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Matthew King [9]Matthew J. King [1]
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Profile: Matthew King (York University)
  1. Matthew J. King, Lori-Anne Williams, Arlene G. MacDougall, Shelley Ferris, Julia R. V. Smith, Natalia Ziolkowski & Margaret C. McKinnon (2011). Patients with Bipolar Disorder Show a Selective Deficit in the Episodic Simulation of Future Events. Consciousness and Cognition 20 (4):1801-1807.
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  2. Matthew King (2009). Clarifying the Foucault—Habermas Debate: Morality, Ethics, and `Normative Foundations'. Philosophy and Social Criticism 35 (3):287-314.
    Habermas charges that Foucault's work `cannot account for its normative foundations'. Responses to Habermas have consisted mostly of, on one hand, attempts to identify foundational normative assumptions implicit in Foucault's work, and, on the other hand, attempts to show that Foucault's work discredits the very idea of normative foundations. These attempts have suffered from a lack of clarity about Habermas' notion of normative foundations. In this article I clarify the terms of the debate by considering Habermas' critique of Foucault in (...)
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  3. Matthew King (2009). Heidegger and Happiness: Dwelling on Fitting and Being. Continuum.
    If we were going to analyse the term 'happiness', we would want, for instance, to separate out its sense from those of ... We would be trying to determine just which phenomena count as happiness as opposed to something else, to decide ...
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  4. Matthew King (2008). The Glass Shatters and Ducks Turn Into Rabbits: Bad Faith and Moral Luck. Dialogue 47 (3-4):583-.
    ABSTRACT: This article shows how the "problem of moral luck" and Sartre's concept of "bad faith" are mutually illuminating, since both have to do with confusions about how much we control, or are controlled by, our situations. I agree with three recent proposals that the problem of moral luck results from certain epistemic malfunctions. However, I argue that the problem cannot be dissolved by overcoming these malfunctions because they are rooted in bad faith. Against the currently dominant interpretation, I argue (...)
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  5. Matthew King (2007). Heidegger's Etymological Method: Discovering Being by Recovering the Richness of the Word. Philosophy Today 51 (3):278-289.
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  6. Matthew King (2007). The Meno's Metaphilosophical Examples. Southern Journal of Philosophy 45 (3):395-412.
    I propose that an ill-appreciated contrast between the examples Socrates gives Meno, to show him how he ought to philosophize, is the key to understanding the Meno. I contend that Socrates prefers hisdefinitions of shape to his account of color because the former are concerned with what shape is, while the latter is concerned with how color comes to be. This contrast suggests that Plato intends ananalogous contrast between the (properly philosophical) way of inquiry that leads to Socrates’ definition of (...)
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  7. Matthew King (2003). Charles E. Scott, The Lives of Things Reviewed By. Philosophy in Review 23 (4):284-286.
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  8. Matthew King (2003). Moral Selfhood in the Liberal Tradition. The European Legacy 8 (2):209-212.
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