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  1. Matti Häyry & Simo Vehmas (forthcoming). Disability as a Test of Justice in a Globalising World. Journal of Global Ethics:1-9.
    This paper shows how most modern theories of justice could require or at least condone international aid aimed at alleviating the ill effects of disability. Seen from the general viewpoint of liberal egalitarianism, this is moderately encouraging, since according to the creed people in bad positions should be aided, and disability tends to put people in such positions. The actual responses of many theories, including John Rawls's famous view of justice, remain, however, unclear. Communitarian, liberal egalitarian, and luck egalitarian thinkers (...)
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  2. Matti Häyry (2015). What Exactly Did You Claim? Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 24 (1):107-112.
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  3. Matti Häyry (2014). Academic Freedom, Public Reactions, and Anonymity. Bioethics 28 (4):170-173.
    Academic freedom can be defined as immunity against adverse reactions from the general public, designed to keep scholars unintimidated and productive even after they have published controversial ideas. Francesca Minerva claims that this notion of strict instrumental academic freedom is supported by Ronald Dworkin, and that anonymity would effectively defend the sphere of immunity implied by it. Against this, I argue that the idea defended by Minerva finds no support in the work by Dworkin referred to; that anonymity would not (...)
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  4. Matti Häyry (2014). Some Additional Thoughts on Considerable Life Extension and the Meaning of Life. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 23 (1):68-72.
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  5. Tuija Takala & Matti HÄyry (2014). Neuroethics and Animals: Methods and Philosophy. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 23 (2):182-187.
    This article provides an overview of the six other contributions in the Neuroethics and Animals special section. In addition, it discusses the methodological and theoretical problems of interdisciplinary fields. The article suggests that interdisciplinary approaches without established methodological and theoretical bases are difficult to assess scientifically. This might cause these fields to expand without actually advancing.
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  6. Tuija Takala, Matti HÄyry & Laurence Laing (2014). Playing God: The Rock Opera That Endeavors to Become a Bioethics Education Tool. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 23 (2):188-199.
    This article describes and introduces a new innovative tool for bioethics education: a rock opera on the ethics of genetics written by two academics and a drummer legend. The origin of the idea, the characters and their development, and the themes and approaches as well as initial responses to the music and the show are described, and the various educational usages are explored.
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  7. Matti Hayry (2012). Protecting Humanity Habermas and His Critics on the Ethics of Emerging Biotechnologies. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 21 (2):211-222.
    In this article, I present what I believe to be the core of Jürgen Habermas’s views on the morality, ethics, and regulation of emerging genetic and reproductive technologies in his book The Future of Human Nature.
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  8. Matti Häyry (2012). Protecting Humanity. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 21 (02):211-222.
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  9. Matti Häyry (2012). Passive Obedience and Berkeley’s Moral Philosophy. Berkeley Studies 23:3-14.
    In Passive Obedience Berkeley argues that we must always observe the prohibitions decreed by our sovereign rulers. He defends this thesis both by providing critiques against opposing views and, more interestingly, by presenting a moral theory that supports it. The theory contains elements of divine - command, natural - law, moral - sense, rule - based, and outcome - oriented ethics. Ultimately, however, it seems to rest on a notion of spiritual reason — a specific God - given faculty that (...)
     
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  10. Matti Häyry (2011). Considerable Life Extension and Three Views on the Meaning of Life. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 20 (1):21-29.
    Picture this. You are having your regular medical checkup, when, all of a sudden, the physician turns to you and says: “Oh, did I remember to mention that you can now live forever?” You look at the doctor enquiringly and she goes on: “Well, it’s not actual immortality, you know, but they’ve invented this treatment—I don’t have the full details—that stops aging, getting physically older. It might not be for everyone, but you seem to be a suitable candidate. You could (...)
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  11. Matti Häyry (2011). Rationality and the Genetic Challenge Revisited. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 20 (3):468-483.
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  12. Matti Häyry (ed.) (2010). Arguments and Analysis in Bioethics. Rodopi.
    The twenty-one chapters in this volume strive, through the use of high quality argument and analysis, to get a good deal clearer concerning a range of issues ...
