Search results for 'Medical care Law and legislation' (try it on Scholar)

1000+ found
Sort by:
  1. Mansoor Elahi (2011). Medical Ethics: A Practical Guide to Patient Care, Related Ethics, Conventions and Laws. Mtro Medical Publishing.score: 151.5
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. Charles Foster (2009). Choosing Life, Choosing Death: The Tyranny of Autonomy in Medical Ethics and Law. Hart Pub..score: 136.5
  3. Joan McCarthy (ed.) (2011). End-of-Life Care: Ethics and Law. Cork University Press.score: 135.0
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. Kenneth S. Reinker & David Rosenberg (2011). Improve Medical Malpractice Law by Letting Health Care Insurers Take Charge. Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 39 (3):539-542.score: 117.0
    This essay discusses unlimited insurance subrogation (UIS) as a means of improving the deterrence and compensation results of medical malpractice law. Under UIS, health care insureds could assign their entire potential medical malpractice claims to their first-party commercial and government insurers. UIS should improve deterrence by establishing first-party insurers as plaintiffs to confront liability insurers on the defense side, leading to more effective prosecution of meritorious claims and reducing meritless and unnecessary litigation. UIS should improve compensation outcomes (...)
    Translate to English
    | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. Stefania Negri (ed.) (2012). Self-Determination, Dignity and End-of-Life Care: Regulating Advance Directives in International and Comparative Perspective. M. Nijhoff Pub..score: 112.5
    By providing an interdisciplinary reading of advance directives regulation in international, European and domestic law, this book offers new insights into the most controversial legal issues surrounding the debate over dignity and autonomy ...
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  6. Judith Hendrick (2004). Law and Ethics. Nelson Thornes.score: 109.5
    Provides an insight into the general principles of the professional-patient relationship.
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  7. Michael D. A. Freeman (ed.) (2008). Law and Bioethics / Edited by Michael Freeman. Oxford University Press.score: 109.5
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  8. Mark Henaghan (2011). Health Professionals and Trust: The Cure for Healthcare Law and Policy. Routledge-Cavendish.score: 109.5
  9. Sally Sheldon & Michael Thomson (eds.) (1998). Feminist Perspectives on Health Care Law. Cavendish Pub..score: 105.0
    This book brings together new work by some of the foremost writers in the health care law arena. It presents exciting new insights,drawing on feminist theory and methodology to further our understanding of health care law. Whilst the book makes a real contribution to both feminist debates and the analysis of this area of law, it is also accessible to the undergraduate student who is approaching this area of legal scholarship and feminist jurisprudence for the first time. Its (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  10. José Miola (2007). Medical Ethics and Medical Law: A Symbiotic Relationship. Hart.score: 105.0
    Introduction -- Historical perspectives of medical ethics -- The medical ethics Renaissance: a brief assessment -- Risk disclosure/'informed consent' -- Consent, control and minors: Gillick and beyond -- Sterilisation/best interests: legislation intervenes -- The end of life: total abrogation -- Medical ethics in government-commissioned reports -- Conclusion.
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  11. S. Gromb, G. Manciet & A. Descamps (1997). Ethics and Law in the Field of Medical Care for the Elderly in France. Journal of Medical Ethics 23 (4):233-238.score: 100.5
    The authors discuss law and ethics when medical decisions are to be taken by patients who are unable in any valid sense to express their own wishes. The main problem in legal terms is to protect an individual's free will as far as possible and ensure that his or her wishes, if known, are respected. If a patient's independent wishes cannot be known, then we must at least ensure that nothing is imposed which is not in his interest. Legal (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  12. David Larios Risco & Fernando Abellán-García Sánchez (eds.) (2009). Error Sanitario y Seguridad de Pacientes: Bases Jurídicas Para Un Registro de Sucesos Adversos En El Sistema Nacional de Salud. Comares.score: 100.5
    Translate to English
    |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  13. Anne Rilliet Howald (2004). La Réforme des Régimes de Soins de Santé: Cadre International Et Communautaire, Thématiques Actuelles. Presses Universitaires d'Aix-Marseille.score: 100.5
    Translate to English
    |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  14. Søren Holm (2008). Best Interests: What Problems in Family Law Should Health Care Law Avoid? [REVIEW] Health Care Analysis 16 (3):252-254.score: 99.0
    This article comments briefly on three specific issues in Shazia Choudhry’s paper “‘Best Interests’ What can healthcare law learn from family law?” The three issues are: (1) the implications of ‘best interests’ and ‘welfare science’ for women within the family law and the health care law context, (2) the risk of capture by the ‘welfare science’ industry, and (3) the proposal that a committee of medical experts and medical ethicists should be set up to provide reports to (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  15. André den Exter (ed.) (2010). Human Rights and Biomedicine. Maklu.score: 98.0
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  16. Hamide Tacir (2011). Hastanın Kendi Geleceğini Belirleme Hakkı. Xii Levha.score: 98.0
    Translate to English
    |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  17. David J. Rothman (2003/2008). Strangers at the Bedside: A History of How Law and Bioethics Transformed Medical Decision Making. Aldinetransaction.score: 90.0
    Introduction: making the invisible visible -- The nobility of the material -- Research at war -- The guilded age of research -- The doctor as whistle-blower -- New rules for the laboratory -- Bedside ethics -- The doctor as stranger -- Life through death -- Commissioning ethics -- No one to trust -- New rules for the bedside -- Epilogue: The price of success.
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  18. Richard Huxtable (2008). Whatever You Want? Beyond the Patient in Medical Law. Health Care Analysis 16 (3):288-301.score: 90.0
    Simon Woods proposes that we ought to re-orientate clinical decisions at the end of life back towards the patient, so as to honour his or her account of their “global” interests. Woods condemns the current medico-legal approach for remaining too closely tethered to the views of doctors. In this response, I trace the story of Mrs Kelly Taylor, who sought to be sedated and have life-sustaining treatment withdrawn, and I do so in order to show not only why Woods is (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  19. David N. Weisstub (ed.) (1998). Research on Human Subjects: Ethics, Law, and Social Policy. Pergamon.score: 90.0
    There have been serious controversies in the latter part of the 20th century about the roles and functions of scientific and medical research. In whose interests are medical and biomedical experiments conducted and what are the ethical implications of experimentation on subjects unable to give competent consent? From the decades following the Second World War and calls for the global banning of medical research to the cautious return to the notion that in controlled circumstances, medical research (...)
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  20. J. K. Mason (2003/2002). Law and Medical Ethics. Lexisnexis Uk.score: 89.0
    This new edition of Law and Medical Ethics continues to chart the ever-widening field that the topics cover. The interplay between the health caring professions and the public during the period intervening since the last edition has, perhaps, been mainly dominated by wide-ranging changes in the administration of the National Health Service and of the professions themselves but these have been paralleled by important developments in medical jurisprudence.
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  21. L. Kilbrandon (1982). Medical Malpractice Law, A Comparative Law Study of Civil Responsibility Arising From Medical Care. Journal of Medical Ethics 8 (1):51-51.score: 88.5
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  22. Linda Delany (1996). Health Care Law—Legal Developments in Good Medical Practice. Health Care Analysis 4 (2):164-166.score: 88.5
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  23. Alexander McCall Smith & Alan Merry (1996). Health Care Law: Medical Accountability and the Criminal Law: New Zealand Vs the World. Health Care Analysis 4 (1):45-54.score: 88.5
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  24. Ron Paterson (1996). Health Care Law: Medical Manslaughter Law Reform: A Mistaken Diagnosis. Health Care Analysis 4 (1):54-59.score: 88.5
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  25. Ari Zivotofsky (2009). Medical Care of Terrorists is “Beyond the Letter of the Law”. American Journal of Bioethics 9 (10):43-45.score: 85.5
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  26. Ian Kennedy (1988). Treat Me Right: Essays in Medical Law and Ethics. Clarendon Press.score: 84.0
    Controversial and amusing, this collection of Kennedy's writings illuminates the rights, duties, and liabilities of doctors as well as other aspects of medical law and ethics.
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  27. Alessia T. Bell (2000). Criminal Law/Medical Malpractice: Court Strikes Down Murder Conviction of Physician Where Inappropriate Care Led to Patient's Death. Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 28 (2):194-195.score: 84.0
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  28. Barry R. Furrow (1993). Quality Control in Health Care: Developments in the Law of Medical Malpractice. Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 21 (2):173-192.score: 84.0
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  29. Jonathan Herring (2008). Medical Law and Ethics. Oxford University Press.score: 84.0
    This book provides a clear, concise description of medical law; but it does more than that. It also provides an introduction to the ethical principles that can be used to challenge or support the law. It also provides a range of perspectives from which to analyse the law: feminist, religious and sociological perspectives are all used.
