Search results for 'Matthew William McKeon' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Matthew William McKeon (2009). A Plea for Logical Objects. Synthese 167 (1):163 - 182.score: 290.0
    An account of validity that makes what is invalid conditional on how many individuals there are is what I call a conditional account of validity. Here I defend conditional accounts against a criticism derived from Etchemendy’s well-known criticism of the model-theoretic analysis of validity. The criticism is essentially that knowledge of the size of the universe is non-logical and so by making knowledge of the extension of validity depend on knowledge of how many individuals there are, conditional accounts fail to (...)
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  2. Richard McKeon (1998). Selected Writings of Richard Mckeon. University of Chicago Press.score: 150.0
    Richard McKeon enjoys an enviable reputation as an erudite historian of ideas and exegete of philosophic texts. However, the originality and scope of his achievement as a systematic philosopher are less widely known. In this ambitious three-volume edition, of which Philosophy, Science, and Culture is the first, a selection of McKeon's writings will be collected to showcase his distinctive approach to the analysis of discourse. Volume I covers philosophic theory through his writings on first philosophy (metaphysics) and the (...)
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  3. Richard Peter McKeon (1990). Freedom and History and Other Essays: An Introduction to the Thought of Richard Mckeon. University of Chicago Press.score: 150.0
    This volume of essays is an important introduction to the thought of one of the twentieth century's most significant yet underappreciated philosophers, Richard McKeon. The originator of philosophical pluralism, McKeon made extraordinary contributions to philosophy, to international relations, and to theory-formation in the communication arts, aesthetics, the organization of knowledge, and the practical sciences. This collection, which includes a philosophical autobiography as well as the out-of-print title essay "Freedom and History" and a previously unpublished essay on "Philosophic Semantics (...)
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  4. Matthew McKeon (1996). Logical Truth in Modal Logic. Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 77 (4):351-361.score: 150.0
    In this paper, I consider the criticism due to Hartry Field, John Pollack, William Hanson and James Hawthorne that the Kripkean requirement that a logical truth in modal logic be true at all possible worlds in _all quantified model structures is unmotivated and misses some logical truths. These authors do not see the basis for making the logical truth of a modal sentence turn on more than the model structure given by one reading of the modal operator(s) which occur (...)
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  5. Matthew W. McKeon (2010). The Concept of Logical Consequence: An Introduction to Philosophical Logic. Peter Lang Pub..score: 120.0
    Introduction -- The concept of logical consequence -- Tarski's characterization of the common concept of logical consequence -- The logical consequence relation has a modal element -- The logical consequence relation is formal -- The logical consequence relation is A priori -- Logical and non-logical terminology -- The meanings of logical terms explained in terms of their semantic properties -- The meanings of logical terms explained in terms of their inferential properties -- Model-theoretic and deductive-theoretic conceptions of logic -- Linguistic (...)
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  6. Matthew McKeon, Logical Consequence, Philosophical Considerations. Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy.score: 120.0
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  7. Matthew McKeon, Logical Consequence, Deductive-Theoretic Conceptions. Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy.score: 120.0
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  8. Matthew McKeon (2004). On the Substitutional Characterization of First-Order Logical Truth. History and Philosophy of Logic 25 (3):205-224.score: 120.0
    I consider the well-known criticism of Quine's characterization of first-order logical truth that it expands the class of logical truths beyond what is sanctioned by the model-theoretic account. Briefly, I argue that at best the criticism is shallow and can be answered with slight alterations in Quine's account. At worse the criticism is defective because, in part, it is based on a misrepresentation of Quine. This serves not only to clarify Quine's position, but also to crystallize what is and what (...)
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  9. Matthew Mckeon (1999). Bertrand Russell and Logical Truth. Philosophia 27 (3-4):541-553.score: 120.0
    I expose a tension in Bertrand Russell's, _Introduction to Mathematical Philosophy, between his account of logical truth and his view that logical truth is knowable without taking into account what the world is like. Russell makes the logical truth of a sentence turn on the actual truth of its second-order universal closure. But this results in making logical truth relative to the number of worldly individuals. I aim to use the tension in _Introduction to Mathematical Philosophy to classify the status (...)
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  10. Matthew W. McKeon (2013). On the Rationale for Distinguishing Arguments From Explanations. Argumentation 27 (3):283-303.score: 120.0
    Even with the lack of consensus on the nature of an argument, the thesis that explanations and arguments are distinct is near orthodoxy in well-known critical thinking texts and in the more advanced argumentation literature. In this paper, I reconstruct two rationales for distinguishing arguments from explanations. According to one, arguments and explanations are essentially different things because they have different structures. According to the other, while some explanations and arguments may have the same structure, they are different things because (...)
