1. Matthias M. Graf, Sebastian C. Schuh, Niels Quaquebeke & Rolf Dick (2012). The Relationship Between Leaders' Group-Oriented Values and Follower Identification with and Endorsement of Leaders: The Moderating Role of Leaders' Group Membership. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 106 (3):301-311.
    In this article, we hypothesize that leaders who display group-oriented values (i.e., values that focus on the welfare of the group rather than on the self-interest of the leader) will be evaluated more positively by their followers than leaders who do not display group-oriented values. Importantly, we expected these effects to be more pronounced for leaders who are ingroup members (i.e., stemming from the same social group as their followers) than for leaders who are outgroup members (i.e., leaders stemming from (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. Matthias M. Graf, Sebastian C. Schuh, Niels Van Quaquebeke & Rolf van Dick (2012). The Relationship Between Leaders' Group-Oriented Values and Follower Identification with and Endorsement of Leaders: The Moderating Role of Leaders' Group Membership. Journal of Business Ethics 106 (3):301-311.
    In this article, we hypothesize that leaders who display group-oriented values (i.e., values that focus on the welfare of the group rather than on the self-interest of the leader) will be evaluated more positively by their followers than leaders who do not display group-oriented values. Importantly, we expected these effects to be more pronounced for leaders who are ingroup members (i.e., stemming from the same social group as their followers) than for leaders who are outgroup members (i.e., leaders stemming from (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. Matthias M. Graf, Niels van Quaquebeke & Rolf van Dick (2011). Two Independent Value Orientations: Ideal and Counter-Ideal Leader Values and Their Impact on Followers' Respect for and Identification with Their Leaders. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 104 (2):185-195.
    Traditionally, conceptualizations of human values are based on the assumption that individuals possess a single integrated value system comprising those values that people are attracted by and strive for. Recently, however, van Quaquebeke et al. (in J Bus Ethics 93:293–305, 2010 ) proposed that a value system might consist of two largely independent value orientations—an orientation of ideal values and an orientation of counter-ideal values (values that individuals are repelled by), and that both orientations exhibit antithetic effects on people’s responses (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation