Search results for 'Medical care' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Lawrence Schneiderman (2011). Defining Medical Futility and Improving Medical Care. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 8 (2):123-131.score: 222.0
    It probably should not be surprising, in this time of soaring medical costs and proliferating technology, that an intense debate has arisen over the concept of medical futility. Should doctors be doing all the things they are doing? In particular, should they be attempting treatments that have little likelihood of achieving the goals of medicine? What are the goals of medicine? Can we agree when medical treatment fails to achieve such goals? What should the physician do and (...)
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  2. Michel Wensing, Björn Broge, Petra Kaufmann‐Kolle, Edith Andres & Joachim Szecsenyi (2004). Quality Circles to Improve Prescribing Patterns in Primary Medical Care: What is Their Actual Impact? Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 10 (3):457-466.score: 210.0
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  3. Gavin H. Mooney & Alistair McGuire (eds.) (1988). Medical Ethics and Economics in Health Care. Oxford University Press.score: 204.0
    Providing health care in the most cost-effective way has become a priority in recent years. This book tackles the important issue of the potential conflict between economic expediency and the welfare of individual patients. Contributors examine different attitudes to this complex problem, along with a variety of legal and historical perspectives. The book addresses particular aspects of health care, such as medical expert systems, general practice, medical education, and clinical decision-making where the direct involvement of doctors (...)
     
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  4. Brian McKenna (2012). The Clash of Medical Civilizations: Experiencing “Primary Care” in a Neoliberal Culture. [REVIEW] Journal of Medical Humanities 33 (4):255-272.score: 198.0
    An anthropologist describes how he found himself at the vortex of a “clash of medical civilizations:” neoliberalism and the international primary health care movement. His involvement in a $6 million social change initiative in medical education became a basis to unlock the hidden tensions, contradictions and movements within the “primary care” phenomenon. The essay is structured on five ethnographic stories, situated on a continuum from “natural” species-level primary care to “unnatural” neoliberal primary care. Food (...)
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  5. J. de Boer, G. van Blijderveen, G. van Dijk, H. J. Duivenvoorden & M. Williams (2012). Implementing Structured, Multiprofessional Medical Ethical Decision-Making in a Neonatal Intensive Care Unit. Journal of Medical Ethics 38 (10):596-601.score: 198.0
    Background In neonatal intensive care, a child's death is often preceded by a medical decision. Nurses, social workers and pastors, however, are often excluded from ethical case deliberation. If multiprofessional ethical case deliberations do take place, participants may not always know how to perform to the fullest. Setting A level-IIID neonatal intensive care unit of a paediatric teaching hospital in the Netherlands. Methods Structured multiprofessional medical ethical decision-making (MEDM) was implemented to help overcome problems experienced. Important (...)
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  6. A. Baumann, G. Audibert, C. G. Lafaye, L. Puybasset, P. -M. Mertes & F. Claudot (2013). Elective Non-Therapeutic Intensive Care and the Four Principles of Medical Ethics. Journal of Medical Ethics 39 (3):139-142.score: 198.0
    The chronic worldwide lack of organs for transplantation and the continuing improvement of strategies for in situ organ preservation have led to renewed interest in elective non-therapeutic ventilation of potential organ donors. Two types of situation may be eligible for elective intensive care: patients definitely evolving towards brain death and patients suitable as controlled non-heart beating organ donors after life-supporting therapies have been assessed as futile and withdrawn. Assessment of the ethical acceptability and the risks of these strategies is (...)
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  7. James A. Marcum (2011). Care and Competence in Medical Practice: Francis Peabody Confronts Jason Posner. [REVIEW] Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 14 (2):143-153.score: 198.0
    In this paper, I discuss the role of care and competence, as well as their relationship to one another, in contemporary medical practice. I distinguish between two types of care. The first type, care1, represents a natural concern that motivates physicians to help or to act on the behalf of patients, i.e. to care about them. However, this care cannot guarantee the correct technical or right ethical action of physicians to meet the bodily and existential (...)
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  8. Catherine Phillips (2012). Mutual Humanization: A Visual Exploration of Relationships in Medical Care. [REVIEW] Journal of Medical Humanities 33 (2):109-116.score: 192.0
    In this article, I explore the work of the artist Robert Pope (b.1957- d.1992) who published a series of paintings and drawings which documented his decade-long experience with Hodgkin's lymphoma. More widely, Pope was interested in ‘the culture’ of cancer within hospitals and the relationships embedded in experiences of illness and care. Pope published a book that contains much of this work— Illness and Healing: Images of Cancer (1991). Many of the original artworks have been toured throughout Canada and (...)
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  9. Sandra Tanenbaum (2012). Improving the Quality of Medical Care: The Normativity of Evidence-Based Performance Standards. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 33 (4):263-277.score: 192.0
    Poor quality medical care is sometimes attributed to physicians’ unwillingness to act on evidence about what works best. Evidence-based performance standards (EBPSs) are one response to this problem, and they are increasingly employed by health care regulators and payers. Evidence in this instance is judged according to the precepts of evidence-based medicine (EBM); it is probabilistic, and the randomized controlled trial (RCT) is the gold standard. This means that EBPSs suffer all the infirmities of EBM generally—well rehearsed (...)
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  10. Mats Hansson (2012). Where Should We Draw the Line Between Quality of Care and Other Ethical Concerns Related to Medical Registries and Biobanks? Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 33 (4):313-323.score: 192.0
    Together with large biobanks of human samples, medical registries with aggregated data from many clinical centers are vital parts of an infrastructure for maintaining high standards of quality with regard to medical diagnosis and treatment. The rapid development in personalized medicine and pharmaco-genomics only underscores the future need for these infrastructures. However, registries and biobanks have been criticized as constituting great risks to individual privacy. In this article, I suggest that quality with regard to diagnosis and treatment is (...)
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  11. C. Sommer, M. Boos, E. Conradi, N. Biller-Andorno & C. Wiesemann (2011). Care and Justice Arguments in the Ethical Reasoning of Medical Students. Ramon Llull Journal of Applied Ethics 1 (2):9.score: 192.0
    Objectives: To gather empirical data on how gender and educational level influence bioethical reasoning among medical students by analyzing their use of care versus justice arguments for reconciling a bioethical dilemma. Setting: University Departments of Medical Ethics, Social and Communication Psychology in Germany. Participants: First and fifth year medical students. Design and method: Multidisciplinary, empirical, 2-segment study of ethics in action: In intrapersonal Segment 1, the students were presented with a bioethical dilemma and then administered a (...)
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  12. E. Krizova (2002). Rationing of Expensive Medical Care in a Transition Country—Nihil Novum? Journal of Medical Ethics 28 (5):308-312.score: 186.0
    This article focuses on rationing of expensive medical care in the Czech Republic. It distinguishes between political and clinical decision levels and reviews the debate in the Western literature on explicit and implicit rules. The contemporary situation of the Czech health care system is considered from this perspective. Rationing reoccurred in the mid 90s after the shift in health care financing from fee-for-service to prospective budgets. The lack of explicit rules is obvious. Implicit forms of rationing, (...)
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  13. Samuel Gorovitz (1982/1985). Doctors' Dilemmas: Moral Conflict and Medical Care. Oxford University Press.score: 186.0
    Doctor's Dilemmas, a fascinating study of the moral dilemmas confronting health professionals and patients alike, examines areas of health care where ethical conflicts often arise. Gorovitz illuminates these conflicts by clearly explaining and applying a broad range of philosophical concepts. He lays the groundwork for informed ethical decision-making and provides the general reader with a lucid overview of the complexities of medical practice. Written in accessible, conversational style and making extensive use of anecdotes, examples, and references to literature, (...)