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  11. Matthew McKeon (2012). Review of" The Tarskian Turn: Deflationism and Axiomatic Truth". [REVIEW] Essays in Philosophy 13 (2):19.score: 120.0
  12. Richard McKeon (1937). Book Review:The Early Philosophers of Greece. Matthew Thompson McClure, Richard Lattimore. [REVIEW] Ethics 47 (3):399-.score: 120.0
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  13. C. McGinn & Matthew McKeon (2003). REVIEWS-Logical Properties: Identity, Existence, Predication, Necessity, Truth. Bulletin of Symbolic Logic 9 (1):39-41.score: 120.0
    Identity, existence, predication, necessity, and truth are fundamental philosophical concerns. Colin McGinn treats them both philosophically and logically, aiming for maximum clarity and minimum pointless formalism. He contends that there are real logical properties that challenge naturalistic metaphysical outlooks. These concepts are not definable, though we can say a good deal about how they work. The aim of Logical Properties is to bring philosophy back to philosophical logic.
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  14. Matthew McKeon (2006). Forall X: An Introduction to Formal Logic, Version 1.11. Teaching Philosophy 4:387-390.score: 120.0
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  15. Matthew McKeon (2006). Forall X. Teaching Philosophy 29 (4):387-390.score: 120.0
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  16. Matthew Mckeon (2004). Logic and Existential Commitment. Logique Et Analyse 47:195-214.score: 120.0
     
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  17. Matthew McKeon (2003). McGinn Colin. Logical Properties: Identity, Existence, Predication, Necessity, Truth. Clarendon Press, Oxford 2000, Vi+ 114 Pp. [REVIEW] Bulletin of Symbolic Logic 9 (1):39-42.score: 120.0
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  18. Matthew McKeon (2004). Review of “Tractatus Logico-Philosophicus”. [REVIEW] Essays in Philosophy 5 (2):24.score: 120.0
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  19. C. William (1976). William C. Wimsatt. In G. Gordon, Grover Maxwell & I. Savodnik (eds.), Consciousness and the Brain: A Scientific and Philosophical Inquiry. Plenum. 205.score: 120.0
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  20. Glenn Branch (2009). Review of William Paley, Natural Theology , Edited with an Introduction and Notes by Matthew D. Eddy and David Knight. [REVIEW] Sophia 48 (1):99-101.score: 72.0
    Matthew D. Eddy and David Knight’s new edition of William Paley’s Natural Theology deserves to become the standard scholarly edition of what is a historically, theologically, and philosophically important work, despite a certain neglect of philosophical issues on the part of the editors.
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  21. Edgar Hill Duncan (1960). Book Review:The Ethical Idealism of Matthew Arnold: A Study of the Nature and Sources of His Moral and Religious Ideas. William Robbins. [REVIEW] Ethics 71 (1):60-.score: 36.0
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  22. J. Mitscherling (2002). Selected Writings of Richard McKeon, Vol. 1: Philosophy, Science, and Culture. Edited by Zahava K. McKeon and William G. Swenson. [REVIEW] The European Legacy 7 (1):130-130.score: 36.0
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  23. Robert M. Stein (2013). Jocelyn Wogan-Browne and Thelma S. Fenster, Transs., “The Life of Saint Alban” by Matthew Paris. With “The Passion of Saint Alban,” by William of St. Albans, Trans. Thomas O'Donnell and Margaret Lamont, and “Studies of the Manuscript” by Christopher Baswell and Patricia Quinn. (Medieval and Renaissance Texts and Studies 342; The French of England Translation Series 2.) Tempe: Arizona Center for Medieval and Renaissance Studies, 2010. Pp. Xvi, 224 Plus Color Figures and Plates; Black-and-White Figures. $45. ISBN: 9780866983907.Tony Hunt, Ed., and Jane Bliss, Trans., “Cher Alme”: Texts of Anglo-Norman Piety. Introduction by Henrietta Leyser. (Medieval and Renaissance Texts and Studies 385; The French of England Translation Series, Occasional Publication Series, 1.) Tempe: Arizona Center for Medieval and Renaissance Studies, 2010. Pp. Xii, 445. $60. ISBN: 9780866984331. [REVIEW] Speculum 88 (4):1188-1191.score: 36.0
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  24. Jaime Nubiola (2000). Ludwig Wittgenstein and William James. Streams of William James 2 (3):2-4.score: 21.0
    The relationship between William James and Ludwig Wittgenstein (1889-1951) has recently been the subject of intense scholarly research. We know for instance that the later Wittgenstein's reflections on the philosophy of psychology found in James a major source of inspiration. Not surprisingly therefore, the pragmatist nature of the philosophy of the later Wittgenstein is increasingly acknowledged, in spite of Wittgenstein’s adamant refusal of being labeled a “pragmatist”. In this brief paper I merely want to piece together some of the (...)
