Search results for 'Max Demeter Peyfuss' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Maureen Henry, James G. Colbert, John W. Murphy, Max Demeter Peyfuss, John R. Ehrenberg & Maurice A. Finocchiaro (1981). Reviews. [REVIEW] Studies in East European Thought 22 (4):265-267.score: 870.0
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  2. Ned Block (2006). Max Black's Objection to Mind-Body Identity. Oxford Review of Metaphysics 3:3-78.score: 24.0
    considered an objection (Objection 3) that he says he thought was first put to him by Max Black. He says.
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  3. Bradley E. Starr (1999). The Structure of Max Weber's Ethic of Responsibility. Journal of Religious Ethics 27 (3):407 - 434.score: 24.0
    Max Weber's distinction in "Politics as a Vocation" between the ethic of conviction and the ethic of responsibility is best understood as a distinction between mutually exclusive ethical worldviews. Interpretations that correlate the two ethics with Weber's distinction between value-rational social action and instrumental-rational social action are misleading since Weber assumes that both types of rational social action are present in both ethics. The ethic of conviction recognizes a given hierarchy of values as the context for moral endeavor. The ethic (...)
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  4. Giorgio Ridolfi (2011). A Marxist Who Speaks About God: Reflections on Max Adlers Religiosity and Jewish Sensitivity. Journal of Jewish Thought and Philosophy 19 (1):73-94.score: 24.0
    This paper examines Max Adler's philosophical thought, in order to elucidate how he was able to spot a religious meaning in the materialistic conception of history and to understand his connection to Judaism. The first part expounds on how the prominence of religious issues was perceived in the Marxist milieu; the second part analyzes Adler's particular position, above all in harmony with Kantian philosophy; and the third part brings out the essential differences between Adler's and Kant's ideas on religion. Finally (...)
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  5. Stan van Hooft (2012). Teaching or Preaching—Max Charlesworth and Religious Education. Sophia 51 (4):531-544.score: 24.0
    In this essay I elaborate on the theoretical framework – that of Millian liberalism – that Max Charlesworth brought to many public issues, including that of the relation between education and religion. I will then apply this framework to a debate in which I have been recently involved myself: a debate around the provision of religious instruction in public schools. In the first section I expound Charlesworth’s rejection of secularism in education in a liberal pluralist state and his defence of (...)
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  6. Tetsuya Ishiu & Paul B. Larson (2012). ℛ Max Variations for Separating Club Guessing Principles. Journal of Symbolic Logic 77 (2):532-544.score: 24.0
    In his book on P max [7], Woodin presents a collection of partial orders whose extensions satisfy strong club guessing principles on ω | . In this paper we employ one of the techniques from this book to produce P max variations which separate various club guessing principles. The principle (+) and its variants are weak guessing principles which were first considered by the second author [4] while studying games of length ω | . It was shown in [1] that (...)
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  7. Arilson Silva Oliveira (2009). Desvendando a religião e as religiões mundiais em Max Weber (Revealing religion and the world religions in Max Weber) - DOI: 10.5752/P.2175-5841.2009v7n14p136. [REVIEW] Horizonte 7 (14):136-155.score: 24.0
    Apresentamos Max Weber como um dos sociólogos e historiadores mais importantes dentre aqueles que se dedicaram ao estudo do fenômeno religioso. Na verdade, é possível afirmar que a análise da religião compreende um dos aspectos mais fundamentais de sua obra sócio-histórica. De modo geral, esse tema aparece em seus textos de duas maneiras diferentes, quais sejam: enquanto um objeto analisado em sua singularidade e enquanto uma manifestação social que influencia de maneira significativa os demais aspectos da vida comunitária. Aqui, observamos (...)
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  8. Luca Mori (2013). Max Weber's Concept of "Event", and the Logical Categories of a "Science of Chaos" [Spanish]. Eidos 18:100-123.score: 24.0
    This paper aims at revealing the originality of Max Weber’s conception of the logical category of “historicity”, suggesting that in his writings on the methodology of the social sciences we can find a stimulating and forerunner contribution to the analysis of some logical and formal problems concerning the relationship between human knowledge and the chaos of reality (what we might call, ante-litteram, “science of chaos”). In particular, considering that in Weber’s conception scientific knowledge finds no facts “to grasp” in the (...)
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  9. Simon van Rysewyk, Critique of Max Velmans on Mind-Brain Identity Theory and Consciousness – Part I.score: 21.0
  10. John Perry (2006). Mary and Max and Jack and Ned. In Dean W. Zimmerman (ed.), Oxford Studies in Metaphysics, Volume 2. Oxford: Clarendon Press. 79.score: 21.0
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  11. José Luis Villacañas Berlanga (2011). Beruf, Dasein y Ethik Un análisis de los textos de la polémica sobre La ética protestante y el espíritu del capitalismo de Max Weber. Revista de Filosofía (Madrid) 43:145-162.score: 21.0
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  12. Marguerite La Caze (2009). Max Deutscher's Genre of Philosophy. Crossroads (1):71-78.score: 21.0
     
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  13. Valer Ambrus (2001). Max Webers Wertfreiheitspostulat Und Die Naturalistische Begründung Von Normen. Journal for General Philosophy of Science 32 (2):209-236.score: 18.0
    Max Weber's postulate of value-neutrality and the naturalistic justification of norms. The relationship between facts and values is an essential problem in philosophy, political science and sociology. Usually it is held that there is a wide gap between what is and what ought to be, the nature of which, however, is far from clear. My purpose is to elucidate this relationship by analyzing some well-known articles of Max Weber. I first present Weber's postulate of ‘value-neutrality’ and outline the reasons he (...)
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  14. Joel M. Potter (2012). Arguments From the Priority of Feeling From Contemporary Emotion Theory and Max Scheler's Phenomenology. Quaestiones Disputatae 3 (1):215-225.score: 18.0
    Many so-called “cognitivist” theories of the emotions account for the meaningfulness of emotions in terms of beliefs or judgments that are associated or identified with these emotions. In recent years, a number of analytic philosophers have argued against these theories by pointing out that the objects of emotions are sometimes meaningfully experienced before one can take a reflective stance toward them. Peter Goldie defends this point of view in his book The Emotions: A Philosophical Exploration. Goldie argues that emotions are (...)
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  15. Charles B. Cross (1995). Max Black on the Identity of Indiscernibles. Philosophical Quarterly 45 (180):350-360.score: 18.0
    I give a critique of the argument against the Identity of Indiscernibles found in Max Black's dialogue "The Identity of Indiscernibles". I begin by postulating and giving existence and individuation conditions for actually existent thought experiment characters on analogy with fictional characters as postulated in Peter van Inwagen's "Creatures of Fiction". I then show that Black's two-spheres thought experiment raises not one but two discernibility questions: 1) Is it true in the two-spheres thought experiment that there exist two indiscernible spheres? (...)
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  16. Gregory Nixon (2000). Max Velmans' *Understanding Consciousness*. [REVIEW] Journal of Consciousness Studies 7 (10):96-99.score: 18.0
    This is a fine book. In what has become a crowded field, it stands out as direct, deep, and daring. It should place Max Velmans amongst the stars in the field like Chalmers, Dennett, Searle, and Churchland who are most commonly referenced in consciousness studies books and articles. It is direct in that the de rigueur history and review of the body-mind problem is illuminating and concise. It is deep in that Velmans deconstructs the usual idea of an objective world (...)
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  17. Tapio Puolimatka (2008). Max Scheler and the Idea of a Well Rounded Education. Educational Philosophy and Theory 40 (3):362–382.score: 18.0
    The German philosopher Max Scheler defines the human person as a value-oriented act structure. Since a person is ideally a free being with open possibilities, the aim of education is to help human beings develop their potential in various directions. At the centre of Scheler's educational philosophy is the idea of all-round education, which aims towards a developed capacity for assessment, an ability to make choices and an ability to focus on the objective nature of things.
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  18. Dan Zahavi, Max Scheler.score: 18.0
    Max <span class='Hi'>Ferdinand</span> Scheler was born in Munich on August 22, 1874 and brought up in an orthodox Jewish household.1 Aft er completing high school in 1894, he started to study medicine, philosophy, and psychology. He studied with Th eodor Lipps in Munich, with Georg Simmel and Wilhelm Dilthey in Berlin, and with Rudolf Eucken in Jena,2 where he received his doctorate in 1897 with a thesis entitled Beiträge zur Feststellung der Beziehungen zwischen den logischen und ethischen Prinzipien (Contributions to (...)
