Search results for 'May A. Webber' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Graham Gee & Grégoire C. N. Webber (2010). What Is a Political Constitution? Oxford Journal of Legal Studies 30 (2):273-299.score: 900.0
    The question—what is a political constitution?—might seem, at first blush, fairly innocuous. At one level, the idea of a political constitution seems fairly well settled, at least insofar as most political constitutionalists subscribe to a similar set of commitments, arguments and assumptions. At a second, more reflective level, however, there remains some doubt whether a political constitution purports to be a descriptive or normative account of a real world constitution, such as Britain’s. By exploring the idea of a political constitution (...)
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  2. May A. Webber (1988). No Moral Responsibility Without Alternative Possibilities. Journal of Critical Analysis 9 (1):27-34.score: 870.0
  3. Ruth Webber & Kate Jones (2011). A Catholic Community Response to the 2009 Bushfires. Australasian Catholic Record, The 88 (3):259.score: 600.0
    Webber, Ruth; Jones, Kate This paper is about how three Catholic agencies carved out and adapted over time a role for themselves in assisting in the recovery after the Victorian bushfires of 2009. It tracks the process from the time the Archbishop of Melbourne commissioned Catholic Social Services Victoria to survey the bushfire affected areas and work out where there were gaps in services that the Catholic agencies could fill. A significant amount of funding was allocated to the provision (...)
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  4. Katherine Forbes, Eleni Miltsakaki, Rashmi Prasad, Anoop Sarkar, Aravind Joshi & Bonnie Webber (2003). D-LTAG System: Discourse Parsing with a Lexicalized Tree-Adjoining Grammar. [REVIEW] Journal of Logic, Language and Information 12 (3):261-279.score: 600.0
    We present an implementation of a discourse parsing system for alexicalized Tree-Adjoining Grammar for discourse, specifying the integrationof sentence and discourse level processing. Our system is based on theassumption that the compositional aspects of semantics at thediscourse level parallel those at the sentence level. This coupling isachieved by factoring away inferential semantics and anaphoric features ofdiscourse connectives. Computationally, this parallelism is achievedbecause both the sentence and discourse grammar are LTAG-based and the sameparser works at both levels. (...)
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  5. Susan Spronk, Jeffery R. Webber, George Ciccariello-Maher, Roland Denis, Steve Ellner, Sujatha Fernandes, Michael A. Lebowitz, Sara Motta & Thomas Purcell (2011). The Bolivarian Process in Venezuela: A Left Forum. Historical Materialism 19 (1):233-270.score: 540.0
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  6. Daniel Webber (2008). Zen and the Art of Surfboard Design. Indo-Pacific Journal of Phenomenology 8 (1).score: 450.0
    The aim of this paper is to show (a) how motion has ontological priority over space and (b) how the relationship between motion and form underpins mindness. The analysis of spatial perception reveals an interplay between spatial and temporal relations that is evident in language and surfing. Indo-Pacific Journal of Phenomenology , Volume 8, Edition 1 May 2008.
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  7. Jonathan Webber (2012). A Law Unto Oneself. Philosophical Quarterly 62 (246):170-189.score: 420.0
    We should understand the concept of self-legislation that is central to Kant's moral philosophy not in terms of the enactment of statute, but in terms of the way in which judges make law, by setting down and refining precedent through particular judgements. This paper presents a descriptive model of agency based on self-legislation so understood, and argues that we can read Kant's normative ethics as based on this view of agency. It is intended to contribute to contemporary debates in moral (...)
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  8. Deborah Swiderski, Katharine Ettinger, Mayris Webber & Nancy Dubler (2010). The Clinical Ethics Credentialing Project: Preliminary Notes From a Pilot Project to Establish Quality Measures for Ethics Consultation. [REVIEW] HEC Forum 22 (1):65-72.score: 420.0
    The Clinical Ethics Credentialing Project (CECP) was intiated in 2007 in response to the lack of uniform standards for both the training of clinical ethics consultants, and for evaluating their work as consultants. CECP participants, all practicing clinical ethics consultants, met monthly to apply a standard evaluation instrument, the QI tool , to their consultation notes. This paper describes, from a qualitative perspective, how participants grappled with applying standards to their work. Although the process was marked by resistance and disagreement, (...)
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  9. Marcos André Webber (2013). BAERTSCHI, Bernard. Ensaio filosófico sobre a dignidade. Conjectura: Filosofia E Educação 18.score: 360.0
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  10. Jack A. Adams & Carl E. Webber (1961). The Organization of Component Response Error Events in Two-Dimensional Visual Tracking. Journal of Experimental Psychology 61 (3):200.score: 280.0
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  11. Peter Kroes, Pieter E. Vermaas, Andrew Light, Steven A. Moore & Rebecca Webber (2008). Expert Culture, Representation, and Public Choice: Architectural Renderings as the Editing of Reality. In Pieter E. Vermaas, Peter Kroes, Andrew Light & Steven A. Moore (eds.), Philosophy and Design: From Engineering to Architecture. Springer.score: 280.0
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  12. P. J. Wilson, C. Meier & A. Webber (1995). The Political Art of Greek Tragedy. Journal of Hellenic Studies 115:187.score: 240.0
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  13. Jonathan Webber (2006). Virtue, Character and Situation. Journal of Moral Philosophy 3 (2):193-213.score: 120.0
    Philosophers have recently argued that traditional discussions of virtue and character presuppose an account of behaviour that experimental psychology has shown to be false. Behaviour does not issue from global traits such as prudence, temperance, courage or fairness, they claim, but from local traits such as sailing-in-rough-weather-with-friends-courage and office-party-temperance. The data employed provides evidence for this view only if we understand it in the light of a behaviourist construal of traits in terms of stimulus and response, rather than in the (...)
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  14. Jonathan Webber (2002). Doing Without Representation: Coping with Dreyfus. Philosophical Explorations 5 (1):82-88.score: 120.0
    Hubert Dreyfus argues that the traditional and currently dominant conception of an action, as an event initiated or governed by a mental representation of a possible state of affairs that the agent is trying to realise, is inadequate. If Dreyfus is right, then we need a new conception of action. I argue, however, that the considerations that Dreyfus adduces show only that an action need not be initiated or governed by a conceptual representation, but since a representation need not be (...)
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  15. Jonathan Webber & Robin Scaife (2013). Intentional Side-Effects of Action. Journal of Moral Philosophy 10 (2):179-203.score: 120.0
    Recent empirical research into the folk classification of the outcomes of actions as intentional is usually taken to show that such classification has an irreducibly normative dimension. Various interpretations of the experimental data have in common the claim that whether the side-effect of an action counts as intentional depends on some normative valence of that side-effect.1 This is the way that Joshua Knobe, for example, whose experimental research started this debate, understands the data. Some critics of this view claim the (...)
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  16. Jonathan Webber (2007). Character, Global and Local. Utilitas 19 (4):430-434.score: 120.0
    Philosophers have recently argued that we should revise our understanding of character. An individual’s behaviour is governed not by a set of ‘global’ traits, each elicited by a certain kind of situational feature, but by a much larger array of ‘local’ traits, each elicited by a certain combination of situational features. The data cited by these philosophers supports their theory only if we conceive of traits purely in terms of stimulus and response, rather than in the more traditional terms of (...)
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  17. Jonathan Webber (forthcoming). Sartre's Critique of Husserl. In Sofia Miguens Travis, Clara Morando & Gerhard Preyer (eds.), Prereflective Consciousness: Early Sartre in the Context of Contemporary Philosophy of Mind.score: 120.0
    Sartre provides no detailed definitive statement of his critical appropriation of Husserl’s method of phenomenology, making it unclear whether his scattered comments on Husserl and on phenomenology as a philosophical method amount to a coherent position. Having employed the phenomenological reduction in early works, for example, he argues in Being and Nothingness that it leads Husserl astray, yet continues to hold positions derived from its employment in those earlier works. His argument against Husserl’s theory of the transcendental ego seems to (...)
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  18. Jonathan Webber (2010). Existentialism. In John Skorupski (ed.), The Routledge Companion to Ethics. Routledge.score: 120.0
    Since it gained currency at the end of the second world war, the term “existentialism” has mostly been associated with a cultural movement that grew out of the wartime intellectual atmosphere of the Left Bank in Paris and spread through fiction and art as much as philosophy. The theoretical and other writings of Jean-Paul Sartre, Simone de Beauvoir, Albert Camus, and Frantz Fanon in the 1940s and 1950s are usually taken as central to this movement, as are the sculptures of (...)
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  19. Jonathan Webber (2011). Freedom. In Sebastian Luft & Søren Overgaard (eds.), The Routledge Companion to Phenomenology. Routledge.score: 120.0
    Human freedom was Jean-Paul Sartre’s central philosophical preoccupation throughout his career. It is hardly surprising, therefore, that the cornerstone of his moral and political thought, Being and Nothingness, contains an extensive and subtle account of the metaphysical freedom that he considered fundamental to the kind of existence that humans have. Although rooted in phenomenology, Sartre’s account of freedom draws very little on analysis of the experience of freedom itself. It is rather based on a general phenomenological account of perceptual experience (...)
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  20. Jonathan Webber (2007). Character, Common-Sense, and Expertise. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 10 (1):89 - 104.score: 120.0
    Gilbert Harman has argued that the common-sense characterological psychology employed in virtue ethics is rooted not in unbiased observation of close acquaintances, but rather in the ‘fundamental attribution error’. If this is right, then philosophers cannot rely on their intuitions for insight into characterological psychology, and it might even be that there is no such thing as character. This supports the idea, urged by John Doris and Stephen Stich, that we should rely exclusively on experimental psychology for our explanations of (...)
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  21. Jonathan Webber (2010). Bad Faith and the Other. In , Reading Sartre: On Phenomenology and Existentialism. Routledge.score: 120.0
    Nothingness , is his use of extended narrative vignettes that immediately resound with the reader’s own experience yet are intended to illustrate, perhaps also to support, complex and controversial theoretical claims about the structures of conscious experience and the shape of the human condition. Among the best known of these are his description of Parisian café waiters, who somehow contrive to caricature themselves, and his analysis of feeling shame upon being caught spying through a keyhole. There is some disagreement among (...)
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  22. Jonathan Webber (2006). Character, Consistency, and Classification. Mind 115 (459):651-658.score: 120.0
    John Doris has recently argued that since we do not possess character traits as traditionally conceived, virtue ethics is rooted in a false empirical presupposition. Gopal Sreenivasan has claimed, in a paper in Mind, that Doris has not provided suitable evidence for his empirical claim. But the experiment Sreenivasan focuses on is not one that Doris employs, and neither is it relevantly similar in structure. The confusion arises because both authors use the phrase ‘cross-situational consistency’ to describe the aspect of (...)
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  23. Jonathan Webber (2006). Sartre's Theory of Character. European Journal of Philosophy 14 (1):94–116.score: 120.0
    Various ethical theories recommend developing a morally sound character, and therefore require an understanding of the nature and development of traits. Philosophers usually accept the Aristotelian view that traits are a combination of habit and insight. Sartre’s early work offers an alternative: traits consist in projects. One aim of this paper is to show that this is indeed Sartre’s view, by explaining the errors that have lead philosophers to ignore his theory of character or deny that he has one. The (...)
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  24. Jonathan Webber (forthcoming). Instilling Virtue. In Alberto Masala & Jonathan Webber (eds.), From Personality to Virtue.score: 120.0
    Two debates in contemporary philosophical moral psychology have so far been conducted almost entirely in isolation from one another despite their structural similarity. One is the debate over the importance for virtue ethics of the results of situational manipulation experiments in social psychology. The other is the debate over the ethical implications of experiments that reveal gender and race biases in social cognition. In both cases, the ethical problem posed cannot be identified without first clarifying the cognitive structures underlying the (...)
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  25. Jonathan Webber (2013). Cultivating Virtue. In Havi Carel & Darian Meacham (eds.), Phenomenology and Naturalism. Cambridge University Press. 239-259.score: 120.0
    Ought you to cultivate your own virtue? Various philosophers have argued that there is something suspect about directing one’s ethical attention towards oneself in this way. These arguments can be divided between those that deem aiming at virtue for its own sake to be narcissistic and those that consider aiming at virtue for the sake of good behaviour to involve a kind of doublethink. Underlying them all is the assumption that epistemic access to one’s own character requires an external point (...)
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  26. Jonathan Webber (2011). There Is Something About Inez. Think (27):45-56.score: 120.0
    Hell is other people. This miserable-sounding soundbite, the moment of revelation in Jean- Paul Sartre’s shortest play, must be the most quoted line of twentieth-century philosophy. Not even Jacques Derrida’s claim that ‘there is nothing beyond the text’, fondly cherished in some regions of academia, has anything like the cultural reach of what is often taken to be the quintessential Sartrean slogan. And the analytic tradition hardly abounds in snappy lines: meaning just ain’t in the head, to be is to (...)
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  27. Jonathan Webber (2010). Character. The Philosophers' Magazine (50):112-113.score: 120.0
    ‘Of all the difficulties which impede the progress of thought and the formation of well- grounded opinions on life and social arrangements’, wrote John Stuart Mill around 150 years ago, ‘the greatest is now the unspeakable ignorance and inattention of mankind in respect of the influences which form character’. Aristotle is never far in the background of Mill’s moral and political philosophy, a presence weightier than Jeremy Bentham’s in the foreground. That this is often overlooked is not only because thinkers (...)
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  28. Jonathan Webber (2011). Virtue and Vice in the Hurt Locker. Dialogue (37).score: 120.0
    Much of the critical praise for the film concerns the first of these aims. Bigelow’s use of at least four film crews for every scene affords the sense of being present in the situation, continuously shifting perspective, alert to possible danger. The relative anonymity of the scenery, clearly somewhere in the Middle East but not clearly anywhere in particular, fosters this uneasy sense of immersion in an unfamiliar scenario where the sources of danger are unpredictable. Protracted periods of silence, punctuated (...)
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  29. Jonathan Webber (2009). Reconstructing Alfie. The Philosophers' Magazine (47):61-66.score: 120.0
    Good stories tend to get told and retold, over and over again, mutating in the process. They adapt to different times and places, taking on and sloughing off embellishments as they are handed on. They persist through a kind of evolution. This is how it has always been and how it must be. Tales cannot survive otherwise. But this does not mean that all mutations are equally acceptable. For critical discussion is part of the environment in which stories survive. So (...)
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  30. Bonnie Webber, Anaphora and Discourse Structure.score: 120.0
    We argue in this article that many common adverbial phrases generally taken to signal a discourse relation between syntactically connected units within discourse structure instead work anaphor- ically to contribute relational meaning, with only indirect dependence on discourse structure. This allows a simpler discourse structure to provide scaffolding for compositional semantics and reveals multiple ways in which the relational meaning conveyed by adverbial connectives can interact with that associated with discourse structure. We conclude by sketching (...)
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  31. Herbert H. Clark & Catherine R. Marshall (1981). Definite Reference and Mutual Knowledge In Aravind K. Joshi, Bonnie L. Webber, and Ivan A. Sag, Editors. In A. Joshi, Bruce H. Weber & Ivan A. Sag (eds.), Elements of Discourse Understanding. Cambridge University Press.score: 120.0
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  32. Paget Henry (2010). A.R.E Webber: Between Ariel and Caliban. Clr James Journal 16 (1):243-250.score: 120.0
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  33. Matthew Stone Bonnie Webber, Textual Economy Through Close Coupling of Syntax and Semantics.score: 120.0
    We focus on the production of efficient descriptions of objects, actions and events. We define a type of efficiency, textual economy, that exploits the hearer’s recognition of inferential links to material elsewhere within a sentence. Textual economy leads to efficient descriptions because the material that supports such inferences has been included to satisfy independent communicative goals, and is therefore overloaded in the sense of Pollack [18]. We argue that achieving textual economy imposes strong requirements on the representation and reasoning used (...)
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  34. Gopal Sreenivasan (2008). Character and Consistency: Still More Errors. Mind 117 (467):603-612.score: 81.0
    This paper continues a debate among philosophers concerning the implications of situationist experiments in social psychology for the theory of virtue. In a previous paper (2002), I argued among other things that the sort of character trait problematized by Hartshorne and May's (1928) famous study of honesty is not the right sort to trouble the theory of virtue. Webber (2006) criticizes my argument, alleging that it founders on an ambiguity in "cross-situational consistency" and that Milgram's (1974) obedience experiment is (...)
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  35. Jonathan B. King (1993). Learning to Solve the Right Problems: The Case of Nuclear Power in America. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 12 (2):105 - 116.score: 81.0
    Three general types of problems entail different strategies. Continuing to seek solutions to tame problems when we face messes, let alone wicked problems, is potentially catastrophic hence fundamentally irresponsible. In our turbulent times, it is therefore becoming a strategic necessity to learn how to solve the right problems. Successful problem solving requires finding the right solution to the right problem. We fail more often because we solve the wrong problem than because we get the wrong solution to the right problem. (...)
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  36. M. Swiderski Deborah, M. Ettinger Katharine, Nancy Mayris Webber & N. Dubler (2010). The Clinical Ethics Credentialing Project: Preliminary Notes From a Pilot Project to Establish Quality Measures for Ethics Consultation. HEC Forum 22 (1).score: 42.0
    The Clinical Ethics Credentialing Project (CECP) was intiated in 2007 in response to the lack of uniform standards for both the training of clinical ethics consultants, and for evaluating their work as consultants. CECP participants, all practicing clinical ethics consultants, met monthly to apply a standard evaluation instrument, the “QI tool”, to their consultation notes. This paper describes, from a qualitative perspective, how participants grappled with applying standards to their work. Although the process was marked by resistance and disagreement, it (...)
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  37. Jean-Paul Sartre (2004). The Imaginary: A Phenomenological Psychology of the Imagination. Routledge.score: 36.0
    Webber's perceptive new introduction helps to decipher this challenging, seminal work, placing it in the context of the author's work and the history of ...
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  38. R. A. B. Mynors (1940). Classical and Mediaeval Studies in Honor of Edward Kennard Rand. Edited by Leslie Webber Jones. Pp. X+310; 6 Plates. New York: Published by the Editor (Butler Hall, 400 West 119th Street), 1938. Cloth, $4.50 Post-Free. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 54 (03):155-156.score: 36.0
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  39. Diana McKinley & Webber (2012). Important Aspects of Catholic Identity for Committed Generations X and Y Catholics. Australasian Catholic Record, The 89 (3):322.score: 30.0
    McKinley, Diana; Webber, Ruth This paper is an ecclesial study of the baptismal response of twenty-three Catholics between the ages of twenty-one and forty-one, from six Catholic dioceses across Australia. The study was undertaken between 2008 and 2010. The purpose of the study was to investigate how committed Catholics from Generation X (born 1961-1975) and Generation Y (born 1976-1990) came to faith, and why they continued to practise their Catholic faith, despite falling Mass attendance generally. An unexpected result of (...)
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  40. Isabel Gómez Txurruka (2003). The Natural Language Conjunction And. Linguistics and Philosophy 26 (3):255-285.score: 24.0
    In the first part of this article, we show that, contrary to the Gricean tradition, inter-clausal and is not semantically equivalent to logical conjunction and, contrary to temporal approaches such as Bar-Levand Palacas 1980, it is not temporallyloaded. We then explore a commonsenseidea – namely that while sentence juxtaposition might be interpreted either as discourse coordination or subordination, and indicates coordination. SDRT already includes notions of coordinating and subordinating discourse relations (cf. Lascarides and Asher 1993, Asher 1993), and the meaning (...)
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  41. Maria Bittner, Tense as Temporal Centering.score: 24.0
    Abstract According to an influential theory, English tenses are anaphoric to an aforementioned reference point. This point is sometimes construed as a time (e.g. Reichenbach 1947, Partee 1973, Stone 1997) and sometimes as an event (e.g. Kamp 1979, 1981, Webber 1988). Moreover, some researchers draw semantic parallels between tenses and pronouns (e.g. Partee 1973, 1984, Stone 1997), whereas others draw parallels between tenses and anaphorically anchored (in)definite descriptions (e.g.
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  42. Bryan G. Norton (2012). The Ways of Wickedness: Analyzing Messiness with Messy Tools. [REVIEW] Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 25 (4):447-465.score: 24.0
    The revelatory paper, “Dilemmas in the General Theory of Planning,” by Rittel and Webber (Policy Sci 4:155–169, 1973 ) has had great impact because it provides one example of an emergent consensus across many disciplines. Many “problems,” as addressed in real-world situations, involve elements that exceed the complexity of any known or hoped-for model, or are “wicked.” Many who encounter this work for the first time find that their concept of wicked problems aptly describes many environmental disputes. For those (...)
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