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Profile: Matthew Sharpe (Deakin University)
  1. Matthew Sharpe (forthcoming). How It's Not the Chrisippus You Read in Advance. Philosophy Today.
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  2. Matthew Sharpe (2014). Georgics of the Mind and the Architecture of Fortune: Francis Bacon's Therapeutic Ethics. Philosophical Papers 43 (1):89-121.
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  3. Matthew Sharpe (2014). Stoic Virtue Ethics. In Stan van Hooft & Nafsika Athanassoulis (eds.), The Handbook of Virtue Ethics. Acumen Publishing Ltd..
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  4. Matthew Sharpe (2013). Camus' Askesis : Reading Camus in Light of the Carnets (and His L'Impromptu des Philosophes). Philosophical Practice 8 (1):1149-1164.
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  5. Matthew Sharpe (2013). Restoring Camus as Philosophe. Critical Horizons 13 (3):400 - 424.
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  6. Matthew Sharpe (2012). Changing Aristotle's Mind and World : Critical Notes on McDowell's Aristotle. Philosophy Study 2 (11):804-821.
    Aristotle’s Nicomachean Ethics is central to John McDowell’s classic Mind and World. In Lectures IV and V of that work, McDowell makes three claims concerning Aristotle’s ethics: first, that Aristotle did not base his ethics on an externalist, naturalistic basis (including a theory of human nature); second, that attempts to read him as an ethical naturalist are a modern anachronism, generated by the supposed need to ground all viable philosophical claims on claims analogous to the natural sciences; and third, that (...)
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  7. Matthew Sharpe (2012). Restoring Camus as Philosophe: On Ronald Srigley's Camus' Critique of Modernity. Critical Horizons 13 (3):400-424.
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  8. John Bigelow, Raymond D. Bradley, Andrew Brennan, Tony Coady, Peter Forrest, James Franklin, Karen Green, Russell Grigg, Matthew Sharpe, Jeanette Kennett, Neil Levy, Catriona Mackenzie, Gary Malinas, Chris Mortensen, Robert Nola, Paul Patton, Charles R. Pidgen, Val Plumwood, Graham Priest, Greg Restall, Jack Reynolds, Paul Thom & Michelle Boulous Walker (2011). The Antipodean Philosopher: Public Lectures on Philosophy in Australia and New Zealand. Lexington Books.
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  9. Matthew Sharpe (2011). Hadot, Pierre. In James Fieser & Bradley Dowden (eds.), Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
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  10. Matthew Sharpe (2011). 'In the Court of a Great King': Some Remarks on Leo Strauss' Introduction to the Guide for the Perplexed. Sophia 50 (1):141-158.
    This essay, which will be divided between two SOPHIA editions, proposes to test the consensus in Maimonidean scholarship on the alleged intellectualism of Leo Strauss’ Maimonides by making a close interpretive study of Strauss’ 1963 essay ‘How to Begin to Study the Guide for the Perplexed’. While the importance of this essay, which is Strauss’ last extended piece on the Guide, is established in Maimonidean scholarship, its recognised esotericism has been matched by a dearth of detailed studies of the piece. (...)
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  11. Matthew Sharpe (2011). Pierre Hadot (1922-2010). In James Fieser & Bradley Dowden (eds.), Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy. 1--14.
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  12. Matthew Sharpe (2011). Reading Camus “With,” or After, Levinas. Philosophy Today 55 (1):82-95.
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  13. Matthew Sharpe (2011). The Invincible Summer: On Albert Camus' Philosophical Neoclassicism. Sophia 50 (4):577-592.
    What follows is a work of critical reconstruction of Camus' thought. It aims to answer to the wish Camus expressed in his later notebooks, that he at least be read closely. Specifically, I hope to do three things. In Part I, we will show how Camus' famous philosophy of the absurd represents a systematic scepticism whose closest philosophical predecessor is Descartes' method of doubt, and whose consequence, as in Descartes, is the discovery of a single, orienting certainty, on the basis (...)
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  14. Matthew Sharpe (2010). Toula Nicolocapoulos, The Radical Critique of Liberalism: In Memory of a Vision (Victoria: Re-Press, 2008), 292 Pages, Paperback, Isbn 978-0-9803052-5-8,£ 16.00, Hardback, Isbn 978-0-9803052-8-9,£ 30.00. [REVIEW] Critical Horizons 10 (3):430-435.
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  15. Matthew Sharpe & Geoff Boucher (2010). Zizek's Communism and in Defence of Lost Causes. International Journal of Zizek Studies 4 (2):1-7.
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  16. Matthew Sharpe (2009). “Critchley is Žižek” : In Defence of Critical Political Philosophy. Critical Horizons 10 (2):180-196.
    In an ironically Žižekian manner, this paper argues that Simon Critchley and Slavoj Žižek's apparent political disagreement (ludic reformist versus strident revolutionary) conceal a common set of preconditions and presuppositions. These presuppositions can be summed by the slogan “the forgetting of political philosophy”, which more specifically means the forgetting of the difference between philosophy and political life, and the reflective need to find mediations between the two. Critchley's turn to humour honours the notion that politics is about the realm of (...)
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  17. Matthew Sharpe (2009). Hunting Plato's Agalmata. The European Legacy 14 (5):535-547.