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  19. Wolfgang Schluchter (1996). Paradoxes of Modernity: Culture and Conduct in the Theory of Max Weber. Stanford University Press.score: 18.0
    One of the world's pre-eminent Max Weber scholars here presents a comprehensive analysis of Weber's ambiguous stance toward modernity considered from a normative, theoretical, and historical point of view. The book is in two parts. Part I scrutinises Weber's world view. On the basis of his thinking about the meaning and inter-relationships of science, politics, and ethics in the modern era, Weber is seen as the embodiment of a social scientist and political thinker who exposes himself to intellectual risks and (...)
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  20. Lawrence S. Stepelevich (1985). Max Stirner as Hegelian. Journal of the History of Ideas 46 (4).score: 18.0
    From its first appearance in 1844, Max Stirner’s major work, Der Einzige und sein Eigentum ,[1] has produced little agreement among its many interpreters. The very first of these interpreters was Friedrich Engels, who suggested that Stirner’s doctrines would be quite compatible with Benthamite utilitarianism, which he then admired, and even saw in these doctrines the potential of benefiting communism.[2] Marx, in short order, corrected this optimistic deviation, and then—with a surely repentant Engels—set forth the orthodox gospel for all future (...)
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  21. Dietrich von Hildebrand (2005). The Personality of Max Scheler. American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 79 (1):45-55.score: 18.0
    Dietrich von Hildebrand, a close friend of Max Scheler since 1907, wrote this assessment of Scheler’s personality and philosophical style in 1928, just months after Scheler’s death. (Dietrich von Hildebrand, “Max Scheler als Persönlichkeit,” Hochland 26, no. 1 [1928/29]: 70–80.) He explores the extraordinarily rich lived contact with being out of which Scheler philosophized. At the same time he acknowledges the lack of philosophical rigor in many of Scheler’s analyses. He brings out the restlessness of Scheler’s mind and person that (...)
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  22. Alexis Emanuel Gros (2012). El debate de Alfred Schütz con Max Scheler en torno a la empatía. Tópicos 24 (24):00-00.score: 18.0
    La empatía ha sido foco de discusión en los círculos antipositivistas de la academia alemana de comienzos del siglo pasado, especialmente dentro del movimiento fenomenológico. El presente trabajo se concentra en el debate en torno a esta problemática que Alfred Schütz sostiene con Max Scheler en Der sinnhafte Aufbau der sozialen Welt. En el primer apartado se bosquejan los lineamientos principales de la teoría scheleriana de la Fremdwahrnehmung (percepción del otro), y en el segundo, se exponen las críticas que Schütz (...)
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  23. Sung Ho Kim (2004). Max Weber's Politics of Civil Society. Cambridge University Press.score: 18.0
    This book is an in-depth interpretation of Max Weber as a political theorist of civil society. On the one hand, it reads Weber's ideas from the perspective of modern political thought, rather than the modern social sciences; on the other, it offers a liberal assessment of this complex political thinker without attempting to apologize for his shortcomings. Through a fresh reading of Weber's religious, epistemological and political writings, the book shows Weber's concern with public citizenship in a modern mass democracy (...)
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  24. J. C. Berendzen (2008). Postmetaphysical Thinking or Refusal of Thought? Max Horkheimer's Materialism as Philosophical Stance. International Journal of Philosophical Studies 16 (5):695 – 718.score: 18.0
    Frankfurt School critical theory has long opposed metaphysical philosophy because it ignores suffering and injustice. In the face of such criticism, proponents of metaphysics (for example Dieter Henrich) have accused critical theory of not fully investigating the questions is raises for itself, and falling into partial metaphysical positions, despite itself. If one focuses on Max Horkheimer's early essays, such an accusation seems quite fitting. There he vociferously attacks metaphysics, but he also develops a theory that pushes toward metaphysical questions. His (...)
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  25. H. T. Wilson (2004). The Vocation of Reason: Studies in Critical Theory and Social Science in the Age of Max Weber. Brill.score: 18.0
    This book addresses, and at the same time reflects, the impact of Max Weber on both the social sciences and on critical theory's critique of the social sciences ...
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  26. Joaquin Trujillo (2007). Accomplishing Meaning in a Stratified World: An Existential-Phenomenological Reading of Max Weber's 'Class, Status, Party'. [REVIEW] Human Studies 30 (4):345 - 356.score: 18.0
    This is an existential-phenomenological reading of Max Weber’s “Class, Status, Party” that seeks a fuller understanding of meaning accomplishment in a stratified World. I appropriate stratification as a single meaning structure ontically defined by domination, intersubjectivity, and life-chances and ontologically determined by the power-to-be (Seinkönnen), There-being-with-others (Mitdasein), and potentiality (Möglichkeit). I then discuss the significance of these structures in finite transcendence (There-being, Dasein) and describe ways they factually unfold in World achievement. I conclude with logotherapeutic reflections concerning meaning accomplishment in (...)