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  13. Matti Häyry (2010). An Analysis of Some Arguments for and Against Human Reproduction. In , Arguments and Analysis in Bioethics. Rodopi.
     
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  14. Matti Häyry (2010). Neuroethical Theories. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 19 (02):165-.
    Neuroethics addresses moral, legal, and social questions created or highlighted by theoretical and practical developments in neuroscience. Practices in need of scrutiny currently include at least brain imaging with new techniques, chemical attempts to shift exceptional brain function toward normality, chemical attempts to enhance ordinary brain function beyond normality, and brain manipulation by other methods.Matti H ja paha (Kuopio: UNIpress, 2009).
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  15. Matti Häyry (2010). Rationality and the Genetic Challenge: Making People Better? Cambridge University Press.
    Machine generated contents note: 1. Seven ways of making people better; 2. Rational approaches to the genetic challenge; 3. The best babies and parental responsibility; 4. Deaf embryos, morality, and the law; 5. Saviour siblings and treating people as a means; 6. Reproductive cloning and designing human beings; 7. Embryonic stem cells, vulnerability, and sanctity; 8. Gene therapies, hopes, and fears; 9. Considerable life extension and the meaning of life; 10. Taking the genetic challenge rationally.
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  16. Matti Häyry (2009). Presidential Address: The Ethics of Recognition, Responsibility, and Respect. Bioethics 23 (9):483-485.
    Ethics can be understood as a code of behaviour or as the study of codes of behaviour. While the mission of the International Association of Bioethics is a scholarly examination of moral issues in health care and the biological sciences, many people in the field believe that it is also their task to create new and better codes of practice. Both ways of doing bioethics are sound, but it is important to be aware of the distinction. In this paper, I (...)
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  17. Kathryn E. Artnak, Erika Blacksher, Michael C. Brannigan, Matti Häyry, Insoo Hyun, Kenneth V. Iserson, Patricia A. Marshall, Maghboeba Mosavel & India J. Ornelas (2008). Bette Anton, MLS, is Head Librarian for the Pamela & Kenneth Fong Optometry & Health Sciences Library of the University of California, Berkeley. This Library Serves the UC Berkeley School of Optometry and the UC Berkeley–UC San Francisco Joint Medical Program. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 17:137-138.
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  18. Alister Browne, Quentin Eichbaum, Stefan Eriksson, Colin Farrelly, Joel Frader, Matti Häyry & Gert Helgesson (2008). Y. Michael Barilan, MD, is a Physician in the Department of Internal Medicine at Meir Hospital, Tel Aviv, Israel. Michael Boylan, Ph. D., is Professor in the Department of Philosophy, Mary-Mount University, Arlington, Virginia. [REVIEW] Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 17:1-3.
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  19. Matti Häyry (2008). The Historical Idea of a Better Race. Studies in Ethics, Law, and Technology 2 (1).
    This paper explores the historical idea of improving humanity. Developments in genetics and political thought have during the last century contributed to eugenic policies which have sometimes had adverse effects on people's lives. But European philosophy has seen attempts to make better human beings long before the current scientific advances. The paper explores these attempts by an examination of the doctrines of Plato, Aristotle, Condorcet, Herder, and Mill, as well as the technological Romanticism of Mary Shelley, before moving on to (...)
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  20. Keith A. Bauer, Courtney S. Campbell, Lauren A. Clark, Paul J. Ford, Sven Ove Hansson, Matti Häyry, Sarah Hayward, Peter Herissone-Kelly & Micah Hester (2007). Bette Anton, MLS, is Head Librarian for the Pamela & Kenneth Fong Optometry & Health Sciences Library of the University of California, Berkeley. This Library Serves the UC Berkeley School of Optometry and the UC Berkeley–UC San Francisco Joint Medical Program. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 16:251-253.
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  21. Matti Häyry (2007). Generous Funding for Interventive Aging Research Now? Studies in Ethics, Law, and Technology 1 (1).
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  22. Matti Häyry (2007). The Tension Between Self-Governance and Absolute Inner Worth in Kant's Moral Philosophy. The Proceedings of the Twenty-First World Congress of Philosophy 1 (11):153-157.
