Search results for 'Maxwell Bennett' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. M. Bennett, D. C. Dennett, P. M. S. Hacker & J. R. & Searle (eds.) (2007). Neuroscience and Philosophy: Brain, Mind, and Language. Columbia University Press.score: 360.0
    "Neuroscience and Philosophy" begins with an excerpt from "Philosophical Foundations of Neuroscience," in which Maxwell Bennett and Peter Hacker question the ...
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  2. Peter M. S. Hacker & Maxwell R. Bennett, History of Cognitive Neuroscience.score: 300.0
    History of Cognitive Neuroscience documents the major neuroscientific experiments and theories over the last century and a half in the domain of cognitive neuroscience, and evaluates the cogency of the conclusions that have been drawn from them. Provides a companion work to the highly acclaimed Philosophical Foundations of Neuroscience – combining scientific detail with philosophical insights Views the evolution of brain science through the lens of its principal figures and experiments Addresses philosophical criticism of Bennett and Hacker′s previous book (...)
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  3. Charles H. Bennett (2003). Notes on Landauer's Principle, Reversible Computation, and Maxwell's Demon. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part B 34 (3):501-510.score: 240.0
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  4. Maxwell Bennett & Peter Hacker (2011). Criminal Law as It Pertains to Patients Suffering From Psychiatric Diseases. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 8 (1):45-58.score: 240.0
    The McNaughton rules for determining whether a person can be successfully defended on the grounds of mental incompetence were determined by a committee of the House of Lords in 1843. They arose as a consequence of the trial of Daniel McNaughton for the killing of Prime Minister Sir Robert Peel’s secretary. In retrospect it is clear that McNaughton suffered from schizophrenia. The successful defence of McNaughton on the grounds of mental incompetence by his advocate Sir Alexander Cockburn involved a profound (...)
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  5. Maxwell R. Bennett & Peter Michael Stephan Hacker (2009). Andrew Adamatzky, Dynamics of Crowd-Minds: Patterns of Irrationality in Emotions, Beliefs and Actions. Singapore/London/River Edge, NJ: World Scientific, 2005, Xii+ 251 Pages; ISBN 981-256-286-9 (Hardcover). Frederick Adams and Keneth Aizawa, The Bounds of Cognition. Malden, MA/Oxford/Carlton: Blackwell Publishing, Xii+ 197 Pages; ISBN 978-1-4051-4914-3 (Hardcover). [REVIEW] Pragmatics and Cognition 17 (1):197-201.score: 240.0
     
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  6. Maxwell Bennett, Daniel Dennett, Peter Hacker & John Searle (forthcoming). Neuroscience and Philosophy: Brain. Mind, and Language. Columbia University Press, New York.score: 240.0
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  7. Arthur W. Collins & Daniel C. Bennett (1966). Jonathan Bennett on Rationality: Two Reviews. Journal of Philosophy 63 (May):253-266.score: 180.0
     
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  8. Peter Gratton, Graham Harman, Jane Bennett, Tim Morton, Levi Bryant & Paul Ennis (2010). Interviews: Graham Harman, Jane Bennett, Tim Morton, Ian Bogost, Levi Bryant and Paul Ennis. Speculations 1 (1):84-134.score: 120.0
    The context for these interviews was a seminar [Peter Gratton] conducted on speculative realism in the Spring 2010. There has been great interest in speculative realism and one reason Gratton surmise[s] is not just the arguments offered, though [Gratton doesn't] want to take away from them; each of these scholars are vivid writers and great pedagogues, many of whom are in constant contact with their readers via their weblogs. Thus these interviews provided an opportunity to forward student questions about their (...)
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  9. Nicholas Maxwell, Nicholas Maxwell.score: 120.0
    We are in a state of impending crisis. And the fault lies in part with academia. For two centuries or so, academia has been devoted to the pursuit of knowledge and technological know-how. This has enormously increased our power to act which has, in turn, brought us both all the great benefits of the modern world and the crises we now face. Modern science and technology have made possible modern industry and agriculture, the explosive growth of the world’s population, global (...)
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  10. Jonathan Bennett (2001). Conditionals and Explanations Jonathan Bennett. In Alex Byrne, Robert Stalnaker & Ralph Wedgwood (eds.), Fact and Value. Mit Press. 1.score: 120.0
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  11. Arnold Bennett (1996). Comment About Father McNabb From the Journal of Arnold Bennett, February 7, 1928. The Chesterton Review 22 (1/2):221-221.score: 120.0
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  12. John G. Bennett (2008/1991). Idiots in Paris: Diaries of J.G. Bennett and Elizabeth Bennett, 1949. Bennett Books.score: 120.0
     
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  13. John G. Bennett (1977/1988). John G. Bennett's Talks on Beelzebub's Tales. S. Weiser.score: 120.0
     
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  14. M. Maxwell & C. Wade Savage (eds.) (1989). Science, Mind, and Psychology: Essays in Honor of Grover Maxwell. University Press of America.score: 120.0
  15. Daniel Lim (2009). Neuroscience and Philosophy: Brain, Mind, and Language. By Maxwell Bennett, Daniel Dennett, Peter Hacker, and John Searle. Zygon 44 (4):1003-1005.score: 90.0
  16. Nicolas Payette & Pierre Poirier (2009). Maxwell Bennett, Daniel Dennett, Peter Hacker, John Searle, Neuroscience and Philosophy, New York, Columbia University Press, 2007, 215p.Maxwell Bennett, Daniel Dennett, Peter Hacker, John Searle, Neuroscience and Philosophy, New York, Columbia University Press, 2007, 215p. [REVIEW] Philosophiques 36 (1):260-265.score: 90.0
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  17. Nicholas Maxwell (2007). The Enlightenment, Popper and Einstein. In ShiY (ed.), Knowledge and Wisdom. IOS Press.score: 60.0
    The Enlightenment, Popper and Einstein Abstract Nicholas Maxwell Email: nicholas.maxwell@ucl.ac.uk In this paper I discuss four versions of the basic idea of the French Enlightenment of the 18th century, namely: To learn from scientific progress how to achieve social progress towards an enlightened world. These four versions are: 1. The Traditional Enlightenment Programme. 2. The Popperian Version of the Enlightenment Programme. 3. The Improved Popperian Enlightenment Programme. 4. The New Enlightenment Programme. The Traditional Enlightenment Programme is the version (...)
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  18. Jonathan Bennett, Accountability.score: 60.0
    I shall present a problem about accountability, and its solution by Strawson’s ‘Freedom and Resentment’. Some readers of this don’t see it as a profound contribution to moral philosophy, and I want to help them. It may be helpful to follow up Strawson’s gracefully written discussion with a more staccato presentation. My treatment will also be angled somewhat differently from his, so that its lights and shadows will fall with a certain difference, which may make it serviceable even to the (...)
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  19. Nicholas Maxwell (2005). A Mug's Game? Solving the Problem of Induction with Metaphysical Presuppositions. In John Earman & John Norton (eds.), PhilSci Archive.score: 60.0
    A Mug's Game? Solving the Problem of Induction with Metaphysical Presuppositions Nicholas Maxwell Emeritus Reader in Philosophy of Science at University College London Email: nicholas.maxwell@ucl.ac.uk Website: www.nick-maxwell.demon.co.uk Abstract This paper argues that a view of science, expounded and defended elsewhere, solves the problem of induction. The view holds that we need to see science as accepting a hierarchy of metaphysical theses concerning the comprehensibility and knowability of the universe, these theses asserting less and less as we go (...)