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  27. J. C. Berendzen (2010). Suffering and Theory: Max Horkheimer's Early Essays and Contemporary Moral Philosophy. Philosophy and Social Criticism 36 (9):1019-1037.score: 18.0
    Max Horkheimer does not generally receive the scholarly attention given to other ‘Frankfurt School’ figures. This is in part because his early work seems contradictory, or unphilosophical. For example, Horkheimer seems, at various points (to use contemporary metaethical terms), like a constructivist, a moral realist, or a moral skeptic, and it is not clear how these views cohere. The goal of this article is to show that the contradictions regarding moral theory exist largely on the surface, and that one can (...)
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  28. Jill North (2008). Review of Max Jammer, Concepts of Simultaneity: From Antiquity to Einstein and Beyond. [REVIEW] American Scientist 96 (1).score: 18.0
    Max Jammer’s recent book, Concepts of Simultaneity: From Antiquity to Einstein and Beyond, traces the history of our ideas on simultaneity as they evolved alongside sweeping changes in our understanding of physics. One of the interesting lessons of the book is that, even as our physical theories have become increasingly successful, the question of the proper understanding or interpretation of those theories remains extremely puzzling. The central issue is this: Is the simultaneity of events a real feature of the world? (...)
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  29. W. G. Runciman (1972). A Critique of Max Weber's Philosophy of Social Science. Cambridge [Eng.]University Press.score: 18.0
    This essay is written in the belief that it is possible to say both where Max Weber's philosophy of social science is mistaken and how these mistakes can be put right. Runciman argues that Weber's analysis breaks down at three decisive points: the difference between theoretical pre-suppositions and implicit value-judgements; the manner in which 'idiographic' explanations are to be subsumed under causal laws; and the relation of explanation to description in sociology. The arguments which Weber put forward are fundamental to (...)
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  30. Nasser Behnegar (2003). Leo Strauss, Max Weber, and the Scientific Study of Politics. University of Chicago Press.score: 18.0
    Can politics be studied scientifically, and if so, how? Assuming it is impossible to justify values by human reason alone, social science has come to consider an unreflective relativism the only viable basis, not only for its own operations, but for liberal societies more generally. Although the experience of the sixties has made social scientists more sensitive to the importance of values, it has not led to a fundamental reexamination of value relativism, which remains the basis of contemporary social science. (...)
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  31. Manfred S. Frings (1965). Max Scheler. Pittsburgh, Duquesne University Press.score: 18.0
    The central theme is a hitherto unknown explanation of the “temporality” of the person as proposed by the late Max Scheler. The first part deals with the meaning of “absolute time” in general. The second part shows how the temporality of the person is to be seen as “absolute” time on the basis of two opposing principles in man: the “life-center” or impulsion, and “mind” which, without the former, remains powerless, but conjoined with it “become” personal in absolute time.
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  32. Yinghua Lu (2014). The a Priori Value and Feeling in Max Scheler and Wang Yangming. 24 (3):197-211.score: 18.0
    Following Mou Zongsan’s interpretation of Wang Yangming, this paper investigates the phenomenology of values and moral emotions in Max Scheler and the Confucian learning of heart, especially Wang Yangming. Part I illustrates the meaning of moral emotions in Confucianism and introduces Wang Yangming’s idea of pure knowing . Part II introduces Max Scheler’s idea of a priori value and feeling in order to explain how pure knowing could be both immanent and transcendental, both subjective and objective. Part III explores the (...)
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  33. Peter Breiner (1996). Max Weber & Democratic Politics. Cornell University Press.score: 18.0
    In this work, Peter Breiner explores the implications of Max Weber's political sociology for political judgment and democratic theory.
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  34. Nancy Evans (2006). Diotima and Demeter as Mystagogues in Plato's Symposium. Hypatia 21 (2):1 - 27.score: 18.0
    Like the goddess Demeter, Diotima from Mantineia, the prophetess who teaches Socrates about eros and the "rites of love" in Plato's Symposium, was a mystagogue who initiated individuals into her mysteries, mediating to humans esoteric knowledge of the divine. The dialogue, including Diotima's speech, contains religious and mystical language, some of which specifically evokes the female-centered yearly celebrations of Demeter at Eleusis. In this essay, I contextualize the worship of Demeter within the larger system of classical Athenian (...)