    In contemporary discussions on practical ethics, the concepts of autonomy and dignity have frequently been opposed. This tendency has been particularly visible in controversies regarding cloning, abortion, organ sales, and euthanasia. Freedom of research and freedom of choice, as instances of professional and personal autonomy, have been cited in arguments favouring these practices, while the dignity and sanctity of human life have been evoked in arguments against them. In the moral theory of Immanuel Kant, however, the concepts of autonomy and (...)
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  23. Tuija Takala & Matti Häyry (2007). Benefiting From Past Wrongdoing, Human Embryonic Stem Cell Lines, and the Fragility of the German Legal Position. Bioethics 21 (3):150–159.
    This paper examines the logic and morality of the German Stem Cell Act of 2002. After a brief description of the law’s scope and intent, its ethical dimensions are analysed in terms of symbolic threats, indirect consequences, and the encouragement of immorality. The conclusions are twofold. For those who want to accept the law, the arguments for its rationality and morality can be sound. For others, the emphasis on the uniqueness of the German experience, the combination of absolute and qualified (...)
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  24. Keith A. Bauer, Marcus Conant, Evan G. DeRenzo, Neil Graham, Matti Häyry, Steve Heilig, Micah Hester & Søren Holm (2006). Bette Anton, MLS, is Head Librarian for the Pamela & Kenneth Fong Optometry & Health Sciences Library of the University of California, Berkeley. This Library Serves the UC Berkeley School of Optometry and the UC Berkeley–UC San Francisco Joint Medical Program. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 15:117-119.
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  25. Matti Häyry, Jukka Takala, Piia Jallinoja, Salla Lötjönen & Tuija Takala (2006). Ethicalization in Bioscience—A Pilot Study in Finland. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 15 (03):282-284.
    Concepts that refer to trends like globalization and medicalization have, of late, become a hallmark of public debates. The logic of such concepts is that the same word can refer both to good and bad developments, partly depending on the chosen viewpoint. Hardly anyone opposes the global enforcement of human rights, but the global liberation of trade is sometimes viewed with suspicion. In a similar vein, advances in medicine are seldom seen as a bad thing, but medical solutions to social (...)
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  26. M. L. S. Bette Anton, Vilhjálmur Árnason, Alister Browne, Lisa Eckenwiler, Bernice S. Elger, Veronique Fournier, Amnon Goldworth & Matti Häyry (2005). Akira Akabayashi, MD, Ph. D., is Professor in the Department of Biomedical Ethics at the School of Health Science and Nursing, University of Tokyo Graduate School of Medicine, Tokyo, Japan, and Chair of the Advisory Com-Mittee for Conflicts of Interest, Faculty of Medicine, University of Tokyo. [REVIEW] Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 14:243-245.
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  27. Daniel Callahan, Larry R. Churchill, Denise M. Dudzinski, Carl Elliott, Joseph J. Fins, Renée C. Fox, Michael L. Gross, Lena Halldenius, Matti Häyry & Kenneth V. Iserson (2005). Bette Anton, MLS, is Head Librarian for the Pamela & Kenneth Fong Optometry & Health Sciences Library of the University of California, Berkeley. This Library Serves the UC Berkeley School of Optometry and the UC Berkeley–UC San Francisco Joint Medical Program. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 14:355-356.
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  28. Simona Giordano, Kenneth Gundle, John Harris, Anne Hunsaker Hawkins, Matti Häyry, Kenneth V. Iserson, Greg Loeben, Terrance McConnell & Ann E. Mills (2005). Walt Davis, MD, MA, is Assistant Professor, Director of Graduate Education and a Member of the University of Virginia's Clinical Ethics Service, at the Center for Biomedical Ethics, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Virginia. Raanon Gillon, MD, is the Former Editor of the Journal of Medical Ethics and Emeritus Professor of Medical Ethics, Imperial College, London, England. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 14:1-2.
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  29. Matti Hayry (2005). A Defense of Shallow Listening. Bioethics 19 (5-6):565-567.
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  30. Matti Häyry (2005). A Defense of Ethical Relativism. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 14 (01):7-12.