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  30. J. K. Mason (2005). Mason & Mccall Smith's Law and Medical Ethics. Oxford University Press.score: 84.0
    Mason and McCall Smith's classic textbook discusses the relationship of medical practice and ethics with the operation of the law. The subjects covered include natural and assisted reproduction, the impact of modern genetics on medicine, medical confidentiality, consent to medical treatment, the use of resources and problems surrounding death in the new medical era. It is of significance to anyone with an interest in the ethical and legal practice of medicine.
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  31. Heidi Boerstler (2002). Morreim:Holding Health Care Accountable: Law and the New Medical Marketplace. Inquiry 39 (1):88-88.score: 81.0
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  32. Ronald E. Cranford & A. Edward Doudera (eds.) (1984). Institutional Ethics Committees and Health Care Decision Making. Health Administration Press.score: 80.0
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  33. Roberta M. Berry, Lisa Bliss, Sylvia Caley, Paul A. Lombardo & Leslie E. Wolf (2013). Recent Developments in Health Care Law: Culture and Controversy. [REVIEW] HEC Forum 25 (1):1-24.score: 78.0
    This article reviews recent developments in health care law, focusing on controversy at the intersection of health care law and culture. The article addresses: emerging issues in federal regulatory oversight of the rapidly developing market in direct-to-consumer genetic testing, including questions about the role of government oversight and professional mediation of consumer choice; continuing controversies surrounding stem cell research and therapies and the implications of these controversies for healthcare institutions; a controversy in India arising at the intersection of (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  34. Elliot N. Dorff (1998). Matters of Life and Death: A Jewish Approach to Modern Medical Ethics. Jewish Publication Society.score: 77.0
    In Matters of Life and Death Elliot Dorff thoroughly addresses this unavoidable confluence of medical technology and Jewish law and ethics.
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  35. Lawrence Schneiderman (2011). Defining Medical Futility and Improving Medical Care. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 8 (2):123-131.score: 76.5
    It probably should not be surprising, in this time of soaring medical costs and proliferating technology, that an intense debate has arisen over the concept of medical futility. Should doctors be doing all the things they are doing? In particular, should they be attempting treatments that have little likelihood of achieving the goals of medicine? What are the goals of medicine? Can we agree when medical treatment fails to achieve such goals? What should the physician do and (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  36. Brian McKenna (2012). The Clash of Medical Civilizations: Experiencing “Primary Care” in a Neoliberal Culture. [REVIEW] Journal of Medical Humanities 33 (4):255-272.score: 75.0
    An anthropologist describes how he found himself at the vortex of a “clash of medical civilizations:” neoliberalism and the international primary health care movement. His involvement in a $6 million social change initiative in medical education became a basis to unlock the hidden tensions, contradictions and movements within the “primary care” phenomenon. The essay is structured on five ethnographic stories, situated on a continuum from “natural” species-level primary care to “unnatural” neoliberal primary care. Food (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  37. David W. Meyers (2006). The Human Body and the Law: A Medico-Legal Study. Aldine Transaction.score: 75.0
    Thus, Meyers provides a valuable account, not only of current medical attitudes, but also of relevant case and statute law as it stands at present.
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  38. Kerry J. Breen (ed.) (2010). Good Medical Practice: Professionalism, Ethics and Law. Cambridge University Press.score: 75.0
    Written by specialist practitioners with vast teaching experience, this is a unique, timely and accessible text that reinforces a contemporary focus on professionalism in medical practice.