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  20. Graham Cairns-Smith, Thomas W. Clark, Ravi Gomatam, Robert H. Kane, Nicholas Maxwell, J. J. C. Smart, Sean A. Spence & Henry P. Stapp (2005). Commentaries on David Hodgson's "a Plain Person's Free Will&Quot;. Journal of Consciousness Studies 12 (1):20-75.score: 60.0
    REMARKS ON EVOLUTION AND TIME-SCALES, Graham Cairns-Smith; HODGSON'S BLACK BOX, Thomas Clark; DO HODGSON'S PROPOSITIONS UNIQUELY CHARACTERIZE FREE WILL?, Ravi Gomatam; WHAT SHOULD WE RETAIN FROM A PLAIN PERSON'S CONCEPT OF FREE WILL?, Gilberto Gomes; ISOLATING DISPARATE CHALLENGES TO HODGSON'S ACCOUNT OF FREE WILL, Liberty Jaswal; FREE AGENCY AND LAWS OF NATURE, Robert Kane; SCIENCE VERSUS REALIZATION OF VALUE, NOT DETERMINISM VERSUS CHOICE, Nicholas Maxwell; COMMENTS ON HODGSON, J.J.C. Smart; THE VIEW FROM WITHIN, Sean Spence; COMMENTARY ON HODGSON, Henry (...)
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  21. Nicholas Maxwell (2000). A New Conception of Science. Physics World 13 (8):17-18.score: 60.0
    When scientists choose one theory over another, they reject out of hand all those that are not simple, unified or explanatory. Yet the orthodox view of science is that evidence alone should determine what can be accepted. Nicholas Maxwell thinks he has a way out of the dilemma.
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  22. Jonathan Francis Bennett (2001). Learning From Six Philosophers: Descartes, Spinoza, Leibniz, Locke, Berkeley, Hume, 2 Volumes. Oxford University Press (Hardcover).score: 60.0
    In this illuminating, highly engaging book, Jonathan Bennett acquaints us with the ideas of six great thinkers of the early modern period: Descartes, Spinoza, Leibniz, Locke, Berkeley, and Hume. For newcomers to the early modern scene, this lucidly written work is an excellent introduction. For those already familiar with the time period, this book offers insight into the great philosophers, treating them as colleagues, antagonists, students, and teachers.
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  23. Nicholas Maxwell (2010). Universities: From Knowledge to Wisdom. Scientists for Global Responsibility Newsletter (38):18-20.score: 60.0
    Nicholas Maxwell argues that the growth in academic work devoted to policy issues could mark the beginning of a shift from ‘knowledge-inquiry’ to ‘wisdom-inquiry’, leading to importance benefits for society.
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  24. Nicholas Maxwell (2008). Do We Need a Scientific Revolution? Journal for Biological Physics and Chemistry 8 (3):95-105.score: 60.0
    Do We Need a Scientific Revolution? (Published in the Journal of Biological Physics and Chemistry, vol. 8, no. 3, September 2008) Nicholas Maxwell (Emeritus Reader in Philosophy of Science at University College London) www.nick-maxwell.demon.co.uk Abstract Many see modern science as having serious defects, intellectual, social, moral. Few see this as having anything to do with the philosophy of science. I argue that many diverse ills of modern science are a consequence of the fact that the scientific community has (...)
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  25. Jonathan Bennett (2003). A Philosophical Guide to Conditionals. Oxford University Press.score: 60.0
    Conditional sentences are among the most intriguing and puzzling features of language, and analysis of their meaning and function has important implications for, and uses in, many areas of philosophy. Jonathan Bennett, one of the world's leading experts, distils many years' work and teaching into this Philosophical Guide to Conditionals, the fullest and most authoritative treatment of the subject. An ideal introduction for undergraduates with a philosophical grounding, it also offers a rich source of illumination and stimulation for graduate (...)
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  26. Christopher Bennett (2008). The Apology Ritual: A Philosophical Theory of Punishment. Cambridge University Press.score: 60.0
    Christopher Bennett presents a theory of punishment grounded in the practice of apology, and in particular in reactions such as feeling sorry and making amends. He argues that offenders have a 'right to be punished' - that it is part of taking an offender seriously as a member of a normatively demanding relationship (such as friendship or collegiality or citizenship) that she is subject to retributive attitudes when she violates the demands of that relationship. However, while he claims that (...)
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  27. Jonathan Francis Bennett (1974). Kant's Dialectic. New York]Cambridge University Press.score: 60.0
    Jonathan Bennett here examines the second half of the Critique of Pure Reason, the Dialectic, where Kant is concerned with problems about substance, the nature ...
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  28. Nicholas Maxwell (1998). The Comprehensibility of the Universe: A New Conception of Science. Oxford University Press.score: 60.0
    This book puts forth a radically new conception of science. Maxwell argues that the prevailing view of the relation between scientific theory and evidence is untenable; he calls for a new orthodoxy that sees science as making a hierarchy of assumptions about the comprehensibility of the universe. This new conception has significant implications for both philosophy and science, promises to heal the rift between the two, and will be essential reading for people working in both fields.
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  29. Nicholas Maxwell (2014). How Universities Can Help Create a Wiser World: The Urgent Need for an Academic Revolution. Imprint Academic.score: 60.0
    In order to make progress towards a better world we need to learn how to do it. And for that we need institutions of learning rationally designed and devoted to helping us solve our global problems, make progress towards a better world. It is just this that we lack at present. Our universities pursue knowledge. They are neither designed nor devoted to helping humanity learn how to tackle global problems — problems of living — in more intelligent, humane and effective (...)
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  30. M. Bayram, J. P. Bennett & M. C. Dewar (1993). Using Computer Algebra to Determine Rate Constants in Biochemistry. Acta Biotheoretica 41 (1-2).score: 60.0
    In earlier work we have described how computer algebra may be used to derive composite rate laws for complete systems of equations, using the mathematical technique of Gröbner Bases (Bennett, Davenport and Sauro, 1988). Such composite rate laws may then be fitted to experimental data to yield estimates of kinetic parameters.Recently we have been investigating the practical application of this methodology to the estimation of kinetic parameters for the closed two enzyme system of aspartate aminotransferase (AAT) and malate dehydrogenase (...)
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  31. Amel Alghrani, Rebecca Bennett & Suzanne Ost (eds.) (2012). Bioethics, Medicine, and the Criminal Law: The Criminal Law and Bioethical Conflict: Walking the Tightrope. Cambridge University Press.score: 60.0
    Machine generated contents note: 1. Introduction - when criminal law encounters bioethics: a case of tensions and incompatibilities or an apt forum for resolving ethical conflict? Amel Alghrani, Rebecca Bennett and Suzanne Ost; Part I. Death, Dying, and the Criminal Law: 2. Euthanasia and assisted suicide should, when properly performed by a doctor in an appropriate case, be decriminalised John Griffiths; 3. Five flawed arguments for decriminalising euthanasia John Keown; 4. Euthanasia excused: between prohibition and permission Richard Huxtable; Part (...)
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  32. Bruce Maxwell, David I. Waddington, Kevin McDonough, Andrée-Anne Cormier & Marina Schwimmer (2012). Interculturalism, Multiculturalism, and the State Funding and Regulation of Conservative Religious Schools. Educational Theory 62 (4):427-447.score: 60.0
    In this essay, Bruce Maxwell, David Waddington, Kevin McDonough, Andrée-Anne Cormier, and Marina Schwimmer compare two competing approaches to social integration policy, Multiculturalism and Interculturalism, from the perspective of the issue of the state funding and regulation of conservative religious schools. After identifying the key differences between Interculturalism and Multiculturalism, as well as their many similarities, the authors present an explanatory analysis of this intractable policy challenge. Conservative religious schooling, they argue, tests a conceptual tension inherent in Multiculturalism between (...)
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  33. N. Maxwell (2009). Replies and Reflections. In Leemon McHenry (ed.), Science and the Pursuit of Wisdom: Studies in the Philosophy of Nicholas Maxwell. Ontos Verlag.score: 60.0
    I reply to critical discussion of my work by Copthorne Macdonald, Steve Fuller, John Stewart, Joseph Agassi, Margaret Boden, Donald Gillies, Mathew Iredale, David Hodgson, Karl Rogers, and Leemon McHenry.
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  34. Amel Alghrani, Rebecca Bennett & Suzanne Ost (eds.) (2013). Bioethics, Medicine, and the Criminal Law. Cambridge University Press.score: 60.0
    Machine generated contents note: 1. Introduction - when criminal law encounters bioethics: a case of tensions and incompatibilities or an apt forum for resolving ethical conflict? Amel Alghrani, Rebecca Bennett and Suzanne Ost; Part I. Death, Dying, and the Criminal Law: 2. Euthanasia and assisted suicide should, when properly performed by a doctor in an appropriate case, be decriminalised John Griffiths; 3. Five flawed arguments for decriminalising euthanasia John Keown; 4. Euthanasia excused: between prohibition and permission Richard Huxtable; Part (...)
     
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  35. George Bennett (2008). Foreword to New Edition. In John G. Bennett (ed.), Idiots in Paris: Diaries of J.G. Bennett and Elizabeth Bennett, 1949. Bennett Books.score: 60.0
     
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  36. Jonathan Bennett (2003). Learning From Six Philosophers: Descartes, Spinoza, Leibniz, Locke, Berkeley, Hume, Volume 1. Clarendon Press (Paperback).score: 60.0
    Jonathan Bennett engages with the thought of six great thinkers of the early modern period: Descartes, Spinoza, Leibniz, Locke, Berkeley, Hume. While not neglecting the historical setting of each, his chief focus is on the words they wrote. What problem is being tackled? How exactly is the solution meant to work? Does it succeed? If not, why not? What can we learn from its success or its failure? These questions reflect Bennett's dedication to engaging with philosophy as philosophy, (...)
     
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  37. Jonathan Bennett (2003). Learning From Six Philosophers: Descartes, Spinoza, Leibniz, Locke, Berkeley, Hume, Volume 2. Clarendon Press (Paperback).score: 60.0
    Jonathan Bennett engages with the thought of six great thinkers of the early modern period: Descartes, Spinoza, Leibniz, Locke, Berkeley, Hume. While not neglecting the historical setting of each, his chief focus is on the words they wrote. What problem is being tackled? How exactly is the solution meant to work? Does it succeed? If not, why not? What can we learn from its success or its failure? These questions reflect Bennett's dedication to engaging with philosophy as philosophy, (...)
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  38. Jonathan Bennett (2003). Learning From Six Philosophers, Volume 1: Descartes, Spinoza, Leibniz, Locke, Berkeley, Hume. Clarendon Press.score: 60.0
    Jonathan Bennett engages with the thought of six great thinkers of the early modern period: Descartes, Spinoza, Leibniz, Locke, Berkeley, Hume. While not neglecting the historical setting of each, his chief focus is on the words they wrote. What problem is being tackled? How exactly is the solution meant to work? Does it succeed? If not, why not? What can be learned from its success or failure? For newcomers to the early modern scene, this clearly written work is an (...)
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  39. Jonathan Bennett (2003). Learning From Six Philosophers, Volume 2: Descartes, Spinoza, Leibniz, Locke, Berkeley, Hume. Clarendon Press.score: 60.0
    Jonathan Bennett engages with the thought of six great thinkers of the early modern period: Descartes, Spinoza, Leibniz, Locke, Berkeley, and Hume. While not neglecting the historical setting of each, his chief focus is on the words they wrote. What problem is being tackled? How exactly is the solution meant to work? Does it succeed? If not, why not? What can be learned from its success or failure? For newcomers to the early modern scene, this clearly written work is (...)
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  40. Jonathan Bennett (2001). Learning From Six Philosophers: Volume 2. Clarendon Press.score: 60.0
    Jonathan Bennett engages with the thought of six great thinkers of the early modern period: Descaretes, Spinoza, Leibniz, Locke, Berkeley, Hume. While not neglecting the historical setting of each, his chief focus is on the words they wrote. What problem is being tackled? How exactly is the solution meant to work? Does it succeed? If not, why not? What can be learned from its success or failure? For newcomers to the early modern scene, this clearly written work is an (...)
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  41. Elizabeth Bennett (2008). Original Foreword. In John G. Bennett (ed.), Idiots in Paris: Diaries of J.G. Bennett and Elizabeth Bennett, 1949. Bennett Books.score: 60.0
     
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  42. John C. Bennett (ed.) (1967). Storm Over Ethics. Philadelphia]United Church Press.score: 60.0
    Principles and the context, by J. C. Bennett.--Love monism, by J. M. Gustafson.--Responsibility in freedom, by E. C. Gardner.--The new morality, by G. Fackre.--When love becomes excarnate, by H. L. Smith.--Situational morality, by R. W. Gleason.--The nature of heresy, by G. Kennedy.--Situation ethics under fire, by J. Fletcher.
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  43. Jonathan Francis Bennett (1995). The Act Itself. Oxford University Press.score: 60.0
    In this major new book, the internationally renowned thinker Jonathan Bennett offers a deeper understanding of what is going on in our own moral thoughts about human behavior. The Act Itself presents a conceptual analysis of descriptions of behavior on which we base our moral judgements, and shows that this analysis can be used as a means toward getting more control of our thoughts and thus of our lives.
     
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  44. Mary Lou Maxwell (1989). Interpreting Russell: The Eye of the Beholder. In M. Maxwell & C. Wade Savage (eds.), Science, Mind, and Psychology: Essays in Honor of Grover Maxwell. University Press of America.score: 60.0
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  45. Nicholas Maxwell (1997). Science and the Environment: A New Enlightenment. Science and Public Affairs (Spring 1997):50-56.score: 60.0
    Nicholas Maxwell believes that while we have developed an excellent way of learning about the nature of the universe, we have so far failed in our attempts to apply this method to create a civilized world.
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  46. John D. Norton, And the Return of Maxwell's Demon.score: 42.0
    Landauer’s principle is the loosely formulated notion that the erasure of n bits of information must always incur a cost of k ln n in thermodynamic entropy. It can be formulated as a precise result in statistical mechanics, but for a restricted class of erasure processes that use a thermodynamically irreversible phase space expansion, which is the real origin of the law’s entropy cost and whose necessity has not been demonstrated. General arguments that purport to establish the unconditional validity of (...)
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  47. John D. Norton (2005). Eaters of the Lotus: Landauer's Principle and the Return of Maxwell's Demon. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part B 36 (2):375-411.score: 42.0
    Landauer’s principle is the loosely formulated notion that the erasure of n bits of information must always incur a cost of k ln n in thermodynamic entropy. It can be formulated as a precise result in statistical mechanics, but by erasure processes that use a thermodynamically irreversible phase space expansion, which is the real origin of the law’s entropy cost. General arguments that purport to establish the unconditional validity of the law (erasure maps many physical states to one; erasure compresses (...)
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  48. Nicholas Maxwell (2010). Reply to Comments on Science and the Pursuit of Wisdom. Philosophia 38 (4):667-690.score: 30.0
    In this article I reply to comments made by Agustin Vicente and Giridhari Lal Pandit on Science and the Pursuit of Wisdom (McHenry 2009 ). I criticize analytic philosophy, go on to expound the argument for the need for a revolution in academic inquiry so that the basic aim becomes wisdom and not just knowledge, defend aim-oriented empiricism, outline my solution to the human world/physical universe problem, and defend the thesis that free will is compatible with physicalism.
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  49. Karen Bennett (2003). Why the Exclusion Problem Seems Intractable and How, Just Maybe, to Tract It. Noûs 37 (3):471-97.score: 30.0
    The basic form of the exclusion problem is by now very, very familiar. 2 Start with the claim that the physical realm is causally complete: every physical thing that happens has a sufficient physical cause. Add in the claim that the mental and the physical are distinct. Toss in some claims about overdetermination, give it a stir, and voilá—suddenly it looks as though the mental never causes anything, at least nothing physical. As it is often put, the physical does all (...)
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  50. Nicholas Maxwell, Non-Empirical Requirements Scientific Theories Must Satisfy: Simplicity, Unification, Explanation, Beauty. PhilSci Archive.score: 30.0
    A scientific theory, in order to be accepted as a part of theoretical scientific knowledge, must satisfy both empirical and non-empirical requirements, the latter having to do with simplicity, unity, explanatory character, symmetry, beauty. No satisfactory, generally accepted account of such non-empirical requirements has so far been given. Here, a proposal is put forward which, it is claimed, makes a contribution towards solving the problem. This proposal concerns unity of physical theory. In order to satisfy the non-empirical requirement of unity, (...)
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