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  35. Nancy Evans (2006). Diotima and Demeter as Mystagogues in Plato's. Hypatia 21 (2).score: 18.0
    : Like the goddess Demeter, Diotima from Mantineia, the prophetess who teaches Socrates about eros and the "rites of love" in Plato's Symposium, was a mystagogue who initiated individuals into her mysteries, mediating to humans esoteric knowledge of the divine. The dialogue, including Diotima's speech, contains religious and mystical language, some of which specifically evokes the female-centered yearly celebrations of Demeter at Eleusis. In this essay, I contextualize the worship of Demeter within the larger system of classical (...)
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  36. Hans-Ulrich Hoche (2007). Reflexive Monism Versus Complementarism: An Analysis and Criticism of the Conceptual Groundwork of Max Velmans's Reflexive Model of Consciousness. Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 6 (3):389-409.score: 18.0
    From 1990 on, the London psychologist Max Velmans developed a novel approach to (phenomenal) consciousness according to which an experience of an object is phenomenologically identical to an object as experienced. On the face of it I agree; but unlike Velmans I argue that the latter should be understood as comparable, not to a Kantian, but rather to a noematic.
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  37. Michael Symonds & Jason Pudsey (2006). The Forms of Brotherly Love in Max Weber's Sociology of Religion. Sociological Theory 24 (2):133 - 149.score: 18.0
    This article examines the concept of "brotherliness" as presented in Max Weber's sociological studies of religion. It argues that Weber presents a complex, if at times implicit, understanding of a number of contrasting forms of brotherliness: charismatic, Puritan, mystic, and medieval Christian. The article suggests that although these contrasting forms have been largely overlooked by Weberian scholars, they add an important dimension to Weber's understanding of the costs and paradoxes of Western rationalization.
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  38. Michael Esfeld, Review of Max Kistler, Causalité Et Lois de la Nature Paris: Vrin 1999, 311 Pages, FRF 198. [REVIEW]score: 18.0
    Max Kistler’s first book, based on his Paris Ph.D. thesis, is an elaborate defence of a transference theory of causation. Such a theory conceives of causality as the transfer of a conserved quantity. A transference theory of causation is thus one form that a regularity account of causation, as opposed to a counterfactual account, might take. Kistler’s original contribution consists (a) in the way in which he develops an account of causation based on transference and (b) in relating a theory (...)
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  39. Pietro Conte (2012). Un po' più a sinistra, un po' più a destra. Spazio e immagine nell'iconica di Max Imdahl. Aisthesis. Pratiche, Linguaggi E Saperi Dell’Estetico 5 (2).score: 18.0
    In his lifelong effort to overcome the limits of Panofsky’s iconological method, Max Imdahl tried to sketch out an «iconic understanding» which is pre-reflexive, performed below the level of conceptual and verbal explication. Under the auspices of Konrad Fiedler’s theoretical position, Imdahl opposed the Panofskian «recognizing view» with a more formalistic «seeing view», in order to gain access to a third form of vision which he called «knowing view». After outlining Imdahl’s critic of the reduced and unilateral significance of «form» (...)
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  40. Joachim Fischer (2009). Exploring the Core Identity of Philosophical Anthropology Through the Works of Max Scheler, Helmuth Plessner, and Arnold Gehlen. Iris 1 (1):153-170.score: 18.0
    “Philosophical Anthropology,” which is reconstructed here, does not deal with anthropology as a philosophical subdiscipline but rather as a particular philosophical approach within twentieth-century German philosophy, connected with thinkers such as Max Scheler, Helmuth Plessner and Arnold Gehlen. This paper attempts a more precise description of the core identity of Philosophical Anthropology as a paradigm, observes the differences between the authors within the paradigm, and differentiates the paradigm as a whole from other twentieth-century philosophical approaches, such as transcendental philosophy, evolutionary (...)
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  41. Manfred S. Frings (1992). Max Scheler. Philosophy and Theology 6 (3):49-63.score: 18.0
    The central theme is a hitherto unknown explanation of the “temporality” of the person as proposed by the late Max Scheler. The first part deals with the meaning of “absolute time” in general. The second part shows how the temporality of the person is to be seen as “absolute” time on the basis of two opposing principles in man: the “life-center” or impulsion, and “mind” which, without the former, remains powerless, but conjoined with it “become” personal in absolute time.