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  31. Matti Häyry (2005). Precaution and Solidarity. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 14 (2):199-206.
    Health care services are constantly assessed by their ability to accommodate values popular in contemporary societies. Autonomy, justice, and human dignity have for some time been among such values in the affluent West. Relative newcomers in the field are the notions of and which seem to attract, in particular, Continental European ethicists. a.
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  32. Matti Häyry & Tuija Takala (2005). Human Dignity, Bioethics, and Human Rights. Developing World Bioethics 5 (3):225–233.
  33. Matti Hayry & Tuija Takala (2005). Human Dignity, Bioethics, and Human Rights. Developing World Bioethics 5 (3):225-233.
  34. Matti Häyry, Tuija Takala & Peter Herissone-Kelly (2005). Bioethics and Social Reality. Rodopi.
    This book explores the many connections that bioethical thinking has with social reality. Bioethics, if it is to be effective, must engage with and address the actualities of modern life: policies, regulations, markets, opinions, and technological advances. In these original contributions fifteen notable scholars working in the North West of England take on this challenge.Values in Bioethics makes available original philosophical books in all areas of bioethics, including medical and nursing ethics, health care ethics, research ethics, environmental ethics, and global (...)
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  35. Mairi Levitt & Matti Hayry (2005). Overcritical, Overfriendly? A Dialogue Between a Sociologist and a Philosopher on Genetic Technology and its Applications. Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 8 (3):377-383.
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  36. Rachel A. Ankeny, M. L. S. Bette Anton, Ana Borovecki, Alister Browne, Debora Diniz, Elisa J. Gordon, Matti Häyry & Steve Heilig (2004). Akira Akabayashi, MD, Ph. D., is Professor in the Department of Biomedical Ethics at the School of Health Science and Nursing, University of Tokyo Graduate School of Medicine, Tokyo, Japan, and Professor at the School of Public Health, Kyoto University Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto, Japan. [REVIEW] Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 13:215-217.
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  37. Robert V. Brody, Chalmers C. Clark, Michael L. Gross, Heta Aleksandra Gylling, John Harris, Matti Häyry & Susan E. Herz (2004). Bette Anton, MLS, is Head Librarian of the Pamela and Kenneth Fong Optometry and Health Sciences Library. This Library Serves the University of California, Berkeley–University of California, San Francisco Joint Medical Pro-Gram and the University of California, Berkeley, School of Optometry. Richard E. Ashcroft, Ph. D., is Leverhulme Senior Lecturer in Medical Ethics At. [REVIEW] Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 13:1-2.
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  38. Richard E. Champlin, Ka Wah Chan, Leonard M. Fleck, John Harris, Matti Häyry, Søren Holm, Kenneth V. Iserson, Lynn A. Jansen & Martin Korbling (2004). Bette Anton, MLS, is Head Librarian of the Pamela and Kenneth Fong Optometry and Health Sciences Library. This Library Serves the University of California, Berkeley–University of California, San Francisco Joint Medical Pro-Gram and the University of California, Berkeley School of Optometry. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 13:117-118.
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  39. Matti Häyry (2004). Another Look at Dignity. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 13 (01):7-14.
    With the considerable attention given to UNESCO's Universal Declaration on the Human Genome and Human Rights, the time has come to take another look at the concept of dignity, on which this document is morally founded. The term “dignity” now appears in many national constitutions and international bioethical statements. It has also become popular among Continental European ethicists, many of whom wish to challenge the particularly American and overtly individualistic principles of “autonomy,” “justice,” “beneficence,” and “nonmaleficence.” a.
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  40. Matti Häyry & Tuija Takala (2004). Dissecting Bioethics. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 13 (01):3-5.
    Many bioethical disputes are conceptual. This means that people quarrel about the use of words that they see as important. The underlying idea is that whoever wins the verbal argument will also be ethically right.
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  41. Matti Hayry (2003). Philosophical Arguments for and Against Human Reproductive Cloning. Bioethics 17 (5-6):447-460.
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  42. Matti Häyry (2003). Applied Ethics in Finland. Poznan Studies in the Philosophy of the Sciences and the Humanities 80 (1):445-464.
