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  1. Matthew R. Silliman (2012). Demenchonok, Edward, Ed. Philosophy After Hiroshima. Review of Metaphysics 66 (2):362-364.
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  2. Matthew R. Silliman (2012). Is Terrorism, or War, Ever Justified? Comment on Nathanson's Terrorism and the Ethics of War. Social Philosophy Today 28:177-185.
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  3. Matthew R. Silliman & David Kenneth Johnson (2011). Critical Thinking, Autonomy, and Social Justice. Social Philosophy Today 27:127-138.
    In a fictional conversation designed to appeal to both working teachers and social philosophers, three educators take up the question of whether critical thinking itself can, or should, be taught independently of an explicit consideration of issues related to social justice. One, a thoughtful but somewhat traditional Enlightenment rationalist, sees critical thinking as a neutral set of skills and dispositions, essentially unrelated to the conclusions of morality, problems of social organization, or the content of any particular academic discipline. A second (...)
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  4. Matthew R. Silliman & David Kenneth Johnson (2007). Tortured Ethics. Social Philosophy Today 23:211-222.
    This dialogue discusses a proposal for the legalization of torture under specific circumstances and contrasts it with arguments for a total ban on torture. We consider three types of objection: first, that the difficulty of having adequate knowledge renders the stock “ticking bomb” scenario such a low-probability hypothetical as to present no realistic threat to a policy banning all torture; second, that empirically the information gleaned from torture is so unlikely to be reliable that it could not justify the moral (...)
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  5. Matthew R. Silliman (2006). Sentience and Sensibility: A Conversation About Moral Philosophy. Parmenides Pub..
    Original value -- Value incrementalism -- A normative proposal -- Valuing development -- The many faces of value -- Direct and indirect moral considerability -- Affirming moral theories -- Ethical vegetarianism? -- The possibility of an environmental ethic -- Racism and moral perfectionism -- The bankruptcy of moral relativism.
     
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  6. Matthew R. Silliman (2006). Two Cheers for Reductionism. Social Philosophy Today 22:59-70.
    This imagined conversation between Sir Isaac Newton and the priestess Diotima (from Plato’s Symposium) examines the possible merits of reductionism in scientific inquiry, finding it of value both as a methodology for the simplification of scientific explanations and for the decisive elimination of metaphysically extravagant scientific hypotheses. However, the power and narrative appeal of reductionism renders its overuse a perennial danger. Science thus needs reductionism, but also needs reminding that its task is to explain natural phenomena, not to explain them (...)
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  7. Matthew R. Silliman (2004). Weighing Evils. Social Philosophy Today 20:129-136.
    Even if war, terrorism, and other acts of political violence are inherently wrong, in so radically imperfect a world as our own there remains a need, as Virginia Held suggests, to evaluate such acts so as to distinguish between degrees of their unjustifiability. This essay proposes a notion of deliberative democracy as one criterion for such a comparative evaluation. Expanding on an analysis of the psychologically terrorizing impact of violence borrowed from Hannah Arendt, I suggest that it is principally this (...)
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  8. Matthew R. Silliman (2003). Racism As Personal Vice and Structural Problem. Social Philosophy Today 19:243-248.
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  9. Matthew R. Silliman & David K. Johnson (2000). The Anti-Theorist's Paradox. Social Philosophy Today 15:199-208.
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  10. David K. Johnson & Matthew R. Silliman (1998). Critical Thinking and the Argumentative Essay. Inquiry 17 (4):40-43.
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  11. Matthew R. Silliman (1993). Freedom, Property, and the Rhetoric of Family. Social Philosophy Today 9:171-184.
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