Search results for 'Meaning in Life' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Thaddeus Metz (2013). Meaning in Life as the Aim of Psychotherapy: A Hypothesis. In Joshua Hicks & Clay Routledge (eds.), The Experience of Meaning in Life: Classical Perspectives, Emerging Themes, and Controversies. Springer. 405-17.score: 150.0
    The point of psychotherapy has occasionally been associated with talk of ‘life’s meaning’. However, the literature on meaning in life written by contemporary philosophers has yet to be systematically applied to literature on the point of psychotherapy. My broad aim in this chapter is to indicate some plausible ways to merge these two tracks of material that have run in parallel up to now. More specifically, my hunch is that the connection between meaning as philosophers (...)
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  2. Deborah Bruce†, Cynthia Woolever, R. David Hayward & Neal Krause (2013). Church Involvement, Spiritual Growth, Meaning in Life, and Health. Archive for the Psychology of Religion 35 (2):169-191.score: 150.0
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  3. Neal Krause, R. David Hayward, Deborah Bruce† & Cynthia Woolever (2013). Church Involvement, Spiritual Growth, Meaning in Life, and Health. Archive for the Psychology of Religion 35 (2):169-191.score: 150.0
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  4. Thaddeus Metz (forthcoming). How to Obtain Meaning in Life: The Roles of Self-Inflation, Self-Deception and World-Delusion. Philosophical Psychology.score: 148.0
    Part of a special Issue on Robert Trivers’ The Folly of Fools: The Logic of Deceit and Self‐Deception in Human Life, with some focus on the implication of self-deception and related mental states for meaning in life.
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  5. Henk van den Belt (2009). Playing God in Frankenstein's Footsteps: Synthetic Biology and the Meaning of Life. [REVIEW] Nanoethics 3 (3):257-268.score: 144.0
    The emergent new science of synthetic biology is challenging entrenched distinctions between, amongst others, life and non-life, the natural and the artificial, the evolved and the designed, and even the material and the informational. Whenever such culturally sanctioned boundaries are breached, researchers are inevitably accused of playing God or treading in Frankenstein’s footsteps. Bioethicists, theologians and editors of scientific journals feel obliged to provide an authoritative answer to the ambiguous question of the ‘meaning’ of life, both (...)
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  6. David Guttmann (2008). Finding Meaning in Life, at Midlife and Beyond: Wisdom and Spirit From Logotherapy. Praeger.score: 144.0
    On old age that steals on us fast -- Spiritual development -- The search for happiness -- Meaningful living according to logotherapy -- Guiding principles of logotherapy -- The courage to be authentic : philosophical sources of logotherapy -- The concept of meaning in religion and literature -- Life as a task -- On fate and meaningful living -- Despair as mortal illness in aging -- The gifts of the Gods : sources for discovering meaning in (...) -- The importance of humor and laughter in old age -- Dealing with guilt and remorse -- Coping with loneliness -- A logotherapeutic perspective on death. (shrink)
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  7. Aaron Smuts (2013). The Good Cause Account of the Meaning of Life. Southern Journal of Philosophy 51 (4):536-562.score: 131.0
    I defend the theory that one's life is meaningful to the extent that one promotes the good. Call this the good cause account (GCA) of the meaning of life. It holds that the good effects that count towards the meaning of one's life need not be intentional. Nor must one be aware of the effects. Nor does it matter whether the same good would have resulted if one had not existed. What matters is that one (...)
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  8. Aaron Smuts (2012). It's a Wonderful Life: Pottersville and the Meaning of Life. Film and Philosophy 16 (1):15-33.score: 129.0
    It’s a Wonderful Life (Capra, 1946) presents a plausible theory of the meaning of life: One's life is meaningful to the extent that it promotes the good. Although this theory is credible, the movie suggests a problematic refinement in the Pottersville sequence. George's waking nightmare asks us to compare the actual world with a world where he did not exist. It tells us that we are only responsible for the good that would not exist had we (...)
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  9. Thaddeus Metz (2013). Meaning in Life: An Analytic Study. Oxford University Press.score: 120.0
    What makes a person's life meaningful? Thaddeus Metz offers a new answer to an ancient question which has recently returned to the philosophical agenda. He proceeds by examining what, if anything, all the conditions that make a life meaningful have in common. The outcome of this process is a philosophical theory of meaning in life. He starts by evaluating existing theories in terms of the classic triad of the good, the true, and the beautiful. He considers (...)