    Finland is internationally known as one of the leading centers of twentieth century analytic philosophy. This volume offers for the first time an overall survey of the Finnish analytic school. The rise of this trend is illustrated by original articles of Edward Westermarck, Eino Kaila, Georg Henrik von Wright, and Jaakko Hintikka. Contributions of Finnish philosophers are then systematically discussed in the fields of logic, philosophy of language, philosophy of science, history of philosophy, ethics and social philosophy. Metaphilosophical reflections on (...)
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  43. Matti Häyry (2003). European Values in Bioethics: Why, What, and How to Be Used. [REVIEW] Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 24 (3):199-214.
    Are there distinctly European values in bioethics, and if there are, what are they? Some Continental philosophers have argued that the principles of dignity, precaution, and solidarity reflect the European ethos better than the liberal concepts of autonomy, harm, and justice. These principles, so the argument goes, elevate prudence over hedonism, communality over individualism, and moral sense over pragmatism. Contrary to what their proponents often believe, however, dignity, precaution, and solidarity can be interpreted in many ways, and it is not (...)
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  44. Matti Häyry & Tuija Takala (eds.) (2003). Scratching the Surface of Bioethics. Rodopi.
    WHAT IS BIOETHICS ALL ABOUT? A START Matti Hayry and Tuija Takala. A Start What is bioethics all about? Is it only about medicine, nursing, and healthcare? ...
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  45. M. L. S. Bette Anton, Claire Brett, Michele A. Carter, Thomas A. Cavanaugh, Pieter de Vries Robbe, Richard Gorlin, Michael L. Gross & Matti Häyry (2001). Carlos Aldana-Valenzuela, MD, is Chief of the Department of Neonatology at the Hospital de Ginecopediatria of the Instituto Mexicano Del Seguro Social in Leon, Guanajuato, Mexico. He is Also a Member of the Center for Studies in Bioethics at the University of Guanajuato. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 10:3-5.
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  46. Thomas A. Cavanaugh, Jean E. Chambers, Tony Cornford, Leonard M. Fleck, Matti Häyry & Thomas K. Hazlet (2001). Mary HM Bach is a Student in the School of Pharmacy at the University of Washington, Seattle. Keith A. Bauer, MSW, is a Graduate Student in the Department of Philosophy/Medical Ethics at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville. His Dissertation Addresses the Ethics and Social Dimensions of Home-Based Telemedicine, the Use of Infor. [REVIEW] Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 10:123-124.
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  47. Matti Häyry (2001). Abortion, Disability, Assent, and Consent. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics: Cq: The International Journal of Healthcare Ethics Committees 10 (1):79.
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  48. Matti Häyry (2001). Response to Special Section: “Cloning: Technology, Policy, and Ethics” (CQ Vol 7, No 2). Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 10 (2):205-208.
    The idea of cloning adult human beings often gives rise to objections involving mad dictators producing copies of themselves, or deranged billionaires who want to live forever. But what about situations where we can more readily understand and accept the reasons for creating a clone? Consider, for instance, the case of parents who have simultaneously lost their newly born child and found out that they cannot have any more children of their own by other known methods. Would it be wrong (...)
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  49. Matti Häyry (2001). Response to “Abortion and Assent” by Rosamond Rhodes (CQ Vol 8, No 4). Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 10 (1):79-87.
    Abortions are legally permitted in most Western societies if there is a reasonable expectation that the child, if born, would be physically or mentally disabled. Even late-term abortions, which would not be allowed in the case of healthy fetuses, are accepted on the basis of foreseen disability.
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  50. Matti Häyry (2001). Response to Special Section: “Cloning: Technology, Policy, and Ethics” (CQ Vol 7, No 2) But What If We Feel That Cloning Is Wrong? [REVIEW] Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 10 (2):205-208.
    The idea of cloning adult human beings often gives rise to objections involving mad dictators producing copies of themselves, or deranged billionaires who want to live forever. But what about situations where we can more readily understand and accept the reasons for creating a clone? Consider, for instance, the case of parents who have simultaneously lost their newly born child and found out that they cannot have any more children of their own by other known methods. Would it be wrong (...)
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