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  42. Christopher Adair-Toteff (2007). Max Weber and Ernst Toller: Realists or Idealists? History of the Human Sciences 20 (1):1-17.score: 18.0
    Max Weber and Ernst Toller are regarded as political opposites with the former viewed as the responsible realist and the latter as an ethical idealist. I argue that this contrast between the two is not as great as is customarily thought.
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  43. Manfred Frings (1986). Max Scheler. Philosophy and Theology 1 (1):49-63.score: 18.0
    The central theme is a hitherto unknown explanation of the “temporality” of the person as proposed by the late Max Scheler. The first part deals with the meaning of “absolute time” in general. The second part shows how the temporality of the person is to be seen as “absolute” time on the basis of two opposing principles in man: the “life-center” or impulsion, and “mind” which, without the former, remains powerless, but conjoined with it “become” personal in absolute time.
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  44. Wilhelm Hennis (1998). The Spiritualist Foundation of Max Weber's 'Interpretative Sociology': Ernst Troeltsch Max Weber and William James' Varieties of Religious Experience. History of the Human Sciences 11 (2):83-106.score: 18.0
    William James' Varieties of Religious Experience was published in 1902, and translated into German in 1907. This essay explores the develop ment of Max Weber's investigations into human psychology and forms of religious life, arguing that James' work had a lasting impact on Max Weber and coloured the development of his 'sociological' investi gations.
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  45. John Kilcullen, Reading Guide 8: Max Weber.score: 18.0
    Max Weber (1864-1920) was a German academic, a liberal, but a liberal of the Kaiser's Germany: a nationalist, an anti-Socialist (i.e. an anti-Marxist), a Prussian reserve officer. In an autobiographical passage he says, "The usual training for haughty aggression in the duelling fraternity [at university] and as an officer had undoubtedly had a strong influence upon me", GM, p.7. According to the editor's introduction in GM, "The concept of the nation and of national interest... is the limit of (...)'s political outlook and... constitutes his ultimate value", ibid. p.48--i.e. the survival needs of Germany would over-ride any moral restriction. Weber was active in politics as a National Liberal, in opposition to both conservatives and socialists. He was contemptuous of the Kaiser, but supported certain annexationist war aims in World War I. (shrink)
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  46. Lutz Kaelber (2003). Max Weber's Dissertation. History of the Human Sciences 16 (2):27-56.score: 18.0
    The existing scholarly literature on the work and life of Max Weber has almost nothing to say about Max Weber's dissertation which was part of his first book, The History of Commercial Partnerships. This article reconstructs the development of this work. It explores how Weber chose and developed his dissertation, describes its major themes, and analyzes the academic contexts that framed it. Of particular interest is Max Weber's relationship to Levin Goldschmidt, a leading scholar in the history of commercial law, (...)
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  47. Christian List, The Voting Power Approach : A Theory of Measurement. A Response to Max Albert.score: 18.0
    Max <span class='Hi'>Albert</span> (2003) has recently argued that the theory of power indices “should not ... be considered as part of political science” and that “[v]iewed as a scientific theory, it is a branch of probability theory and can safely be ignored by political scientists”. <span class='Hi'>Albert</span>’s argument rests on a particular claim concerning the theoretical status of power indices, namely that the theory of power indices is not a positive theory, i.e. not one that has falsifiable implications. I re-examine (...)
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  48. F. Max Müller (1892). A Comment by Prof. F. Max Müller Concerning the Discussion on Evolution and Language. The Monist 2 (2):286-286.score: 18.0
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  49. M. R. (2001). The Ontology of the Questionnaire - Max Weber on Measurement and Mass Investigation. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 32 (4):647-684.score: 18.0
    Although contemporary sociologists of science have sometimes claimed Max Weber as a methodological precursor, they have not examined Weber's own writings about science. Between 1908 and 1912 Weber published a series of critical studies of the extension of scientific authority into public life. The most notable of these concerned attempts to implement the experimental psychology or psycho-physics laboratory in factories and other real-world settings. Weber's critique centered on the problem of social measurement. He emphasized the discontinuities between the space of (...)
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  50. Peter Breiner (1995). The Political Logic of Economics and the Economic Logic of Modernity in Max Weber. Political Theory 23 (1):25-47.score: 18.0
    The explanation of everything by economic causes alone is never exhaustive in any sense whatsoever, in any sphere of cultural phenomena, not even in the economic sphere itself. Max Weber, “Objectivity”in Social Science and Social Policy (1904).
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