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  25. Matthew Ratcliffe (2005). William James on Emotion and Intentionality. International Journal of Philosophical Studies 13 (2):179-202.score: 21.0
    William James's theory of emotion is often criticized for placing too much emphasis on bodily feelings and neglecting the cognitive aspects of emotion. This paper suggests that such criticisms are misplaced. Interpreting James's account of emotion in the light of his later philosophical writings, I argue that James does not emphasize bodily feelings at the expense of cognition. Rather, his view is that bodily feelings are part of the structure of intentionality. In reconceptualizing the relationship between cognition and affect, (...)
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  26. Jaime Nubiola (2001). William James and Borges Again: The Riddle of the Correspondence with Macedonio Fernández. Streams of William James 3 (2):10-11.score: 21.0
    In this short paper I try to present William James’s connection with the Argentinian writer Macedonio Fernández (1874-1952), who was in some sense a mentor of Borges and might be considered the missing link between Borges and James.
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  27. Jaime Nubiola (1999). Jorge Luis Borges and William James. Streams of William James 1 (3):7.score: 21.0
    The year of the centennial of the Argentinean writer Jorge Luis Borges is probably the right time to exhume one of the links that this universal writer had with William James. In 1945, Emece, a publisher from Buenos Aires, printed a Spanish translation of William James’s book Pragmatism, with a foreword by Jorge Luis Borges.
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  28. G. William Barnard (2005). Pt. 3. James and Mysticism. For an Engaged Reading : William James and the Varieties of Postmodern Religious Experience / Grace M. Jantzen ; Asian Religions and Mysticism : The Legacy of William James in the Study of Religions / Richard King ; James and Freud on Mysticism / Robert A. Segal ; Mystical Assessments : Jamesian Reflections on Spiritual Judgments. [REVIEW] In Jeremy R. Carrette (ed.), William James and the Varieties of Religious Experience: A Centenary Celebration. Routledge.score: 21.0
  29. Ruth Anna Putnam (ed.) (1997). The Cambridge Companion to William James. Cambridge University Press.score: 21.0
    William James (1842-1910) was both a philosopher and a psychologist, nowadays most closely associated with the pragmatic theory of truth. The essays in this Companion deal with the full range of his thought as well as other issues, including technical philosophical issues, religious speculation, moral philosophy and political controversies of his time. The relationship between James and other philosophers of his time, as well as his brother Henry, are also examined. By placing James in his intellectual landscape the volume (...)
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  30. Bertrand Russell (1992). William James's Conception of Truth. In William James & Doris Olin (eds.), William James: Pragmatism, in Focus. Routledge.score: 18.0
    The original 1907 text of James' Pragmatism is accompanied with a series of critical essays from scholars including Moore and Russell. In the introduction Olin evaluates the strength of the criticisms made against James.
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  31. H. G. Callaway (ed.) (2008). William James, A Pluralistic Universe: A New Philosophical Reading. Cambridge Scholars.score: 18.0
    This book is my new scholarly edition of William James, A Pluralistic Universe. The original text has been recovered, annotations to the text added to identify James' authors and events of interest, there is a new bibliography chiefly based on James' sources, a brief chronology of James' career, and I have added an expository and critical Introduction and a comprehensive analytical index.
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  32. Alexander Klein (2008). Divide Et Impera! William James's Pragmatist Tradition in the Philosophy of Science. Philosophical Topics 36 (1):129-166.score: 18.0
    ABSTRACT. May scientists rely on substantive, a priori presuppositions? Quinean naturalists say "no," but Michael Friedman and others claim that such a view cannot be squared with the actual history of science. To make his case, Friedman offers Newton's universal law of gravitation and Einstein's theory of relativity as examples of admired theories that both employ presuppositions (usually of a mathematical nature), presuppositions that do not face empirical evidence directly. In fact, Friedman claims that the use of such presuppositions is (...)
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  33. Jaime Nubiola (2009). Review of H.G. Callaway (Ed), William James, A Pluralistic Universe. [REVIEW] Anuario Filosófico 42 (1):222-223.score: 18.0
    As suggested in the subtitle, A New Philosophical Reading, the editor aspires in his Introduction and his notes to “facilitate a deeper understanding and a critical evaluation (...) of this crucial and difficult philosophical work” (p. ix). This was the last important book which James published during his lifetime. With it James aims at a critical evaluation of Hegelian monism and an exploration of the philosophical and theological alternatives. “Our world of some one hundred years on”—the editor says (p. ix)—“is (...)
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  34. Richard A. S. Hall (2009). Review of H.G. Callaway Ed, William James, A Pluralistic Universe, A New Philosophical Reading. [REVIEW] The Pluralist 4 (3).score: 18.0
    In 1907 William James was invited to give the Hibbert Lectures at Manchester College, Oxford. Initially he was reluctant to do so since he feared undertaking them would divert him from developing rigorously and systematically some metaphysical ideas of his own that had preoccupied him for some time. In the end, however, he relented and in the spring of 1908 gave the lectures which were subsequently published as A Pluralistic Universe. As it happened, though, in the course of these (...)
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  35. Sami Pihlström (2009). The Conduct of Life: A Philosophical Reading, Ralph Waldo Emerson By H.G. Callaway (Ed.) Society and Solitude: Twelve Chapters. A New Study Edition, with Notes, Philosophical Commentary and Historical Contextualization, Ralph Waldo Emerson By H.G. Callaway (Ed.) A Pluralistic Universe: Hibbert Lectures at Manchester College on the Present Situation in Philosophy. A New Philosophical Reading, William James By H.G. Callaway (Ed.). [REVIEW] Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 45 (3):444-449.score: 18.0
    This new edition of William James’s 1909 classic, A Pluralistic Universe reproduces the original text, only modernizing the spelling. The books has been annotated throughout to clarify James’s points of reference and discussion. There is a new, fuller index, a brief chronology of James’s life, and a new bibliography—chiefly based on James’s own references. The editor, H.G. Callaway, has included a new Introduction which elucidates the legacy of Jamesian pluralism to survey some related questions of contemporary American society. -/- (...)
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  36. Jennifer Welchman (2006). William James's "the Will to Believe" and the Ethics of Self-Experimentation. Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 42 (2):229-241.score: 18.0
    : William James's "The Will to Believe" has been criticized for offering untenable arguments in support of belief in unvalidated hypotheses. Although James is no longer accused of suggesting we can create belief ex nihilo, critics continue to charge that James's defense of belief in what he called the "religious hypothesis" confuses belief with hypothesis adoption and endorses willful persistence in unvalidated beliefs—not, as he claimed, in pursuit of truth, but merely to avoid the emotional stress of abandoning them. (...)
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  37. Jeff Jordan (2009). Review of William L. Rowe on Philosophy of Religion: Selected Writings , Edited by Nick Trakakis. [REVIEW] Sophia 48 (4):495-496.score: 18.0
    William L. Rowe on Philosophy of Religion’ edited by Nick Trakakis, collects 30 papers of William Rowe's important work in the philosophy of religion. I review this collection, and offer an objection of one of Rowe's arguments.
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  38. Thomas J. J. Altizer (2009). The Revolutionary Vision of William Blake. Journal of Religious Ethics 37 (1):33-38.score: 18.0
    It was William Blake's insight that the Christian churches, by inverting the Incarnation and the dialectical vision of Paul, have repressed the body, divided God from creation, substituted judgment for grace, and repudiated imagination, compassion, and the original apocalyptic faith of early Christianity. Blake's prophetic poetry thus contributes to the renewal of Christian ethics by a process of subversion and negation of Christian moral, ecclesiastical, and theological traditions, which are recognized precisely as inversions of Jesus, and therefore as instances (...)
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  39. Roberto Festa (2012). “For Unto Every One That Hath Shall Be Given”. Matthew Properties for Incremental Confirmation. Synthese 184 (1):89-100.score: 18.0
    Confirmation of a hypothesis by evidence can be measured by one of the so far known incremental measures of confirmation. As we show, incremental measures can be formally defined as the measures of confirmation satisfying a certain small set of basic conditions. Moreover, several kinds of incremental measure may be characterized on the basis of appropriate structural properties. In particular, we focus on the so-called Matthew properties: we introduce a family of six Matthew properties including the reverse (...) effect; we further prove that incremental measures endowed with reverse Matthew effect are possible; finally, we shortly consider the problem of the plausibility of Matthew properties. (shrink)
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  40. Graham Bird (2002). Review: The Divided Self of William James. [REVIEW] Mind 111 (441):100-103.score: 18.0
    This is a review of Richard Gale's 1999 book, The Divided Self of William James (Cambridge U.P.).