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  10. Derk Pereboom (2002). Meaning in Life Without Free Will. Philosophic Exchange 33:19-34.score: 120.0
    In a recent article Gary Watson instructively distinguishes two faces or aspects of responsibility. The first is the self-disclosing sense, which is concerned centrally with aretaic or excellence-relevant evaluations of agents. An agent is responsible for an action in this respect when it is an action that is inescapably the agent’s own, if, as a declaration of her adopted ends, it expresses what the agent is about, her identity as an agent. An action for which the agent is responsible in (...)
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  11. Thaddeus Metz (2011). The Good, the True and the Beautiful: Toward a Unified Account of Great Meaning in Life. Religious Studies 47 (4):389-409.score: 120.0
    Three of the great sources of meaning in life are the good, the true, and the beautiful, and I aim to make headway on the grand Enlightenment project of ascertaining what, if anything, they have in common. Concretely, if we take a (stereotypical) Mother Teresa, Mandela, Darwin, Einstein, Dostoyevsky, and Picasso, what might they share that makes it apt to deem their lives to have truly mattered? I provide reason to doubt two influential answers, noting a common flaw (...)
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  12. Simon Derpmann (2012). Susan Wolf, Meaning in Life and Why It Matters. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 15 (3):421-422.score: 120.0
    Susan Wolf, Meaning in Life and Why it Matters Content Type Journal Article Pages 1-2 DOI 10.1007/s10677-011-9321-8 Authors Simon Derpmann, Westfälische Wilhelms-Universität Münster, Philosophisches Seminar, Domplatz 23, 48143 Münster, Germany Journal Ethical Theory and Moral Practice Online ISSN 1572-8447 Print ISSN 1386-2820.
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  13. Derk Pereboom (2014). Free Will, Agency, and Meaning in Life. Oup Oxford.score: 120.0
    Derk Pereboom articulates and defends an original, forward-looking conception of moral responsibility. He argues that although we may not possess the kind of free will that is normally considered necessary for moral responsibility, this does not jeopardize our sense of ourselves as agents, or a robust sense of achievement and meaning in life.
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  14. Larry D. Harwood (1997). The View From Nowhere and the Meaning of Life in Thomas Nagel. Philosophy in the Contemporary World 4 (3):19-23.score: 119.0
    Thomas Nagel contends that the actual philosophical problem in the meaning of life is the independent world we live in, and only requires a self-transcendent being who glimpses an independent world. I argue that Nagel is mistaken to think that self-transcendence evokes the same anxiety for humans living in the world of Dante as Darwin. Nagel’s view from nowhere is rather a modem version of the world. Secondly, while I concede that there is a common anxiety felt by (...)
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  15. Thaddeus Metz (2007). New Developments in the Meaning of Life. Philosophy Compass 2 (2):196–217.score: 117.0
    In this article I survey philosophical literature on the topic of what, if anything, makes a person’s life meaningful, focusing on systematic texts that are written in English and that have appeared in the last five years (2002-2007). My aims are to present overviews of the most important, fresh, Anglo-American positions on meaning in life and to raise critical questions about them worth answering in future work.
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  16. Alan Holland (2009). Darwin and the Meaning in Life. Environmental Values 18 (4):503 - 518.score: 117.0
    It has often been thought, and has recently been argued, that one of the most profound impacts of Darwin's theory of evolution is the threat that it poses to the very possibility of living a meaningful, and therefore worthwhile, life. Three attempts to ground the possibility of a meaningful life are considered. The first two are compatible with an exclusively Darwinian worldview. One is based on the belief that Darwinian evolution is, in some sense, progressive; the other is (...)
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  17. Costica Bradatan (2011). On the Meaning of Life in the Age of the Most Meaningless Death. Angelaki 15 (3):67-85.score: 116.0
    (2010). On the Meaning of Life in the age of the Most Meaningless Death. Angelaki: Vol. 15, The Unbearable Charm of Fragility Philosophizing in/on Eastern Europe, pp. 67-85.
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  18. A. L. Herman (1991). Jivacide, Zombies and Jivanmuktas: The Meaning of Life in the Bhagavad Git. Asian Philosophy 1 (1):5 – 13.score: 116.0
    Abstract In discussing the meaning of life in the Bhagavad Git? two obvious questions arise: first, what is the meaning of ?the meaning of life'?, and second, how does that meaning apply to the Bhagavad Git?? In Part I of this brief paper I will attempt to answer the first question by focusing on one of the common meanings of that phrase; in Part II, I will apply that very common meaning to the (...)
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  19. Xize Deng (2011). On the Problem of the Meaning of Life in “Chinese Philosophy”. Frontiers of Philosophy in China 6 (4):609-627.score: 110.0
    The goal of “(modern) Chinese Philosophy” established during the period of the May 4th Movement is to reestablish the meaning of life for Chinese people. However, because it takes the approach of interpreting Chinese thinking through a Western lens, thus forming a discourse pattern of “Chinese A is Western B,” which is only capable of manifesting Western culture, “Chinese Philosophy” is made logically impossible as the ideological source from which modern Chinese thinkers could construct the meaning of (...)
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  20. Alice Woolley (2014). Context, Meaning and Morality in the Life of the Lawyer. Legal Ethics 17 (1):1-22.score: 108.0
    Legal ethics theory focuses on the moral problem of lawyers pursuing morally suspect (but lawful) ends and using morally suspect (but lawful) means. It considers possible justifications for lawyers' conduct arising from moral or political philosophy, and how those justifications may require shifts in the lawyer's role. This paper argues that legal ethics theory needs to expand its focus to consider other ethical aspects of the lawyer's role and, in particular, the extent to which being a lawyer can complicate, or (...)
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  21. Neil Levy (2005). Downshifting and Meaning in Life. Ratio 18 (2):176–189.score: 102.0
    So-called downshifters seek more meaningful lives by decreasing the amount of time they devote to work, leaving more time for the valuable goods of friendship, family and personal development. But though these are indeed meaning-conferring activities, they do not have the right structure to count as superlatively meaningful. Only in work – of a certain kind – can superlative meaning be found. It is by active engagements in projects, which are activities of the right structure, dedicated to the (...)
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  22. Ulrich Diehl, Human Suffering as a Challenge for the Meaning of Life. Existenz. An International Journal in Philosophy, Religion, Politics, and the Arts.score: 102.0
    When people suffer they always suffer as a whole human being. The emotional, cognitive and spiritual suffering of human beings cannot be completely separated from all other kinds of suffering, such as from harmful natural, ecological, political, economic and social conditions. In reality they interact with each other and influence each other. Human beings do not only suffer from somatic illnesses, physical pain, and the lack of decent opportunities to satisfy their basic vital, social and emotional needs. They also suffer (...)
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  23. Nikolay Milkov (2005). The Meaning of Life: A Topological Approach. Analecta Husserliana 84:217–34.score: 99.0
    In parts of his Notebooks, Tractatus and in “Lecture on Ethics”, Wittgenstein advanced a new approach to the problems of the meaning of life. It was developed as a reaction to the explorations on this theme by Bertrand Russell. Wittgenstein’s objective was to treat it with a higher degree of exactness. The present paper shows that he reached exactness by treating themes of philosophical anthropology using the formal method of topology.
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  24. Roy W. Perrett (2010). Ineffability, Signification and the Meaning of Life. Philosophical Papers 39 (2):239-255.score: 99.0
    There is an apparent tension between two familiar platitudes about the meaning of life: (i) that 'meaning' in this context means 'value', and (ii) that such meaning might be ineffable. I suggest a way of trying to bring these two claims together by focusing on an ideal of a meaningful life that fuses both the axiological and semantic senses of 'significant'. This in turn allows for the possibility that the full significance of a life (...)
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  25. John E. Stewart (2010). The Meaning of Life in a Developing Universe. Foundations of Science 15 (4):395-409.score: 99.0
    The evolution of life on Earth has produced an organism that is beginning to model and understand its own evolution and the possible future evolution of life in the universe. These models and associated evidence show that evolution on Earth has a trajectory. The scale over which living processes are organized cooperatively has increased progressively, as has its evolvability. Recent theoretical advances raise the possibility that this trajectory is itself part of a wider developmental process. According to these (...)
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  26. Dan Weijers (2014). Optimistic Naturalism: Scientific Advancement and the Meaning of Life. Sophia 53 (1):1-18.score: 99.0
    Naturalist theories of the meaning of life are sometimes criticised for not setting the bar high enough for what counts as a meaningful life. Tolstoy’s version of this criticism is that Naturalist theories do not describe really meaningful lives because they do not require that we connect our finite lives with the infinite. Another criticism of Naturalist theories is that they cannot adequately resolve the Absurd—the vast difference between how meaningful our actions and lives appear from subjective (...)
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  27. Thaddeus Metz (2014). Meaning as a Distinct and Fundamental Value: Reply to Kershnar. Science, Religion and Culture 1 (2):101-106.score: 99.0
    In this article, I reply to a critical notice of my book, Meaning in Life: An Analytic Study, that Stephen Kershnar has published elsewhere in this issue of Science, Religion & Culture. Beyond expounding the central conclusions of the book, Kershnar advances two major criticisms of it, namely, first, that I did not provide enough evidence that meaning in life is a genuine value-theoretic category as something distinct from and competing with, say, objective well-being, and, second, (...)
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  28. Terry Eagleton (2007). The Meaning of Life. Oxford University Press.score: 96.0
    The phrase "the meaning of life" for many seems a quaint notion fit for satirical mauling by Monty Python or Douglas Adams. But in this spirited, stimulating, and quirky enquiry, famed critic Terry Eagleton takes a serious if often amusing look at the question and offers his own surprising answer. Eagleton first examines how centuries of thinkers and writers--from Marx and Schopenhauer to Shakespeare, Sartre, and Beckett--have responded to the ultimate question of meaning. He suggests, however, that (...)
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  29. William J. F. Keenan & Tatjana Schnell (2011). Meaning-Making in an Atheist World. Archive for the Psychology of Religion 33 (1):55-78.score: 96.0
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  30. Tatjana Schnell & William J. F. Keenan (2011). Meaning-Making in an Atheist World. Archive for the Psychology of Religion 33 (1):55-78.score: 96.0
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  31. Deng Xize (2011). On the Problem of the Meaning of Life in “Chinese Philosophy”. Frontiers of Philosophy in China 6 (4):609-627.score: 96.0
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  32. Michael Macnamara (ed.) (1977). Meaning in Life. Ad. Donker.score: 96.0
     
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  33. Julian Baggini (2005). What's It All About?: Philosophy and the Meaning of Life. Oxford University Press.score: 95.0
    What is the meaning of life? It is a question that has intrigued the great philosophers--and has been hilariously lampooned by Monty Python. Indeed, the whole idea strikes many of us as vaguely pompous, a little absurd. Is there one profound and mysterious meaning to life, a single ultimate purpose behind human existence? In What's It All About?, Julian Baggini says no, there is no single meaning. Instead, Baggini argues meaning can be found in (...)
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  34. John Cottingham (2003). On the Meaning of Life. Routledge.score: 95.0
    The question "What is the meaning of life?" is one of the most fascinating, oldest and most difficult questions human beings have ever posed themselves. Often linked to the religious issue of whether we are part of a larger, divine scheme, even in an increasingly secularized culture it remains a question to which we are ineluctably and powerfully drawn. In this acute and thoughtful book, John Cottingham asks why the question vexes us so much and assesses some of (...)
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  35. Julian Young (2003). The Death of God and the Meaning of Life. Routledge.score: 95.0
    What is the meaning of life? In the post-modern, post-religious scientific world, this question is becoming a preoccupation. But it also has a long history: many major figures in philosophy had something to say on the subject. This book begins with an historical overview of philosophers from Plato to Hegel and Marx who have believed in some sort of meaning of life, either in some supposed "other" world or in the future of this world. Young goes (...)
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  36. Terry Eagleton (2008). The Meaning of Life: A Very Short Introduction. Oxford University Press.score: 95.0
    The phrase "the meaning of life" for many seems a quaint notion fit for satirical mauling by Monty Python or Douglas Adams. But in this spirited Very Short Introduction, famed critic Terry Eagleton takes a serious if often amusing look at the question and offers his own surprising answer. Eagleton first examines how centuries of thinkers and writers--from Marx and Schopenhauer to Shakespeare, Sartre, and Beckett--have responded to the ultimate question of meaning. He suggests, however, that it (...)
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  37. Thaddeus Metz (2013). 'The Meaning of Life Lies in the Search': Robert Kane's New Justification of Objective Values. Social Theory and Practice 39 (2):313-27.score: 93.0
    Part of Robert Kane’s response to the contemporary cultural condition of pluralism is to attempt to ground morality in the _search_ for wisdom about how to live. With regard to the right, Kane argues, roughly, that a new principle capturing what all morally permissible actions have in common warrants belief on the part of all inquirers, even in the face of reasonable uncertainty, because it is justified as an essential means to ascertaining wisdom. Upon embarking for wisdom, one quickly discovers (...)
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  38. Jukka Varelius (2012). Ending Life, Morality, and Meaning. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 16 (3):559-574.score: 93.0
    Opponents of voluntary euthanasia and physician-assisted suicide often maintain that the procedures ought not to be accepted because ending an innocent human life would both be morally wrong in itself and have unfortunate consequences. A gravely suffering patient can grant that ending his life would involve such harm but still insist that he would have reason to continue living only if there were something to him in his abstaining from ending his life. Though relatively rarely, the notion (...)
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  39. Iddo Landau (2013). Conceptualizing Great Meaning in Life: Metz on the Good, the True, and the Beautiful. Religious Studies 49 (4):505-514.score: 93.0
    This article is a reply to Thaddeus Metz's (2011). I suggest that Metz's theory is too broad since it entails that merely understanding Einstein's or Darwin's views can make a life highly meaningful. Furthermore, it is unclear whether , toward which highly meaningful lives are oriented, may or may not be necessary conditions to , how completely the former should explain the latter, and whether Metz's account is indeed non-consequentialist. While acknowledging the importance of Metz's contribution, I consider alternative (...)
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  40. Eric Dowling (1995). Love, Passion, Action: The Meaning of Love and its Place in Life. Australian Scholarly Pub..score: 93.0
  41. Ephraim Katzir (1989). The Meaning of Life as Represented in the Life Sciences and the Jewish Heritage. Kaplan Centre, University of Cape Town.score: 93.0
     
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  42. Jason Burke Murphy (2010). Betting on Life: A Pascalian Argument for Seeking to Discover Meaning. The Monist 31 (1):136-141.score: 91.0
    I seek to step back from the discussion of what it is that confers meaning and concentrate rather on the issue of our reasons to search for meaning. I seek to show that we always have reason to search for meaning, and that this is the case even if we are in a crisis that has rendered us ignorant of what it is that could make the rest of our life worthwhile. Consider: even if presented with (...)
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  43. Derk Pereboom (2011). Free Will Skepticism and Meaning in Life. In Robert Kane (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of Free Will. Oxford University Press.score: 90.0
  44. Philip Ball (2010). Making Life: A Comment on 'Playing God in Frankenstein's Footsteps: Synthetic Biology and the Meaning of Life' by Henk van den Belt (2009). Nanoethics 4 (2):129-132.score: 90.0
    Van den Belt recently examined the notion that synthetic biology and the creation of ‘artificial’ organisms are examples of scientists ‘playing God’. Here I respond to some of the issues he raises, including some of his comments on my previous discussions of the value of the term ‘life’ as a scientific concept.
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  45. A. C. Baier (2012). Meaning in Life and Why It Matters, by Susan Wolf, with an Introduction by Stephen Macedo, Comments by John Koethe, Robert M. Adams, Nomy Arpaly, and Jonathan Haidt, and Responses by Susan Wolf. Mind 120 (480):1330-1331.score: 90.0
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  46. Nicole Note (2011). Susan Wolf, The Meaning in Life and Why It Matters. Journal of Value Inquiry 45 (4):477-482.score: 90.0
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  47. Franc Rottiers (2012). Participating in the Meaning of Life, a Contributor's Critique. Foundations of Science 17 (1):39-41.score: 90.0
    The aim of this contribution is to critically examine the metaphysical presuppositions that prevail in (Stewart in Found Sci 15(4):395–409, 2010a ) answer to the question “are we in the midst of a developmental process?” as expressed in his statement “that humanity has discovered the trajectory of past evolution and can see how it is likely to continue in the future”.
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  48. Ilham Dilman (1968). Professor Hepburn on Meaning in Life. Religious Studies 3 (2):547 - 554.score: 90.0
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  49. David Matheson (2011). Meaning in Life and Why It Matters Susan Wolf Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2010; 168 Pp.; $25.95 (Hardcover). [REVIEW] Dialogue 50 (1):787-789.score: 90.0
    Book Reviews David Matheson, Dialogue: Canadian Philosophical Review/Revue canadienne de philosophie , FirstView Article(s).
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  50. Thaddeus Metz (forthcoming). Critical Notice of Guy Bennett-Hunter, Ineffability and Religious Experience. Philosophia 43.score: 90.0
    A review essay on Guy Bennett-Hunter's new book, Ineffability and Religious Experience, particularly as it bears on issues concerning meaning in life.
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