10 found
Sort by:
  1. Matthew J. Kisner & Andrew Youpa (eds.) (2014). Essays on Spinoza's Ethical Theory. Oup Oxford.
    Thirteen original essays by leading scholars explore aspects of Spinoza's ethical theory and, in doing so, deepen our understanding of it as the richly rewarding core of his system. They resolve interpretive difficulties, advance longstanding debates, and point the direction for future research.
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. Matthew J. Kisner (2012). Spinoza's Liberalism. Philosophy Compass 7 (11):782-793.
    While Spinoza’s political philosophy is often described as liberal, it is not always clear what this label means or whether it is warranted. Calling Spinoza ‘liberal’ implies that he belongs to a historical tradition of political philosophers, who formulated and defended claims, which later became identified as central to political liberalism. Consequently, clarifying how Spinoza is a liberal requires specifying precisely which liberal views he articulated and defended. This paper, first, examines the various ways that commentators have interpreted Spinoza as (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. Matthew J. Kisner (2011). Spinoza on Human Freedom: Reason, Autonomy and the Good Life. Cambridge University Press.
    Machine generated contents note: Abbreviations and translations; Introduction: beyond therapy; 1. Freedom as rationality; 2. Justifying Spinoza's conception of freedom; 3. Autonomy and responsibility; 4. Freedom and happiness; 5. The good; 6. The natural law; 7. Benevolence; 8. The free man; 9. Rational deliberation; 10. The character of freedom; 11. The freedom of the citizen; Conclusion: 'the true freedom of man'; Bibliography; Index.
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. Matthew J. Kisner (2010). Perfection and Desire: Spinoza on the Good. Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 91 (1):97-117.
    While Spinoza claims that our good is both what increases our essential power and what helps us to satisfy our desires, he admits that people desire things that do not increase their power. This paper addresses this problem by arguing that Spinoza conceives of desires as expressions of our conatus , so that satisfying our desires necessarily increases our power and vice versa. This reading holds, in opposition to recent work, that Spinoza upholds a desire-satisfaction theory of the good, though (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. Matthew J. Kisner (2009). Spinoza's Benevolence: The Rational Basis for Acting to the Benefit of Others. Journal of the History of Philosophy 47 (4):pp. 549-567.
    This paper is concerned with Spinoza’s treatment of a problem in early modern moral philosophy: the potential conflict between the pursuit of happiness and virtue. The problem is that people are thought to attain happiness by pursuing their self-interest, whereas virtue requires them to act with benevolence, for the benefit of others. Given the inevitability that people will have different and often competing interests, how can they be both virtuous and happy and, where the two are in conflict, which should (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  6. Matthew J. Kisner (2008). Review of Tammy Nyden-Bullock, Spinoza's Radical Cartesian Mind. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2008 (2).
  7. Matthew J. Kisner (2008). Spinoza's Virtuous Passions. Review of Metaphysics 61 (4):759-783.
  8. Matthew J. Kisner (2005). Scepticism and the Early Descartes. British Journal for the History of Philosophy 13 (2):207 – 232.
  9. Matthew J. Kisner (2003). Descartes' Naturalistic Rationalism. Dissertation, University of California, San Diego
    How are we to understand Descartes' view on the power and scope of reason? According to a common view, Descartes traffics in what I call 'theocentric rationalism.' Theocentric rationalism holds that human reason resembles divine reason, according to which God created the world. A hallmark of this view is the notion that knowledge should be analyzed and evaluated according to the standards of cognition achievable by God. ;My dissertation argues that Descartes resisted treating human reason as resembling divine reason. This (...)
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  10. Matthew J. Kisner (2002). Descartes Embodied. International Philosophical Quarterly 42 (3):412-414.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation