Stimuli. Journal of Experimental Psychology 47 (5):301.score: 240.0
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  5. Christopher P. Dunn (1996). Our Nation's Lands These American Lands: Parks, Wilderness, and the Public Lands D. Zaslowsky T. H. Watkins. BioScience 46 (3):209-210.score: 40.0
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  6. George Levine (1983). Matthew Arnold: The Artist in the Wilderness. Critical Inquiry 9 (3):469.score: 40.0
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  7. Dalma H. Brunauer (1972). Creative Faith in Wilder's The Eighth Day. Renascence 25 (1):46-56.score: 36.0
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  8. Thomas H. Birch (1990). The Incarceration of Wildness: Wilderness Areas as Prisons. Environmental Ethics 12 (1):3-26.score: 14.0
    Even with the very best intentions , Western culture’s approach to wilderness and wildness, the otherness of nature, tends to be one of imperialistic domination and appropriation. Nevertheless, in spite of Western culture’s attempt to gain total control over nature by imprisoning wildness in wilderness areas, which are meant to be merely controlled “simulations” of wildness, a real wildness, a real otherness, can still be found in wilderness reserves . This wildness can serve as the literal ground for the subversion (...)
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  9. Peter H. Hare (1985). The Wilderness and the City. American Classical Philosophy as a Moral Quest. Journal of the History of Philosophy 23 (4):601-602.score: 12.0
    inquiry that ultimately concerns the nature of knowing. The traditional name for it is epistemology. Dihhey wanted to pursue it without jumping beyond the historical reflection of historically situated inquirers to a static, trans-historical standpoint. Rorty apparently does not want to pursue it on any basis. Yet his position is born of extensive, and often insightful, historical interpretation, which seems to be more than a "way of coping" (or refusing to cope) with the history of modern philosophy, His interpretations make (...)
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  10. Gloria H. Albrecht (forthcoming). Book Review: Wilderness Wanderings: Probing Twentieth-Century Theology and Philosophy. [REVIEW] Interpretation 53 (2):208-210.score: 12.0
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  11. H. Sterling Burnett (1998). Wrongness, Wisdom, and Wilderness. Review of Metaphysics 52 (2):482-484.score: 12.0
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  12. J. Baird Callicott (forthcoming). A Critique of and an Alternative to the Wilderness Idea. Environmental Ethics, A. Light and H. Rolston (Eds), Blackwell Publishing, Oxford.score: 12.0
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  13. Louis-Etienne Pigeon & Lyne Létourneau (forthcoming). The Leading Canadian NGOs' Discourse on Fish Farming: From Ecocentric Intuitions to Biocentric Solutions. Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics:1-19.score: 8.0
    The development of the aquaculture industry in Canada has triggered a conflict of a scope never seen before. As stated in Young and Matthews’ The Aquaculture Controversy, this debate has “mushroomed over the past several decades to become one of the most bitter and stubborn face-offs over industrial development ever witnessed in Canada” (Young and Matthews in The aquaculture controversy in Canada. Activism, policy and contested science. UBC Press, Vancouver, p 3, 2010). It opposes a wide variety of actors: from (...)
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  14. Mark H. Dixon (2009). The Architecture of Solitude. Environment, Space, Place 1 (1):53-72.score: 4.0
    As a spiritual or meditative practice solitude implies more than mere silence or being alone. While these are perhaps indispensablecomponents, it is possible to be alone or to live in silence and nevertheless be unable to reconfigure these into genuine solitude. Solitude is also more than being in some remote or inaccessible place. Even though geographical isolation might be conducive to solitude, with rare exceptions human beings have seldom sought solitude in complete seclusion in the wilderness. The places where human (...)
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  15. Matthew Gowans & Philip Cafaro (2003). A Latter-Day Saint Environmental Ethic. Environmental Ethics 25 (4):375-394.score: 4.0
    The doctrines and teachings of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints support and even demand a strong environmental ethic. Such an ethic is grounded in the inherent value of all souls and in God’s commandment of stewardship. Latter-day Saint doctrine declares that all living organisms have souls and explicitly states that the ability of creatures to know some degree of satisfaction and happiness should be honored. God’s own concern for the well-being and progress of all life, and His (...)
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  16. Steven H. Corey (2005). Public Health and Environmentalism. Environmental Ethics 27 (1):3-21.score: 4.0
    There exists in the United States a popular account of the historical roots of environmental philosophy which is worth noting not simply as a matter of historical interest, but also as a source book for some of the key ideas that lend shape to contemporary North American environmental philosophy. However, this folk wisdom about the historical beginnings of North American environmental thinking is incomplete. The wilderness-based history commonly used by environmental philosophers should be supplemented with the neglected story of garbage (...)
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  17. Christopher J. Preston & Steven H. Corey (2005). Public Health and Environmentalism: Adding Garbarge to the History of Environmental Ethics. Environmental Ethics 27 (1):3-21.score: 4.0
    There exists in the United States a popular account of the historical roots of environmental philosophy which is worth noting not simply as a matter of historical interest, but also as a source book for some of the key ideas that lend shape to contemporary North American environmental philosophy. However, this folk wisdom about the historical beginnings of North American environmental thinking is incomplete. The wilderness-based history commonly used by environmental philosophers should be supplemented with the neglected story of garbage (...)
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  18. H. P. P. Lotter (2005). Should Humans Interfere in the Lives of Elephants? Koers 70 (4):775-813.score: 4.0
    Culling seems to be a cruel method of human interference in the lives of elephants. The method of culling is generally used to control population numbers of highly developed mammals to protect vegetation and habitat for other less important species. Many people are against human interference in the lives of elephants. In this article aspects of this highly controversial issue are explored. Three fascinating characteristics of this ethical dilemma are discussed in the introductory part, and then the major arguments raised (...)
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