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  41. Russell B. Goodman (2002). Wittgenstein and William James. Cambridge University Press.score: 18.0
    This book explores Wittgenstein's long engagement with the work of the pragmatist William James. In contrast to previous discussions Russell Goodman argues that James exerted a distinctive and pervasive positive influence on Wittgenstein's thought. For example, the book shows that the two philosophers share commitments to anti-foundationalism, to the description of the concrete details of human experience, to the priority of practice over intellect, and to the importance of religion in understanding human life. Considering in detail what Wittgenstein learnt (...)
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  42. Jean Suplizio (2007). On the Significance of William James to a Contemporary Doctrine of Evolutionary Psychology. Human Studies 30 (4):357 - 375.score: 18.0
    Academic popularizers of the new field of evolutionary psychology make notable appeals to William James to bolster their doctrine. In particular, they cite James’ remark that humans have all the “impulses” animals do and many more besides to shore up their claim that people’s “instincts” account for their flexibility. This essay argues that these scholars misinterpret James on the instincts. Consciousness (which they find inscrutable) explains cognitive flexibility for James. The evolutionary psychologists’ appeal to James is, therefore, unwarranted and, (...)
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  43. Jack Barbalet (2004). Hypothesis, Faith, and Commitment: William James' Critique of Science. Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 34 (3):213–230.score: 18.0
    William James is remembered as the philosopher of pragmatism, but he was principally the founder of modern scientific psychology. During the period of his most intense scientific involvement James developed a trenchant critique of science. This was not a rejection of science but an attempt to identify limitations of the contemporary conceptualization of science. In particular, James emphasized the failure of science to understand its basis in human emotions. James developed a scientific theory of emotions in which the importance (...)
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  44. John Dewey (1910). William James. Journal of Philosophy, Psychology and Scientific Methods 7 (19):505-508.score: 18.0
    This article by John Dewey is an early appreciation of William James, written at the time of James' death. Dewey would write much more on James in later years.
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  45. Paul Jerome Croce (2007). Mankind's Own Providence: From Swedenborgian Philosophy of Use to William James's Pragmatism. Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 43 (3):490 - 508.score: 18.0
    : It is part of the conventional wisdom about the James family that the elder Henry James (1811–82) had a large influence on his son, William James (1842–1910), in the direction of religious interests. But William neither adopted his father's spirituality nor did he regard it as a foil to his own secularity. Instead, after first rejecting the elder James's idiosyncratic faith, he became increasingly intrigued with his insights into the natural world, which were in turn shaped by (...)
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  46. Sergio Franzese (2008). The Ethics of Energy: William James's Moral Philosophy in Focus. Ontos.score: 18.0
    William James offers an ethical view consistently arising out of valorization of energy of his days, and effecting a counter-tendency to the two great popular ...
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  47. David Baggett (2000). On a Reductionist Analysis of William James's Philosophy of Religion. Journal of Religious Ethics 28 (3):423 - 448.score: 18.0
    William James undertook to steer his way between a rationalistic system that was not empirical enough and an empirical system so materialistic that it could not account for the value commitments on which it rested. In arguing against both the absolutists (gnostics) and the empiricists (agnostics), he defined a position of pluralistic moralism that seemed equally distant from both, leaving himself vulnerable to the criticism that he had rescued morality from scientism only by reducing religion to morals. Such criticism, (...)
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  48. James Rowland Angell (1908). Book Review: Pragmatism: A New Name for Some Old Ways of Thinking. William James. [REVIEW] Ethics 18 (2):226-.score: 18.0
    An early review of William James' Pragmatism, which views pragmatism as primarily methodological.
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  49. Max Carl Otto (ed.) (1942). William James. Madison, the University of Wisconsin Press.score: 18.0
    William James and Wisconsin, by G.C. Sellery.--The distinctive philosophy of William James, by M.C. Otto.--William James, man and philosopher, by D.S. Miller.--William James and psychoanalysis, by Norman Cameron.--The William James centenary dinner: Introductory remarks, by C.A. Dykstra. William James and the world today, by John Dewey, read by Carl Boegholt. William James in the American tradition, by B.H. Bode.--The Sunday service: William James as religious thinker, by J.S. Bixler.
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  50. Graham Bird (1986). William James. Routledge & Kegan Paul.score: 18.0
    Introduction William James was born in New York on January 1842, the first son of Mary and Henry James. His grandfather, also called William, had amassed a ...
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