     
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  14. M. Hilberman, J. Kutner, D. Parsons & D. J. Murphy (1997). Marginally Effective Medical Care: Ethical Analysis of Issues in Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (CPR). Journal of Medical Ethics 23 (6):361-367.score: 186.0
    Outcomes from cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) remain distressingly poor. Overuse of CPR is attributable to unrealistic expectations, unintended consequences of existing policies and failure to honour patient refusal of CPR. We analyzed the CPR outcomes literature using the bioethical principles of beneficence, non-maleficence, autonomy and justice and developed a proposal for selective use of CPR. Beneficence supports use of CPR when most effective. Non-maleficence argues against performing CPR when the outcomes are harmful or usage inappropriate. Additionally, policies which usurp good clinical (...)
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  15. Lawrence J. Schneiderman (2011). Rationing Just Medical Care. American Journal of Bioethics 11 (7):7 - 14.score: 180.0
    U.S. politicians and policymakers have been preoccupied with how to pay for health care. Hardly any thought has been given to what should be paid for?as though health care is a commodity that needs no examination?or what health outcomes should receive priority in a just society, i.e., rationing. I present a rationing proposal, consistent with U.S. culture and traditions, that deals not with ?health care,? the terminology used in the current debate, but with the more modest and (...)
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  16. Hisako Inaba (2008). A Comparative Case Study of American and Japanese Medical Care of a Terminally Ill Patient. Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 5:19-31.score: 180.0
    How is a terminally ill patient treated by the surrounding people in the U.S. and Japan? How does a terminally ill patient decide on his or her own treatment? These questions will be examined in a study of intensive medical care, received by a terminally ill Japanese cancer patient in the U.S. and Japan. This casereflects the participant observation by a Japanese anthropologist for about 8 years in the United States and Japan on one patient who was hospitalized (...)
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  17. Theresa Drought (1992). Justice and the Moral Acceptability of Rationing Medical Care: The Oregon Experiment. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 17 (1):97-117.score: 180.0
    The Oregon Basic Health Services Act of 1989 seeks to establish universal access to basic medical care for all currently uninsured Oregon residents. To control the increasing cost of medical care, the Oregon plan will restrict funding according to a priority list of medical interventions. The basic level of medical care provided to residents with incomes below the federal poverty line will vary according to the funds made available by the Oregon legislature. A (...)
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  18. Stephan W. Sahm (2000). Palliative Care Versus Euthanasia. The German Position: The German General Medical Council's Principles for Medical Care of the Terminally Ill. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 25 (2):195 – 219.score: 180.0
    In September 1998 the Bundesrztekammer, i.e., the German Medical Association, published new principles concerning terminal medical care. Even before publication, a draft of these principles was very controversial, and prompted intense public debate in the mass media. Despite some of the critics' suspicions that the principles prepared the way for liberalization of active euthanasia, euthanasia is unequivocally rejected in the principles. Physician-assisted suicide is considered to violate professional medical rules. In leaving aside some of the notions (...)
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  19. Muriel R. Gillick (2012). Doing the Right Thing: A Geriatrician's Perspective on Medical Care for the Person with Advanced Dementia. Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 40 (1):51-56.score: 180.0
    Developing a reasonable approach to the medical care of older people with dementia will be essential in the coming decades. Physicians are the locus of decision making for persons with dementia. It is the responsibility of the physician to assure that the surrogate understands the nature and trajectory of the disease and then to elicit the desired goal of care. Physicians need to ascertain whether any advance directives are available, and if so, whether they apply to the (...)
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  20. David G. Green (1993). Medical Care in Britain Before the Welfare State. Critical Review 7 (4):479-495.score: 180.0
    In Britain before 1911, the vast majority of the population provided medical care for themselves and had evolved a variety of schemes that checked the power of organized medicine and encouraged a steady improvement in standards. The evidence is that at the end of the nineteenth century about 5?6 percent of the population relied on the poor law, 10?15 percent on free care from charitable institutions, 75 percent on mutual aid, and the remainder paid fees to private (...)
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  21. James Giordano (2010). Respice...Prospice: Philosophy, Ethics and Medical Care- Past, Present, and Future. [REVIEW] Philosophy, Ethics, and Humanities in Medicine 5 (1):1-3.score: 180.0
    Respice...prospice: Philosophy, ethics and the character of medical care for the future.