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  18. Matthew Sharpe (2009). Is Neoliberalism a Liberalism, or a Strange Kind of Bird? On Hayek and Our Discontents. Critical Horizons 10 (1):76-98.
    This paper examines the theoretical ideas of Friedrich von Hayek, arguably the key progenitor of the global economic orthodoxy of the past two decades. It assesses Hayek's thought as he presents it: namely as a form of liberalism. Section I argues that Hayek's thought, if liberal, is hostile to participatory democracy. Section II then argues the more radical thesis that neoliberalism is also in truth an illiberal doctrine. Founded not in any social contract doctrine, but a form of constructivism, neoliberal (...)
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  19. Matthew Sharpe (2009). Of Diabolical Evil, and Related Matters : On Slavoj Žižek's Reading of Kant's Practical Philosophy. International Journal of Zizek Studies 3 (3):1-23.
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  20. Matthew Sharpe (2009). Toula Nicolocapoulos, The Radical Critique of Liberalism: In Memory of a Vision. Critical Horizons: A Journal of Philosophy and Social Theory 10 (3):430-435.
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  21. Matthew Sharpe (2008). Kant, or the Crack in the Universal : Slavoj Zizek's Politicising the Transcendental Turn. International Journal of Zizek Studies 2 (2):1-20.
    This paper examines Slavoj Zizek’s reading of Immanuel Kant. Its undergirding argument is that Zizek’s work as a whole- up to and including his politically radical statements, which have become more and more prominent since 1997- is conceivable as a project in the rereading of the Kantian ‘Copernican Revolution’ via Lacanian psychoanalysis. Critics now agree that Zizek’s orienting aim is to write a philosophy of politics, as more recent texts, like The Ticklish Subject make clear. (Kay, 2003; Sharpe, 2004; Dean (...)
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  22. Matthew Sharpe (2007). A Question of Two Truths? Remarks on Parrhesia and the 'Political-Philosophical'difference. Parrhesia 2:89-108.
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  23. Matthew Sharpe (2007). Maistre Avec de Sade: Zizek Contra de Maistre. International Journal of Zizek Studies 1 (4):1-24.
    It is possible to argue that the first world is presently living through a period of radical global reaction against the social democratic consensus of the twentieth century. In this context, the use of Slavoj Zizek's Lacnaian theory of ideology to critique the traditions of thought which inform this reaction becomes a vital task. In this paper, I use Zizek's Lacanian theory of ideology to critically analyse de Maistre's remarkable work: particularly his 'Considerations on France'. Zizek's emphasis on the role (...)
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  24. Matthew Sharpe (2006). The Aesthetics of Ideology, or 'The Critique of Ideological Judgment' in Eagleton and Žižek. Political Theory 34 (1):95 - 120.
    The notions of 'ideology' and 'critique of ideology' have been criticised in many ways. This essay examines the works of two contemporary theorists who defend this theoretical category. Interestingly, both do this through pivotal recourse to categories drawn from modern aesthetic theory, and in particular Kant's third "Critique." In this way, they reanimate a theoretical concern with the intersection of politics and aesthetics that goes as far back as Plato. The essay's conclusion reflects on this "aesthetic turn" in the theory (...)
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  25. Matthew Sharpe (2005). Critique as Technology of the Self. Foucault Studies 2:97-116.
    This inquiry is situated at the intersection of two enigmas. The first is the enigma of the status of Kant's practice of critique, which has been the subject of heated debate since shortly after the publication of the first edition of The Critique of Pure Reason. The second enigma is that of Foucault's apparent later 'turn' to Kant, and the label of 'critique', to describe his own theoretical practice. I argue that Kant's practice of 'critique' should be read, after Foucault, (...)
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  26. Matthew Sharpe, Slavoj Zizek. Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
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  27. Matthew Sharpe (2002). Autonomy, Reflexivity, Tragedy: Notions of Democracy in Camus and Castoriadis. Critical Horizons 3 (1):103-129.
    This paper looks at two 20th century theories of tragedy: those of Cornelius Castoriadis and Albert Camus. The theories that each proffer of this ancient cultural form are striking. Against more standard views, both theorists stress that tragedy is a cultural form that has only arisen historically in cultures whose forms of religious thought have been laid open to question. In this way, both argue that tragedy is an important democratic cultural form, which stages the confrontation between a no longer (...)
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  28. Matthew Sharpe (2002). Do Universals Have a Reference? On the Critical Theory of Herbert Marcuse. Philosophy Today 46 (2):193-208.
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  29. Matthew Sharpe, Jacques Lacan. Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
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  30. Matthew Sharpe (2002). The Descent of the Doves: Camus's Fall, Derrida's Ethics? Philosophy and Social Criticism 28 (2):173-189.
    This essay is a critique of Derrida's ethical works, using Camus's last novella The Fall as a critical sounding board. It argues that a danger pertains to any such highly self-reflexive position as Derrida's: a danger that Camus identified in The Fall, and staged in his character, Jean-Baptiste Clamence. Clamence is a successful Parisian lawyer, on top of his personal and professional life, whose equanimity is troubled after he is the unwitting passer-by as a young woman suicides one night on (...)
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