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Profile: Mechthild Nagel (State University of New York (SUNY))
Profile: Mechthild Nagel (State University of New York (SUNY))
  1.  18
    Ann Ferguson & Mechthild Nagel (eds.) (2009). Dancing with Iris: The Philosophy of Iris Marion Young. Oxford University Press.
    The essays are organized into topic areas that are of interest to students in advanced undergraduate and graduate courses in ethics, feminist theory, and ...
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  2. Ann Ferguson & Mechthild Nagel (eds.) (2009). Dancing with Iris: The Philosophy of Iris Marios Young. Oxford University Press Usa.
    Iris Marion Young was a world-renowned feminist moral and political philosopher whose many books and articles spanned more than three decades. She explored issues of social justice and oppression theory, the phenomenology of women's bodies, deliberative democracy and questions of terrorism, violence, international law and the role of the national security state. Her works have been of great interest to those both in the analytic and Continental philosophical tradition, and her roots range from critical theory, and phenomenology to poststructural psychoanalytic (...)
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  3.  62
    Mechthild Nagel (2008). What If Habermas Went Native? peace studies journal 1:1-12.
    Using Habermas’s latest major work Between Facts and Norms (1996), this paper contrasts his explicit views on jurisprudence in the Occident with implied statements about the native Other. I wish to show that there’s an embedded agonistic (combative) — if not imperial — theme, not only in his theory of communicative competence, but also in his larger project of critical theory.
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  4. Mechthild Nagel (2000). Deane Curtin and Robert Litke, Eds., Institutional Violence Reviewed By. Philosophy in Review 20 (6):408-409.
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  5.  3
    Mechthild Nagel (1997). Critical Theory Meets the Ethic of Care. Social Theory and Practice 23 (2):307-326.
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  6. Mechthild Nagel (1997). Care, Gender, and Justice (Book Review). Social Theory and Practice 23 (2):307-327.
    A materialist feminist approach to the ethics of care.
     
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  7.  1
    Mechthild Nagel (2016). Philosophy Beyond the Carceral. Radical Philosophy Review 19 (2):523-527.
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  8.  7
    Mechthild Nagel (1999). Feminist Interpretations of Immanuel Kant (Review). Hypatia 14 (3):169-172.
  9. Mechthild Nagel (1995). Seyla Benhabib, Judith Butler, Drucilla Cornell, and Nancy Fraser, with an Introduction by Linda Nicholson, Feminist Contentions: A Philosophical Exchange Reviewed By. Philosophy in Review 15 (3):158-160.
     
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  10.  19
    Mechthild Nagel (2007). Scholar's Symposium: The Work of Angela Y. Davis. [REVIEW] Human Studies 30 (4):281-290.
  11. Mechthild Nagel (1998). Nancy Fraser, Justice Interruptus: Critical Reflections on the'PostSocialist'Condition Reviewed By. Philosophy in Review 18 (3):172-174.
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  12.  7
    Mechthild Nagel (2007). In Search of Abolition Democracy. Radical Philosophy Today 5:229-235.
    This paper focuses on the meaning of Du Bois’s concept of “abolition democracy” and on the ideology of the abstract rights-bearing subject. In Abolition Democracy, Angela Y. Davis calls for the abolition of oppressive institutions, such as U.S. prisons, in order to engender abolition democracy. She also questions how subjects appear before the law, which justifies and normalizes inhumane practices, such as the death penalty. In conclusion, the paper explores ideas on how to conceptualize thinking “beyond” the prison industrial complex (...)
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  13.  10
    Mechthild Nagel (2002). P.J. Huntingdon, Ecstatic Subjects, Utopia, and Recognition: Kristeva, Heidegger, Irigaray. Human Studies 25 (2):251-256.
  14.  6
    Mechthild Nagel (2007). In Search of Abolition Democracy. Radical Philosophy Today 2007:229-235.
    This paper focuses on the meaning of Du Bois’s concept of “abolition democracy” and on the ideology of the abstract rights-bearing subject. In Abolition Democracy, Angela Y. Davis calls for the abolition of oppressive institutions, such as U.S. prisons, in order to engender abolition democracy. She also questions how subjects appear before the law, which justifies and normalizes inhumane practices, such as the death penalty. In conclusion, the paper explores ideas on how to conceptualize thinking “beyond” the prison industrial complex (...)
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  15.  5
    Mechthild Nagel (1999). Review: Schott, Feminist Interpretations of Immanuel Kant. [REVIEW] Hypatia 14 (3):169-172.
  16.  3
    Mechthild Nagel (2007). Bearing Witness to Injustice. Human Studies 30 (4):281 - 290.
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  17.  2
    Mechthild Nagel (2002). Review: Towards a Critical Social Ontology. [REVIEW] Human Studies 25 (2):251 - 256.
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  18. Andrew Light & Mechthild Nagel (eds.) (2000). Race, Class, and Community Identity. Humanity Books.
    Despite the intransigent nature of many of the problems discussed, the contributors to this volume demonstrate the possibilities for developing a viable alternative politics.
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  19. Mechthild Nagel (1996). Allison Weir, Sacrificial Logics: Feminist Theory and the Critique of Identity Reviewed By. Philosophy in Review 16 (4):305-307.
  20. Mechthild Nagel (1999). Book Review: Robin May Schott. Feminist Interpretations of Immanuel Kant. University Park: Pennsylvania State Press, 1997. [REVIEW] Hypatia: A Journal of Feminist Philosophy 14 (3):169-172.
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  21. Mechthild Nagel (2000). Deane Curtin and Robert Litke, Eds., Institutional Violence. [REVIEW] Philosophy in Review 20:408-409.
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  22.  1
    Mechthild Nagel (2002). Masking the Abject: A Genealogy of Play. Lexington Books.
    Masking the Abject traces the beginnings of the malediction of play in Western metaphysics to Aristotle. Mechthild Nagel's innovative study demonstrates how play has served as a 'castaway' in western philosophical thinking: It is considered to be repulsive and loathsome, yet also fascinating and desirable. The book illustrates how play 'succeeds' and proliferates after Hegel—despite its denunciation by classical philosophers—entering Marxist, phenomenological, postmodern, and feminist discourses. This work provides the reader with a superb analyisis of how the distinction between the (...)
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  23. Mechthild Nagel (1994). Robert E. Wheeler, Dragons for Sale: Studies in Unreason Reviewed By. Philosophy in Review 14 (4):298-299.
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  24. Mechthild Nagel (1994). Robert E. Wheeler, Dragons for Sale: Studies in Unreason. [REVIEW] Philosophy in Review 14:298-299.
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  25. Mechthild E. Nagel & Anthony J. Nocella Ii (eds.) (2013). The End of Prisons: Reflections From the Decarceration Movement. Brill | Rodopi.
    This book brings together a collection of social justice scholars and activists who take Foucault’s concept of discipline and punishment to explain how prisons are constructed in society from nursing homes to zoos. This book expands the concept of prison to include any institution that dominates, oppresses, and controls. Criminologists and others, who have been concerned with reforming or dismantling the criminal justice system, have mostly avoided to look at larger carceral structures in society. In this book, for example, scholars (...)
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