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  22. B. G. Haire (2013). Ethics of Medical Care and Clinical Research: A Qualitative Study of Principal Investigators in Biomedical HIV Prevention Research. Journal of Medical Ethics 39 (4):231-235.score: 180.0
    In clinical research there is a tension between the role of a doctor, who must serve the best interests of the patient, and the role of the researcher, who must produce knowledge that may not have any immediate benefits for the research participant. This tension is exacerbated in HIV research in low and middle income countries, which frequently uncovers comorbidities other than the condition under study. Some bioethicists argue that as the goals of medicine and those of research are distinct, (...)
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  23. Mansoor Elahi (2011). Medical Ethics: A Practical Guide to Patient Care, Related Ethics, Conventions and Laws. Mtro Medical Publishing.score: 180.0
     
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  24. R. M. Nelson & T. Drought (1992). Justice and the Moral Acceptability of Rationing Medical Care: The Oregon Experiment. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 17 (1):97-117.score: 180.0
    The Oregon Basic Health Services Act of 1989 seeks to establish universal access to basic medical care for all currently uninsured Oregon residents. To control the increasing cost of medical care, the Oregon plan will restrict funding according to a priority list of medical interventions. The basic level of medical care provided to residents with incomes below the federal poverty line will vary according to the funds made available by the Oregon legislature. A (...)
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  25. Reinhard Priester (ed.) (1989). Rethinking Medical Morality: The Ethical Implications of Changes in Health Care Organization, Delivery, and Financing. Center for Biomedical Ethics, University of Minnesota.score: 180.0
     
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  26. Ruiping Fan (2007). Corrupt Practices in Chinese Medical Care: The Root in Public Policies and a Call for Confucian-Market Approach. Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 17 (2):111-131.score: 174.0
    : This paper argues that three salient corrupt practices that mark contemporary Chinese health care, namely the over-prescription of indicated drugs, the prescription of more expensive forms of medication and more expensive diagnostic work-ups than needed, and illegal cash payments to physicians—i.e., red packages—result not from the introduction of the market to China, but from two clusters of circumstances. First, there has been a loss of the Confucian appreciation of the proper role of financial reward for good health (...). Second, misguided governmental policies have distorted the behavior of physicians and hospitals. The distorting policies include (1) setting very low salaries for physicians, (2) providing bonuses to physicians and profits to hospitals from the excessive prescription of drugs and the use of more expensive drugs and unnecessary expensive diagnostic procedures, and (3) prohibiting payments by patients to physicians for higher quality care. The latter problem is complicated by policies that do not allow the use of governmental insurance and funds from medical savings accounts in private hospitals as well as other policies that fail to create a level playing field for both private and government hospitals. The corrupt practices currently characterizing Chinese health care will require not only abolishing the distorting governmental policies but also drawing on Confucian moral resources to establish a rightly directed appreciation of the proper place of financial reward in the practice of medicine. (shrink)
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  27. Jessica Price & Agnes Binagwaho (2010). From Medical Rationing to Rationalizing the Use of Human Resources for Aids Care and Treatment in Africa: A Case for Task Shifting. Developing World Bioethics 10 (2):99-103.score: 174.0
    With a global commitment to scaling up AIDS care and treatment in resource-poor settings for some of the most HIV-affected countries in Africa, availability of antiretroviral treatment is no longer the principal obstacle to expanding access to treatment. A shortage of trained healthcare personnel to initiate treatment and manage patients represents a more challenging barrier to offering life-saving treatment to all patients in need. Physician-centered treatment policies accentuate this challenge. Despite evidence that task shifting for nurse-centered AIDS patient (...) is effective and can alleviate severe physician shortages that currently obstruct treatment scale-up, political commitment and policy action to support task shifting models of care has been slow to absent. In this paper we review the evidence in support of task shifting for AIDS treatment in Africa and argue that continued policy inaction amounts to unwarranted healthcare rationing and as such is ethically untenable. (shrink)
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  28. Silvia Martínez‐Valverde, Angélica Castro‐Ríos, Ricardo Pérez‐Cuevas, Miguel Klunder‐Klunder, Guillermo Salinas‐Escudero & Hortensia Reyes‐Morales (2012). Effectiveness of a Medical Education Intervention to Treat Hypertension in Primary Care. Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 18 (2):420-425.score: 168.0
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  29. Carlos K. H. Wong, Cindy L. K. Lam, Jensen T. C. Poon, Sarah M. McGhee, Wai‐Lun Law, Dora L. W. Kwong, Janice Tsang & Pierre Chan (2012). Direct Medical Costs of Care for Chinese Patients with Colorectal Neoplasia: A Health Care Service Provider Perspective. Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 18 (6):1203-1210.score: 168.0
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  30. Tamara Kohn & Rosemary McKechnie (eds.) (1999). Extending the Boundaries of Care: Medical Ethics and Caring Practices. Berg.score: 168.0
    How is the concept of patient care adapting in response to rapid changes in healthcare delivery and advances in medical technology? How are questions of ethical responsibility and social diversity shaping the definitions of healthcare? In this topical study, scholars in anthropology, nursing theory, law and ethics explore questions involving the changing relationship between patient care and medical ethics. Contributors address issues that challenge the boundaries of patient care, such as: · HIV-related care and (...)
     
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  31. Olivia Wu, Robin Knill‐Jones, Philip Wilson & Neil Craig (2004). The Impact of Economic Information on Medical Decision Making in Primary Care. Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 10 (3):407-411.score: 168.0
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  32. Peter Olsthoorn, Myriame Bollen & Robert Beeres (2013). Dual Loyalties in Military Medical Care – Between Ethics and Effectiveness. In Herman Amersfoort, Rene Moelker, Joseph Soeters & Desiree Verweij (eds.), Moral Responsibility & Military Effectiveness. Asser.score: 162.0
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  33. Michael L. Gross (2011). Comradery, Community, and Care in Military Medical Ethics. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 32 (5):337-350.score: 162.0
    Medical ethics prohibits caregivers from discriminating and providing preferential care to their compatriots and comrades. In military medicine, particularly during war and when resources may be scarce, ethical principles may dictate priority care for compatriot soldiers. The principle of nondiscrimination is central to utilitarian and deontological theories of justice, but communitarianism and the ethics of care and friendship stipulate a different set of duties for community members, friends, and family. Similar duties exist among the small cohesive (...)
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  34. Rashmi Kumar, Vijay Jaiswal, Sandeep Tripathi, Akshay Kumar & M. Z. Idris (2007). Inequity in Health Care Delivery in India: The Problem of Rural Medical Practitioners. [REVIEW] Health Care Analysis 15 (3):223-233.score: 162.0
    A considerable section of the population in India accesses the services of individual private medical practitioners (PMPs) for primary level care. In rural areas, these providers include MBBS doctors, practitioners of alternative systems of medicine, herbalists, indigenous and folk practitioners, compounders and others. This paper describes the profile, knowledge and some practices of the rural doctor in India and then discusses the reasons for lack of equity in health care access in rural areas and possible solutions to (...)
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  35. Wei‐Chu Chie, Yi‐Hsin Chang & Hsiu‐Hsi Chen (2007). A Novel Method for Evaluation of Improved Survival Trend for Common Cancer: Early Detection or Improvement of Medical Care. Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 13 (1):79-85.score: 162.0
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  36. S. Gromb, G. Manciet & A. Descamps (1997). Ethics and Law in the Field of Medical Care for the Elderly in France. Journal of Medical Ethics 23 (4):233-238.score: 162.0
    The authors discuss law and ethics when medical decisions are to be taken by patients who are unable in any valid sense to express their own wishes. The main problem in legal terms is to protect an individual's free will as far as possible and ensure that his or her wishes, if known, are respected. If a patient's independent wishes cannot be known, then we must at least ensure that nothing is imposed which is not in his interest. Legal (...)
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  37. Johan M. Berlin (2010). Synchronous Work: Myth or Reality? A Critical Study of Teams in Health and Medical Care. Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 16 (6):1314-1321.score: 162.0
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  38. C. L. Buchanan & E. W. Prior (eds.) (1985). Medical Care and Markets: Conflicts Between Efficiency and Justice. Centre of Policy Studies, Monash University.score: 162.0
     
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  39. Simon Hoelzer, Werner Waechter, Andrew Stewart, Raymond Liu, Ralf Schweiger & Joachim Dudeck (2001). Towards Case‐Based Performance Measures: Uncovering Deficiencies in Applied Medical Care. Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 7 (4):355-363.score: 162.0
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  40. Elliot N. Dorff (1997). Paying for Medical Care: A Jewish View. Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 7 (1):15-30.score: 156.0
    : According to Jewish law, there is a clear obligation to try to heal, and this duty devolves upon both the physician and the society. Jewish sources make it clear that health care is not only an individual and familial responsibility, but also a communal one. This social aspect of health care manifests itself in Jewish law in two ways: first, no community is complete until it has the personnel (and, one assumes, the facilities) to provide health (...); second, the community must pay for the health care of those who cannot afford it as part of its provision for the poor. The community, in turn, must use its resources wisely, which is the moral basis within the Jewish tradition for some system of managed care. The community must balance its commitment to provide health care with the provision of other services. (shrink)
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  41. L. Kilbrandon (1982). Medical Malpractice Law, A Comparative Law Study of Civil Responsibility Arising From Medical Care. Journal of Medical Ethics 8 (1):51-51.score: 156.0
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  42. Gary E. Jones (1989). Medical Malpractice and the Legal Standard of Care. Journal of Medical Humanities 10 (1):45-54.score: 156.0
    In this essay, I examine the relationship between lawsuits for medical malpractice and the legal standard of care. I suggest that there is an insidious, dynamic relationship between physicians' reactions to the recent increase in malpractice litigation and an artificial elevation of the legal standard of care. Since, that is, the legal standard for proper medical care is based upon the community standard of care rather than the reasonable person standard, to the extent that (...)
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  43. J. Tobin (2005). The Challenges and Ethical Dilemmas of a Military Medical Officer Serving with a Peacekeeping Operation in Regard to the Medical Care of the Local Population. Journal of Medical Ethics 31 (10):571-574.score: 156.0
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  44. Ben A. Rich (2001). Book Reviews: Death Foretold: Prophecy and Prognosis in Medical Care. Nicholas A. Christakis. (2000). Chicago: University of Chicago Press. 199 Pp.(Hardcover). [REVIEW] Journal of Medical Humanities 22 (3):247-249.score: 156.0
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  45. Mitchell S. Cappell (2011). The Physician-Administrator as Patient Distinctive Aspects of Medical Care. Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 54 (2):232-242.score: 156.0
    Although much has been written about how physicians react to their own illness, the subject of how health-care workers react differently to sick physicians compared to ordinary patients is largely unstudied (Klitzman 2008; Mandell and Spiro 1987; Mullan 1985; Pinner and Miller 1952; Sachs 1989; Schneck 1998). As a senior physician-administrator admitted to my hospital for a major illness, I was treated as a physician-administrator and local celebrity, rather than an ordinary patient, by everybody from physicians to janitors. Positive (...)
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  46. H. Kuhse (2002). Response to Ronald M Perkin and David B Resnik: The Agony of Trying to Match Sanctity of Life and Patient-Centred Medical Care. Journal of Medical Ethics 28 (4):270-272.score: 156.0
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  47. J. Gilbert (2002). Death Foretold: Prophecy and Prognosis in Medical Care: N A Christakis. University of Chicago Press, 1999, US$30.00, Pp 328. ISBN 0 226 10470. [REVIEW] Journal of Medical Ethics 28 (2):129-a-129.score: 156.0
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  48. M. Jefferys (1983). Doctors, Patients and Society: Power and Authority in Medical Care. Journal of Medical Ethics 9 (3):177-177.score: 156.0
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  49. A. M. Smith (1995). Challenges in Medical Care. Journal of Medical Ethics 21 (2):123-123.score: 156.0
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  50. German Medical Association (2000). Principles of the German Medical Association Concerning Terminal Medical Care. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 25 (2):254-58.score: 156.0
     
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