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Matthias Fritsch [19]Matthias J. Fritsch [1]
  1. Matthias Fritsch (2012). Affirmation and Negativity in Spinoza: A Response to Hasana Sharp. Phaenex 7 (2):229-238.
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  2. Matthias Fritsch (2012). Derrida on the Death Penalty. Southern Journal of Philosophy 50 (s1):56-73.
    Responding to Derrida's Death Penalty Seminar of 1999–2000 and its interpretation by Michael Naas, in this paper I argue that Derrida's deconstruction of the theologico-political concept of the sovereign right over life and death in view of abolishing capital punishment should be understood in terms of the unconditional renunciation of sovereignty that dominates Derrida's later political writings, Rogues (2005) in particular. My reading takes seriously what I call the functional need for a “theological” moment in sovereignty beyond a merely historicist (...)
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  3. Matthias Fritsch (2012). Symposia on Gender, Race and Philosophy. Philosophy 8 (1).
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  4. Matthias Fritsch (2011). Democracy And. The Proceedings of the Twenty-First World Congress of Philosophy 2:137-144.
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  5. Matthias Fritsch (2011). Deconstructive Aporias: Quasi-Transcendental and Normative. Continental Philosophy Review 44 (4):439-468.
    This paper argues that Derrida’s aporetic conclusions regarding moral and political concepts, from hospitality to democracy, can only be understood and accepted if the notion of différance and similar infrastructures are taken into account. This is because it is the infrastructures that expose and commit moral and political practices to a double and conflictual (thus aporetic) future: the conditional future that projects horizonal limits and conditions upon the relation to others, and the unconditional future without horizons of anticipation. The argument (...)
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  6. Matthias Fritsch (2011). Taking Turns: Democracy to Come and Intergenerational Justice. Derrida Today 4 (2):148-172.
    In the face of the ever-growing effect the actions of the present may have upon future people, most conspicuously around climate change, democracy has been accused, with good justification, of a presentist bias: of systemically favouring the presently living. By contrast, this paper will argue that the intimate relation, both quasi-ontological and normative, that Derrida's work establishes between temporality and justice insists upon another, more future-regarding aspect of democracy. We can get at this aspect by arguing for two consequences of (...)
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  7. Matthias Fritsch (2010). Equality and Singularity in Justification and Application Discourses. European Journal of Political Theory 9 (3):328-346.
    To respond to the charge of context-insensitivity, discourse ethics distinguishes justification discourses, which only require that we consider what is equally good for all, and subsequent application discourses, in which the perspective of concrete others must be adopted. This article argues that, despite its pragmatic attractiveness, the separation of justification and application neglects the co-constitutive role that applicability plays for the meaning of normativity. Norms that do not, in a machine-like fashion, produce their cases, cannot already contain their appropriateness to (...)
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  8. Cristian Ciocan, John Russon, Charles E. Scott, Miguel de Beistegui, Matthias Fritsch, Peg Birmingham, Bernard Flynn, Dennis J. Schmidt, Robert J. Dostal & François Raffoul (2008). Renaud Barbaras. Life, Movement, and Desire 3 Alison Ross.'Art'in Nancy's 'First Philosophy': The Artwork and the Praxis of Sense Making 18 Alia Al-Saji.“A Past Which Has Never Been Present”: Bergsonian Dimensions in Merleau-Ponty's Theory of the Prepersonal 41. [REVIEW] Research in Phenomenology 38:455-456.
     
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  9. Matthias Fritsch (2008). Antagonism and Democratic Citizenship (Schmitt, Mouffe, Derrida). Research in Phenomenology 38 (2):174-197.
    In the context of the recent proliferation of nationalisms and enemy figures, this paper agrees with the desirability of retaining some of the explanatory and motivational potential of an agonistic account of politics, but gives reasons not to accept too much of Carl Schmitt's account of citizenship. The claim as to the necessarily antagonistic exclusion of concrete others can be supported neither on its own terms nor on Derridian grounds, as Chantal Mouffe, in particular, attempts to do. I then indicate (...)
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  10. Matthias Fritsch (2008). Deconstructing Ought Implies Can. Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 10:109-115.
    The present paper aims to view three ways of thinking time by Emmanuel Levinas. We distinguish existential, historical, and eschatological time demonstrating how they are connected with his central notion of responsibility toward the Other. The following analysis reorders and interprets what Levinas has said in response of Martin Heidegger’s and Hegel’s position. The text does not make any other claims but aims to offer a possible reading and exegesis of Levinas’s philosophy and open a further discussion on these topics.
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  11. Charles E. Scott, Miguel de Beistegui, Matthias Fritsch, Peg Birmingham, Bernard Flynn & Dennis J. Schmidt (2008). Topic: Democracy and the Idea of Citizenship. Research in Phenomenology 38 (2).
     
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  12. Michel Seymour & Matthias J. Fritsch (eds.) (2007). Reason & Emancipation: Essays on the Philosophy of Kai Nielsen. Humanity Books.
    Religion -- Metaphilosophy -- Marxism -- Global justice -- Nationalism.
     
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  13. Matthias Fritsch (2006). Democracy and "Globalization". The Proceedings of the Twenty-First World Congress of Philosophy 2:137-144.
    One of the major political problems the world faces at the moment of its so-called globalization concerns the possibilities of maintaining, transforming, and expanding democracy. Globalization, as the extension of neo-liberal markets, the formation of multi-national, non-democratic economic powers, and the ubiquitous use of teletechnologies, threatens the modus vivendi of older democracies in ways that call for the reinvention of an old idea. Inasmuch as teletechnical globalization transforms space and time so as to put into question their very presence, and (...)
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  14. Matthias Fritsch (2006). Equal Consideration of All – an Aporetic Project? Philosophy and Social Criticism 32 (3):299-323.
    The article considers the relationships among three arguments that purport to establish the intrinsically contradictory or paradoxical nature of the modern project aiming at the equal consideration of all. The claim that the inevitable historical insertion of universal-egalitarian norms leads to always particular and untransparent interpretations of grammatically universal norms may be combined with the claim that the logic of determination of political communities tends to generate exclusions. The combination of these two claims lends specific force to the third argument (...)
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  15. Matthias Fritsch & Michel Seymour (eds.) (2006). Reason & Emancipation: Essays on the Philosophy of Kai Nielsen. Prometheus Books.
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  16. Matthias Fritsch (2005). A New Critical Theory Based on Rational Choice? Dialogue 44 (2):351-362.
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  17. Matthias Fritsch (2005). Review of Alex Thomson, Deconstruction and Democracy. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2005 (12).
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  18. Matthias Fritsch (2005). The Promise of Memory: History and Politics in Marx, Benjamin, and Derrida. State University of New York Press.
    Argues for a closer connection between memories of injustice and promises of justice as a means to overcome violence.
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  19. Matthias Fritsch (2002). Derrida's Democracy to Come. Constellations 9 (4):574-597.
  20. Matthias Fritsch (2002). The Enlightenment Promise and its Remains: Derrida and Benjamin on the Classless Society. [REVIEW] Human Studies 25 (3):289-296.