9 found
Sort by:
Disambiguations:
Matthew MacKenzie [7]Matthew D. MacKenzie [3]
See also:
Profile: Matthew MacKenzie (Colorado State University)
  1. Matthew MacKenzie (forthcoming). Buddhism Naturalized? Review of Owen Flanagan, the Bodhisattva's Brain: Buddhism Naturalized. [REVIEW] Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences:1-4.
  2. Matthew MacKenzie (2013). Enacting Selves, Enacting Worlds: On the Buddhist Theory of Karma. Philosophy East and West 63 (2):194-212.
    The concept of karma is one of the most general and basic for the philosophical traditions of India, one of an interconnected cluster of concepts that form the basic presuppositions of Indian philosophy. And like many general, pervasive, and basic philosophical concepts, the idea of karma exhibits both semantic complexity and a certain fluidity and open texture. That is, the concept may not have a determinate application in all possible cases, it can be fleshed out in quite different ways in (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. Matthew MacKenzie (2010). Enacting the Self: Buddhist and Enactivist Approaches to the Emergence of the Self. [REVIEW] Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 9 (1):75-99.
    In this paper, I take up the problem of the self through bringing together the insights, while correcting some of the shortcomings, of Indo–Tibetan Buddhist and enactivist accounts of the self. I begin with an examination of the Buddhist theory of non-self ( anātman ) and the rigorously reductionist interpretation of this doctrine developed by the Abhidharma school of Buddhism. After discussing some of the fundamental problems for Buddhist reductionism, I turn to the enactive approach to philosophy of mind and (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. Matthew D. MacKenzie, Self-Awareness: Issues in Classical Indian and Contermporary Western Philosophy.
    No categories
    Translate to English
    | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. Matthew MacKenzie (2008). Self-Awareness Without a Self: Buddhism and the Reflexivity of Awareness. Asian Philosophy 18 (3):245 – 266.
    _In this paper, I show that a robust, reflexivist account of self-awareness (such as was defended by Dignamacrga and Dharmakīrti, most phenomenologists, and others) is compatible with reductionist view of persons, and hence with a rejection of the existence of a substantial, separate self. My main focus is on the tension between Buddhist reflexivism and the central Buddhist doctrine of no-self. In the first section of the paper, I give a brief sketch of reflexivist (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  6. Matthew MacKenzie (2008). Ontological Deflationism in Madhyamaka. Contemporary Buddhism 9 (2):197-207.
  7. Matthew MacKenzie (2007). Review of Shyam Ranganathan, Ethics and the History of Indian Philosophy. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2007 (10).
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  8. Matthew D. MacKenzie (2007). The Illumination of Consciousness: Approaches to Self-Awareness in the Indian and Western Traditions. Philosophy East and West 57 (1):40-62.
    : Philosophers in the Indian and Western traditions have developed and defended a range of sophisticated accounts of self-awareness. Here, four of these accounts are examined, and the arguments for them are assessed. Theories of self-awareness developed in the two traditions under consideration fall into two broad categories: reflectionist or other-illumination theories and reflexivist or self-illumination theories. Having assessed the main arguments for these theories, it is argued here that while neither reflectionist nor reflexivist theories are adequate as traditionally formulated (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  9. Matthew D. MacKenzie (2001). The Five Factors of Action and the Decentring of Agency in the Bhagavad Gtā. Asian Philosophy 11 (3):141 – 150.
    I will here analyse the five factors of action given in the Bhagavad Gtā, paying specific attention to the implications of this account for the Gtā's moral and soteriological psychologies. I argue that the Gtā's account of action constitutes a decentring of agency which paves the way for liberation. Further, while the ethics and moral psychology of the Gtā are often seen as similar to Kant's, I will argue that the decentring of agency in the Gtā places the liberated person (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation