Search results for 'May A. Webber' (try it on Scholar)

1000+ found
Order:
  1.  24
    T. P. A. (1971). Review of J. A. May, Kant's Concept of Geography. [REVIEW] Review of Metaphysics 24 (3):545-545.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  2.  9
    Graham Gee & Grégoire C. N. Webber (2010). What Is a Political Constitution? Oxford Journal of Legal Studies 30 (2):273-299.
    The question—what is a political constitution?—might seem, at first blush, fairly innocuous. At one level, the idea of a political constitution seems fairly well settled, at least insofar as most political constitutionalists subscribe to a similar set of commitments, arguments and assumptions. At a second, more reflective level, however, there remains some doubt whether a political constitution purports to be a descriptive or normative account of a real world constitution, such as Britain’s. By exploring the idea of a political constitution (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  3.  11
    May A. Webber (1988). No Moral Responsibility Without Alternative Possibilities. Journal of Critical Analysis 9 (1):27-34.
  4. Todd May (2015). Nonviolent Resistance: A Philosophical Introduction. Polity.
    We see nonviolent resistance all over today’s world, from Egypt’s Tahrir Square to New York Occupy. Although we think of the last century as one marked by wars and violent conflict, in fact it was just as much a century of nonviolence as the achievements of Mohandas Gandhi and Martin Luther King, Jr. and peaceful protests like the one that removed Ferdinand Marcos from the Philippines clearly demonstrate. But what is nonviolence? What makes a campaign a nonviolent one, and how (...)
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  5. Todd May (2015). Nonviolent Resistance: A Philosophical Introduction. Polity.
    We see nonviolent resistance all over today’s world, from Egypt’s Tahrir Square to New York Occupy. Although we think of the last century as one marked by wars and violent conflict, in fact it was just as much a century of nonviolence as the achievements of Mohandas Gandhi and Martin Luther King, Jr. and peaceful protests like the one that removed Ferdinand Marcos from the Philippines clearly demonstrate. But what is nonviolence? What makes a campaign a nonviolent one, and how (...)
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  6. Todd May (2015). Nonviolent Resistance: A Philosophical Introduction. Polity.
    We see nonviolent resistance all over today’s world, from Egypt’s Tahrir Square to New York Occupy. Although we think of the last century as one marked by wars and violent conflict, in fact it was just as much a century of nonviolence as the achievements of Mohandas Gandhi and Martin Luther King, Jr. and peaceful protests like the one that removed Ferdinand Marcos from the Philippines clearly demonstrate. But what is nonviolence? What makes a campaign a nonviolent one, and how (...)
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  7. Todd May (2015). Nonviolent Resistance: A Philosophical Introduction. Polity.
    We see nonviolent resistance all over today’s world, from Egypt’s Tahrir Square to New York Occupy. Although we think of the last century as one marked by wars and violent conflict, in fact it was just as much a century of nonviolence as the achievements of Mohandas Gandhi and Martin Luther King, Jr. and peaceful protests like the one that removed Ferdinand Marcos from the Philippines clearly demonstrate. But what is nonviolence? What makes a campaign a nonviolent one, and how (...)
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  8. Larry May (2010). Genocide: A Normative Account. Cambridge University Press.
    Larry May examines the normative and conceptual problems concerning the crime of genocide. Genocide arises out of the worst of horrors. Legally, however, the unique character of genocide is reduced to a technical requirement, that the perpetrator's act manifest an intention to destroy a protected group. From this definition, many puzzles arise. How are groups to be identified and why are only four groups subject to genocide? What is the harm of destroying a group and why is this harm thought (...)
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   5 citations  
  9.  11
    Thomas May (2002). Bioethics in a Liberal Society: The Political Framework of Bioethics Decision Making. Johns Hopkins University Press.
    Issues concerning patients' rights are at the center of bioethics, but the political basis for these rights has rarely been examined. In Bioethics in a Liberal Society: The Political Framework of Bioethics Decision Making , Thomas May offers a compelling analysis of how the political context of liberal constitutional democracy shapes the rights and obligations of both patients and health care professionals. May focuses on how a key feature of liberal society -- namely, an individual's right to make independent decisions (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   6 citations  
  10.  74
    Simon May (ed.) (2011). Nietzsche's on the Genealogy of Morality: A Critical Guide. Cambridge University Press.
    Machine generated contents note: List of contributors; Acknowledgements; Note on texts, translations, references; Introduction Simon May; 1. The future of evil Raymond Geuss; 2. On the nobility of Nietzsche's priests R. Lanier Anderson; 3. The genealogy of guilt Bernard Reginster; 4. Why Nietzsche is still in the morality game Simon May; 5. Who is the 'sovereign individual'? Nietzsche on freedom Brian Leiter; 6. Ressentiment and morality Peter Poellner; 7. The role of life in the Genealogy Nadeem Hussain; 8. The relevance (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  11.  13
    John D'Arcy May (2013). Hyphenated Christians: Towards a Better Understanding of Dual Religious Belonging [Book Review]. The Australasian Catholic Record 90 (1):119.
    May, John D'Arcy Review(s) of: Hyphenated Christians: Towards a better understanding of dual religious belonging, by Gideon Goosen, (Oxford/Bern/New York: Peter Lang, 2011), pp. xviii + 172.
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  12.  7
    Ruth Webber & Kate Jones (2011). A Catholic Community Response to the 2009 Bushfires. The Australasian Catholic Record 88 (3):259.
    Webber, Ruth; Jones, Kate This paper is about how three Catholic agencies carved out and adapted over time a role for themselves in assisting in the recovery after the Victorian bushfires of 2009. It tracks the process from the time the Archbishop of Melbourne commissioned Catholic Social Services Victoria to survey the bushfire affected areas and work out where there were gaps in services that the Catholic agencies could fill. A significant amount of funding was allocated to the provision (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  13.  10
    Katherine Forbes, Eleni Miltsakaki, Rashmi Prasad, Anoop Sarkar, Aravind Joshi & Bonnie Webber (2003). D-LTAG System: Discourse Parsing with a Lexicalized Tree-Adjoining Grammar. [REVIEW] Journal of Logic, Language and Information 12 (3):261-279.
    We present an implementation of a discourse parsing system for alexicalized Tree-Adjoining Grammar for discourse, specifying the integrationof sentence and discourse level processing. Our system is based on theassumption that the compositional aspects of semantics at thediscourse level parallel those at the sentence level. This coupling isachieved by factoring away inferential semantics and anaphoric features ofdiscourse connectives. Computationally, this parallelism is achievedbecause both the sentence and discourse grammar are LTAG-based and the sameparser works at both levels. The approach to an (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  14.  9
    M. A. & H. Kh, Behavior of a Magnetic Dipole Freely Floating on Water Surface.
    In this paper, the authors have detected a new effect in the area of geomagnetism, related to the behavior of a magnetic dipole freely floating on water surface. An experiment is described in the present paper in which a magnetic dipole fixed upon a float placed on non- magnetized water surface undergoes displacement along with reorientation caused by fine structure of the earth's magnetic field. This fact can probably be explained by secular decrease of the earth's major dipole moment. Further, (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  15. Larry May (2012). Genocide: A Normative Account. Cambridge University Press.
    Larry May examines the normative and conceptual problems concerning the crime of genocide. Genocide arises out of the worst of horrors. Legally, however, the unique character of genocide is reduced to a technical requirement, that the perpetrator's act manifest an intention to destroy a protected group. From this definition, many puzzles arise. How are groups to be identified and why are only four groups subject to genocide? What is the harm of destroying a group and why is this harm thought (...)
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  16.  36
    Thaddeus Metz (2015). Review of Todd May, A Significant Life. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 8 (19).
    Approx. 2000 word review of Todd May's _A Significant Life: Human Meaning in a Silent Universe_ (University of Chicago Press).
    Translate
      Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  17. Bill Wringe (2014). May I Treat A Collective As A Mere Means. American Philosophical Quarterly 51 (3):273-284.
    According to Kant, it is impermissible to treat humanity as a mere means. If we accept Kant's equation of humanity with rational agency, and are literalists about ascriptions of agency to collectives it appears to follow that we may not treat collectives as mere means. On most standard accounts of what it is to treat something as a means this conclusion seems highly implausible. I conclude that we are faced with a range of options. One would be to rethink the (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  18.  48
    Robert E. Goodin & Christian List (2006). A Conditional Defense of Plurality Rule: Generalizing May's Theorem in a Restricted Informational Environment. American Journal of Political Science 50 (4):940-949.
    May's theorem famously shows that, in social decisions between two options, simple majority rule uniquely satisfies four appealing conditions. Although this result is often cited in support of majority rule, it has never been extended beyond decisions based on pairwise comparisons of options. We generalize May's theorem to many-option decisions where voters each cast one vote. Surprisingly, plurality rule uniquely satisfies May's conditions. This suggests a conditional defense of plurality rule: If a society's balloting procedure collects only a single vote (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   5 citations  
  19.  7
    Thomas A. Stoffregen (2004). There May Not Be an a-Not-B Error. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 27 (5):708-709.
    In the A-not-B situation children reach toward location A when the object is at location B. Researchers interpret this as an error. I question this interpretation. Reaches are inaccurate only if the intention actually is to obtain the hidden object. If this is not the goal, then reaching for A may be accurate and there may be no error to be explained.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  20. Steven L. Davis (2003). The Least Harm Principle May Require That Humans Consume a Diet Containing Large Herbivores, Not a Vegan Diet. Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 16 (4):387-394.
    Based on his theory of animalrights, Regan concludes that humans are morallyobligated to consume a vegetarian or vegandiet. When it was pointed out to him that evena vegan diet results in the loss of manyanimals of the field, he said that while thatmay be true, we are still obligated to consumea vegetarian/vegan diet because in total itwould cause the least harm to animals (LeastHarm Principle, or LHP) as compared to currentagriculture. But is that conclusion valid? Isit possible that some other (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   6 citations  
  21.  84
    Joshua Rasmussen (2012). Presentists May Say Goodbye to A-Properties. Analysis 72 (2):270-276.
    Philosophers of time say that if presentism is true (i.e. if reality is comprised solely of presently existing things), then a complete description of reality must contain tensed terms, such as ‘was’, ‘presently is’ and ‘will be’. I counter this viewpoint by explaining how the presentist may de-tense our talk about times. I argue, furthermore, that, since the A-theory of time denies the success of any such de-tensing strategy, presentism is not a version of the A-theory – contrary to the (...)
    Direct download (12 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   6 citations  
  22. Marcus Arvan (2014). Why Hobbes Cannot Limit the Leviathan: A Critical Commentary on Larry May's Limiting Leviathan. Hobbes Studies 27 (2):171-177.
    This commentary contends that Larry May’s Hobbesian argument for limitations on sovereignty and lawmaking in Limiting Leviathan does not succeed. First, I show that Hobbes begins with a plausible instrumental theory of normativity. Second, I show that Hobbes then attempts, unsuccessfully—by his own lights—to defend a kind of non-instrumental, moral normativity. Thus, I contend, in order to successfully “limit the Leviathan” of the state, the Hobbesian must provide a sound instrumental argument in favor of the sovereign limiting their actions and (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  23.  8
    Stefano Gattei (2009). Why, and to What Extent, May a False Hypothesis Yield the Truth? In Zuzana Parusniková & R. S. Cohen (eds.), Rethinking Popper. Springer 47--61.
    Some of Kepler's works seem very different in character. His youthful Mysterium cosmographicum (1596) argues for heliocentrism on the basis of metaphysical, astronomical, astrological, numerological and architectonic principles. By contrast, Astronomia nova (1609) is far more tightly argued on the basis of only a few dynamical principles. In the eyes of many, such a contrast embodies a transition from Renaissance to early modern science. I suggest that Karl Popper's fallibilist and piecemeal approach, and especially his theory of errors, might prove (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  24.  20
    Amit Lazarov, Reuven Dar, Nira Liberman & Yuval Oded (2012). Obsessive–Compulsive Tendencies May Be Associated with Attenuated Access to Internal States: Evidence From a Biofeedback-Aided Muscle Tensing Task. Consciousness and Cognition 21 (3):1401-1409.
    The present study was motivated by the hypothesis that inputs from internal states in obsessive–compulsive individuals are attenuated, which could be one source of the pervasive doubting and checking in OCD. Participants who were high or low in OC tendencies were asked to produce specific levels of muscle tension with and without biofeedback, and their accuracy in producing the required muscle tension levels was assessed. As predicted, high OC participants performed more poorly than low OC participants on this task when (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  25.  6
    Timothy F. Murphy (2002). Response to "May a Woman Clone Herself" by Jean Chambers. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 11 (1):83-86.
    For many commentators in bioethics and the law, safety is the fulcrum for evaluating the ethics of human reproductive cloning. Carson Strong has argued that if cloning were effective and safe it should be available to married couples who have tried to have children through various assisted reproductive technologies but been unable to do so. On his view, cloning should be available only as reproductive last resort. I challenged that limited use by trying to show that the arguments Strong adduces (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  26.  5
    Jean E. Chambers (2001). Response to “Entitlement to Cloning” by Timothy Murphy (CQ Vol 8, No 3) and “Cloning and Infertility” by Carson Strong (CQ Vol 7, No 3) May a Woman Clone Herself? [REVIEW] Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 10 (2):194-204.
    Carson Strong argues, in that if cloning of humans by somatic cell nuclear transfer were to become a safe procedure, then infertile couples should have access to it as a last resort. He lists six reasons such couples might desire genetically related children. Of these, two are relevant to justifying their access to cloning—namely, that they want to jointly participate in the creation of a person, and that having a genetically related child would constitute an affirmation of their mutual love. (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  27.  44
    John Bishop (2007). How a Modest Fideism May Constrain Theistic Commitments: Exploring an Alternative to Classical Theism. Philosophia 35 (3-4):387-402.
    On the assumption that theistic religious commitment takes place in the face of evidential ambiguity, the question arises under what conditions it is permissible to make a doxastic venture beyond one’s evidence in favour of a religious proposition. In this paper I explore the implications for orthodox theistic commitment of adopting, in answer to that question, a modest, moral coherentist, fideism. This extended Jamesian fideism crucially requires positive ethical evaluation of both the motivation and content of religious doxastic ventures. I (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   5 citations  
  28.  6
    Sara Irisdotter Aldenmyr (2016). What Values, Whose Perspective in Social and Emotional Training? A Study on How Ethical Approaches and Values May Be Handled Analytically in Education and Educational Research. Ethics and Education 11 (2):141-158.
    This present article takes an interest in the fairly new phenomena of social and emotional training programs in youth education. Prior research has shown that values and norms produced in these types of programs are supporting ethical systems that teachers may not always be aware of. This motivates the development of methods for analyzing these activities from an ethical point of view. An analysis model has been developed and piloted in the analyses of two different classroom activities. The model is (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  29.  5
    Sarah Banks (2010). Interprofessional Ethics: A Developing Field? Notes From the Ethics & Social Welfare Conference, Sheffield, UK, May 2010. Ethics and Social Welfare 4 (3):280-294.
    This article discusses the nature of interprofessional ethics and some of the ethical issues and challenges that arise when practitioners from different professions work closely together in the fields of health and social care. The article draws on materials from a conference on this theme, covering issues of confidentiality and information sharing in practice and research with vulnerable people; challenges for teaching and learning about ethics in interprofessional settings; the potential of virtue ethics and an ethic of care for understanding (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  30.  42
    Lauge Baungaard Rasmussen (2005). The Narrative Aspect of Scenario Building - How Story Telling May Give People a Memory of the Future. AI and Society 19 (3):229-249.
    Scenarios are flexible means to integrate disparate ideas, thoughts and feelings into holistic images, providing the context and meaning of possible futures. The application of narrative scenarios in engineering, development of socio-technical systems or communities provides an important link between general ideas and specification of technical system requirements. They focus on how people use systems through context-related storytelling rather than abstract descriptions of requirements. The quality of scenarios depends on relevant assumptions and authentic scenario stories. In this article, we will (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  31.  23
    Robert Kinscherff (2010). Proposition: A Personality Disorder May Nullify Responsibility for a Criminal Act. Journal of Law, Medicine & Ethics 38 (4):745-759.
    This article argues in support of the proposition that “A Personality Disorder May Nullify Responsibility for a Criminal Act.” Building upon research in categorical and dimensional controversies in diagnosis, neurocognitive science and the behavioral genetics of mental disorders, and difficulties in differential diagnosis and co-morbidity with personality disorders, this article holds that a per se rule barring personality diagnosis as a basis for a defense of legal insanity is scientifically and conceptually indefensible. Rather, focus should be upon the severity and (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  32.  38
    Tony Charman (2001). Understanding the Imitation Deficit in Autism May Lead to a More Specific Model of Autism as an Empathy Disorder. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 25 (1):29-30.
    Preston & de Waal are understandably cautious in applying their model to autism. They emphasise multiple cognitive impairments in autism, including prefrontal-executive, cerebellar-attention, and amygdala-emotion recognition deficits. Further empirical examination of imitation ability in autism may reveal deficits in the neural and cognitive basis of perception-action mapping that have a specific relation to the empathic deficit.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  33.  30
    Aaron Sloman, Why Some Machines May Need Qualia and How They Can Have Them (Including a Demanding New Turing Test for Robot Philosophers.).
    Many debates about consciousness appear to be endless, in part because of conceptual confusions preventing clarity as to what the issues are and what does or does not count as evidence. This makes it hard to decide what should go into a machine if it is to be described as 'conscious'. Thus, triumphant demonstrations by some AI developers may be regarded by others as proving nothing of interest because the system does not satisfy *their* definitions or requirements specifications.
    Translate
      Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  34.  47
    George Ainslie (2006). Cruelty May Be a Self-Control Device Against Sympathy. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 29 (3):224-225.
    Dispassionate cruelty and the euphoria of hunting or battle should be distinguished from the emotional savoring of victims' suffering. Such savoring, best called negative empathy, is what puzzles motivational theory. Hyperbolic discounting theory suggests that sympathy with people who have unwanted but seductive traits creates a threat to self-control. Cruelty to those people may often be the least effortful way of countering this threat.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  35.  15
    Pascal Boyer (1998). If “Tracking” is Category-Specific a “Common Structure” May Be Redundant. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 21 (1):67-68.
    Identifying objects as members of ontological domains activates category-specific processes. There is evidence that these processes include particular ways of “tracking” substances and could do all the “tracking” necessary for concept acquisition. There may be no functional need or evolutionary scenario for a general tracking capacity of the kind described by Millikan.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  36.  6
    Steven J. Brams (1982). Omniscience and Omnipotence: How They May Help - or Hurt - in a Game. Inquiry 25 (2):217 – 231.
    The concepts of omniscience and omnipotence are defined in 2 ? 2 ordinal games, and implications for the optimal play of these games, when one player is omniscient or omnipotent and the other player is aware of his omniscience or omnipotence, are derived. Intuitively, omniscience allows a player to predict the strategy choice of an opponent in advance of play, and omnipotence allows a player, after initial strategy choices are made, to continue to move after the other player is forced (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  37.  7
    Hossein Vahid Dastjerdi & Fatemeh Abbasian Borojeni (2014). A CDA Representation of the May 31, 2010 Gaza-Bound Aid Flotilla Raid: Portrayal of the Events and Actors. Pragmatics and Society 5 (1):1-21.
    News media as both a site and a process of social interaction and ideological construction (van Dijk 1993) play a unique role and carry a signifying power in structuring social thinking and disseminating social knowledge on issues related to national or international agendas, and in representing events in particular ways (Fairclough 1995). Through a comparative analysis of 30 articles from four newspapers on the events of May 31, 2010 Gaza-bound aid flotilla raid and their aftermath, the present study examined the (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  38.  5
    Pieter Bonte, Sigrid Sterckx & Guido Pennings (2014). May the Blessed Man Win: A Critique of the Categorical Preference for Natural Talent Over Doping as Proper Origins of Athletic Ability. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 39 (4):368-386.
    Doping scandals can reveal unresolved tensions between the meritocratic values of equal opportunity + reward for effort and the “talentocratic” love of hereditary privilege. Whence this special reverence for talent? We analyze the following arguments: (1) talent is a unique indicator of greater potential, whereas doping enables only temporary boosts (the fluke critique); (2) developing a talent is an authentic endeavor of “becoming who you are,” whereas reforming the fundamentals of your birth suit via artifice is an act of alienation (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  39.  7
    Bencie Woll & Jechil S. Sieratzki (2003). Why Homolaterality of Language and Hand Dominance May Not Be the Expression of a Specific Evolutionary Link. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 26 (2):241-241.
    Although gestures have surface similarities with language, there are significant organisational and neurolinguistic differences that argue against the evolutionary connection proposed by Corballis. Dominance for language and handedness may be related to a basic specialisation of the left cerebral hemisphere for target-directed behaviour and sequential processing, with the right side specialised for holistic-environmental monitoring and spatial processing.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  40.  1
    Andrew Feenberg (2009). The May 1968 Archives: A Presentation of the Anti-Technocratic Struggle in May 1968. Phaenex 4 (2):45-59.
    This essay argues that the events of May ’68 were not without substantial political content. Drawing on the May Events Archives at SFU, the author argues that the protests were not a vastly overblown student plank, but represented an important attempt to establish a politics of civilizational identity and to answer the questions: what kind of people are we, and what can we expect as a basic minimum level of justice and equality in our affairs?
    No categories
    Direct download (13 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  41.  2
    Talis Bachmann (1998). Filling-in as a Within-Level Propagation May Be an Illusion. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 21 (6):749-750.
    “Finding out” about the visual world as approached from the organismic level may well include the “filling-in” type of perceptual completion if considered in terms of underlying neurophysiological mechanisms. But “filling in” can be interpreted not only as a result of within-level propagating of neural activity, but as a byproduct of the process that is necessary for modulating preconscious information about physically present objects or events so as to generate conscious quality in attending to them.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  42. J. Carlisle (2006). Concerns Over Confidentiality May Deter Adolescents From Consulting Their Doctors. A Qualitative Exploration. Journal of Medical Ethics 32 (3):133-137.
    Objectives: Young people who are concerned that consultations may not remain confidential are reluctant to consult their doctors, especially about sensitive issues. This study sought to identify issues and concerns of adolescents, and their parents, in relation to confidentiality and teenagers’ personal health information.Setting: Recruitment was conducted in paediatric dermatology and general surgery outpatient clinics, and on general surgery paediatric wards. Interviews were conducted in subjects’ own homes.Methods: Semistructured interviews were used for this exploratory qualitative study. Interviews were carried out (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  43. Berel Lang (2011). Review: Marc Nichanian, The Historiographic Perversion and Larry May, Genocide: A Normative Account. [REVIEW] History and Theory 50:285-294.
    The two books discussed here join a current pushback against the concept of genocide. Nichanian focuses on the Armenian “Aghed” , inferring from his view of that event’s undeniability that “genocide is not a fact” . May’s critique assumes that groups don’t really—“objectively”—exist, as individuals do; thus, genocide—group murder—also has an “as if” quality so far as concerns the group victimized. On the one hand, then, uniqueness and sacralization; on the other hand, reductionism and diffusion. Alas, the historical and moral (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  44. Rivka Weinberg (2015). The Risk of a Lifetime: How, When, and Why Procreation May Be Permissible. Oxford University Press Usa.
    Having children is probably as old as the first successful organism. It is often done thoughtlessly. This book is an argument for giving procreating some serious thought, and a theory of how, when, and why procreation may be permissible.Rivka Weinberg begins with an analysis of the kind of act procreativity is and why we might be justifiably motivated to engage in it. She then proceeds to argue that, by virtue of our ownership and control of the hazardous material that is (...)
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  45. W. P. Montague (1909). May a Realist Be a Pragmatist?: IV. The Implications of Humanism and of the Pragmatic Criterion. Journal of Philosophy, Psychology and Scientific Methods 6 (21):561-571.
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  46. W. P. Montague (1909). May a Realist Be a Pragmatist?: I. The Two Doctrines Defined. Journal of Philosophy, Psychology and Scientific Methods 6 (17):460-463.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  47. W. P. Montague (1909). May a Realist Be a Pragmatist?: II. The Implications of Instrumentalism. Journal of Philosophy, Psychology and Scientific Methods 6 (18):485-490.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  48.  13
    Carson Strong (2002). Response to ???May a Woman Clone Herself???? By Jean E. Chambers (CQ Vol 10, No 2) and ???Entitlement to Cloning??? By Timothy F. Murphy (CQ Vol 8, No 3). [REVIEW] Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 11 (1):76-82.
    Jean E. Chambers and Timothy F. Murphy responded to my article “Cloning and Infertility” and extended the debate over human cloning in interesting ways. I had argued that none of the objections to cloning by somatic cell nuclear transfer are successful in the context of infertile couples who use cloning to have genetically related children, assuming the issue of safety is overcome by scientific advances.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  49.  13
    W. P. Montague (1909). May a Realist Be a Pragmatist?: III. The Implications of Psychological Pragmatism. Journal of Philosophy, Psychology and Scientific Methods 6 (20):543-548.
  50.  7
    Jos V. M. Welie (1998). May a Dentist Refuse to Treat an HIV-Positive Patient? Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 1 (2):163-169.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
1 — 50 / 1000