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Matthew Walker [10]Matthew D. Walker [3]Matthew P. Walker [2]
  1. Matthew Walker (2013). Reconciling the Stoic and the Sceptic: Hume on Philosophy as a Way of Life and the Plurality of Happy Lives. British Journal for the History of Philosophy 21 (5):879 - 901.
    On the one hand, Hume accepts the view ? which he attributes primarily to Stoicism ? that there exists a determinate best and happiest life for human beings, a way of life led by a figure whom Hume calls ?the true philosopher?. On the other hand, Hume accepts that view ? which he attributes to Scepticism ? that there exists a vast plurality of good and happy lives, each potentially equally choiceworthy. In this paper, I reconcile Hume's apparently conflicting commitments: (...)
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  2. Matthew D. Walker (2013). Rehabilitating Theoretical Wisdom. Journal of Moral Philosophy 10 (6):763-787.
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  3. Matthew Walker & Aubrey Kent (2013). The Roles of Credibility and Social Consciousness in the Corporate Philanthropy-Consumer Behavior Relationship. Journal of Business Ethics 116 (2):341-353.
    The attention paid to the influence of organizational philanthropy on consumer responses has precipitated a shift in the role this practice plays in organizational dynamics—with philanthropy becoming an increasingly strategic marketing tool. The authors develop and test a model predicting that: (1) perceived organizational credibility will mediate the relationship between awareness of philanthropy and the outcomes of advocacy and financial sacrifice; (2) consumer social consciousness will moderate the relationship between awareness of philanthropy and firm credibility, and between credibility and the (...)
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  4. Haylee Uecker-Mercado & Matthew Walker (2012). The Value of Environmental Social Responsibility to Facility Managers: Revealing the Perceptions and Motives for Adopting ESR. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 110 (3):269-284.
    This study is grounded in the debate surrounding the perceived value of environmental social responsibility (ESR). Applying the Managerial Theory of the Firm, in-depth interviews were conducted to identify managerial motives, perceptions, and perceived value of ESR. Using sport and public assembly facilities as the research context, environmentally responsible information was obtained from facility managers who were members of the International Association of Venue Managers. In total, 15 one-hour, interviews with key facility personnel demonstrate that (1) internal stakeholder pressure, (2) (...)
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  5. Matthew D. Walker (2012). Kupperman, Joel J., Theories of Human Nature. Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 11 (2):253-257.
  6. Mark D. Groza, Mya R. Pronschinske & Matthew Walker (2011). Perceived Organizational Motives and Consumer Responses to Proactive and Reactive CSR. Journal of Business Ethics 102 (4):639-652.
    Corporate social responsibility (CSR) has emerged as an effective way for firms to create favorable attitudes among consumers. Although prior research has addressed the direct influence of proactive and reactive CSR on consumer responses, this research hypothesized that consumers’ perceived organizational motives (i.e., attributions) will mediate this relationship. It was also hypothesized that the source of information and location of CSR initiative will affect the motives consumers assign to a firms’ engagement in the initiative. Two experiments were conducted to test (...)
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  7. Matthew Walker (2011). Aristotle on Activity “According to the Best and Most Final” Virtue. Apeiron 44 (1):91-109.
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  8. Matthew Walker (2010). The Utility of Contemplation in Aristotle's Protrepticus. Ancient Philosophy 30 (1):135-153.
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  9. Matthew Walker (2010). The Virtue of Aristotle's Ethics (Review). Journal of the History of Philosophy 48 (3):397-398.
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  10. Matthew D. Walker (2010). Contemplation and Self–Awareness in the Nicomachean Ethics. Rhizai. A Journal for Ancient Philosophy and Science:221-238.
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  11. Matthew Walker, Bob Heere, Milena M. Parent & Dan Drane (2010). Social Responsibility and the Olympic Games: The Mediating Role of Consumer Attributions. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 95 (4):659 - 680.
    Current literature suggests that corporate social responsibility (CSR) can affect consumers' attitudes towards an organization and is regarded as a driver for reputation-building and fostering sustained consumer patronage. Although prior research has addressed the direct influence of CSR on consumer responses, this research examined the mediating influence of consumer's perceived organizational motives within an NGO setting.Given the heightened public attention surrounding the 2008 Beijing Olympic Games, data were collected from consumers of the Games to assess their perceptions of the International (...)
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  12. Matthew Walker (2006). When There's No More Room in Hell, the Dead Will Shop the Earth: Romero and Aristotle on Zombies, Happiness, and Consumption. In Richard Greene & K. Silem Mohammed (eds.), The Undead and Philosophy. Open Court. 81--89.
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  13. Matthew P. Walker (2005). A Refined Model of Sleep and the Time Course of Memory Formation. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 28 (1):51-64.
    Research in the neurosciences continues to provide evidence that sleep plays a role in the processes of learning and memory. There is less of a consensus, however, regarding the precise stages of memory development during which sleep is considered a requirement, simply favorable, or not important. This article begins with an overview of recent studies regarding sleep and learning, predominantly in the procedural memory domain, and is measured against our current understanding of the mechanisms that govern memory formation. Based on (...)
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  14. Matthew P. Walker (2005). Past, Present, and the Future: Discussions Surrounding a New Model of Sleep-Dependent Learning and Memory Processing. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 28 (1):87-104.
    Following on from the target article, which presented a new model of procedural skill memory development, in this response I will reflect on issues raised by invited commentators and further expound attributes of the model. Discussion will focus on: evidence against sleep-dependent memory processing, definitions of memory stages and memory systems, and relationships between memory enhancement, sleep-stages, dreaming, circadian time, and sleep-disorders.
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  15. Robert Stickgold & Matthew Walker (2004). To Sleep, Perchance to Gain Creative Insight? Trends in Cognitive Sciences 8 (5):191-192.
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