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  39. Roberta Berry, Lisa Bliss, Sylvia Caley, Paul Lombardo, Jerri Rooker, Jonathan Todres & Leslie Wolf (2010). Recent Developments in Health Care Law: Partners in Innovation. [REVIEW] HEC Forum 22 (2):85-116.score: 75.0
    This article reviews recent developments in health care law, focusing on the engagement of law as a partner in health care innovation. The article addresses: the history and contents of recent United States federal law restricting the use of genetic information by insurers and employers; the recent federal policy recommending routine HIV testing; the recent revision of federal policy regarding the funding of human embryonic stem cell research; the history, current status, and need for future attention to advance (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  40. J. de Boer, G. van Blijderveen, G. van Dijk, H. J. Duivenvoorden & M. Williams (2012). Implementing Structured, Multiprofessional Medical Ethical Decision-Making in a Neonatal Intensive Care Unit. Journal of Medical Ethics 38 (10):596-601.score: 75.0
    Background In neonatal intensive care, a child's death is often preceded by a medical decision. Nurses, social workers and pastors, however, are often excluded from ethical case deliberation. If multiprofessional ethical case deliberations do take place, participants may not always know how to perform to the fullest. Setting A level-IIID neonatal intensive care unit of a paediatric teaching hospital in the Netherlands. Methods Structured multiprofessional medical ethical decision-making (MEDM) was implemented to help overcome problems experienced. Important (...)
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  41. M. Strätling, V. E. Scharf & P. Schmucker (2004). Mental Competence and Surrogate Decision-Making Towards the End of Life. Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 7 (2):209-215.score: 75.0
    German legislation demands that decisions about the treatment of mentally incompetent patients require an ‘informed consent’. If this was not given by the patient him-/herself before he/she became incompetent, it has to be sought by the physician from a guardian, who has to be formally legitimized before. Additionally this surrogate has to seek the permission of a Court of Guardianship (Vormundschaftsgericht), if he/she intends to consent to interventions, which pose significant risks to the health or the life of the (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  42. A. Baumann, G. Audibert, C. G. Lafaye, L. Puybasset, P. -M. Mertes & F. Claudot (2013). Elective Non-Therapeutic Intensive Care and the Four Principles of Medical Ethics. Journal of Medical Ethics 39 (3):139-142.score: 75.0
    The chronic worldwide lack of organs for transplantation and the continuing improvement of strategies for in situ organ preservation have led to renewed interest in elective non-therapeutic ventilation of potential organ donors. Two types of situation may be eligible for elective intensive care: patients definitely evolving towards brain death and patients suitable as controlled non-heart beating organ donors after life-supporting therapies have been assessed as futile and withdrawn. Assessment of the ethical acceptability and the risks of these strategies is (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  43. Tamara Kohn & Rosemary McKechnie (eds.) (1999). Extending the Boundaries of Care: Medical Ethics and Caring Practices. Berg.score: 75.0
    How is the concept of patient care adapting in response to rapid changes in healthcare delivery and advances in medical technology? How are questions of ethical responsibility and social diversity shaping the definitions of healthcare? In this topical study, scholars in anthropology, nursing theory, law and ethics explore questions involving the changing relationship between patient care and medical ethics. Contributors address issues that challenge the boundaries of patient care, such as: · HIV-related care and (...)
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  44. David Lloyd (2005). Cases in Medical Ethics and Law. Cambridge University Press.score: 75.0
    This interactive independent teaching and learning tutorial can be used by individuals or small groups and takes a problem-based-learning approach to the complex legal and ethical issues raised by six scenarios. Based on real cases clearly demonstrating the problems arising from recent medical advancements, the cases cover reproductive technology, consent, genetic screening, participation in research trials, paternity and confidentiality. Additional features of the CD-ROM are a comprehensive glossary, cross-references to The Cambridge Medical Ethics Workbook and definitions from the (...)
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  45. James A. Marcum (2011). Care and Competence in Medical Practice: Francis Peabody Confronts Jason Posner. [REVIEW] Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 14 (2):143-153.score: 75.0
    In this paper, I discuss the role of care and competence, as well as their relationship to one another, in contemporary medical practice. I distinguish between two types of care. The first type, care1, represents a natural concern that motivates physicians to help or to act on the behalf of patients, i.e. to care about them. However, this care cannot guarantee the correct technical or right ethical action of physicians to meet the bodily and existential (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  46. Gavin H. Mooney & Alistair McGuire (eds.) (1988). Medical Ethics and Economics in Health Care. Oxford University Press.score: 75.0
    Providing health care in the most cost-effective way has become a priority in recent years. This book tackles the important issue of the potential conflict between economic expediency and the welfare of individual patients. Contributors examine different attitudes to this complex problem, along with a variety of legal and historical perspectives. The book addresses particular aspects of health care, such as medical expert systems, general practice, medical education, and clinical decision-making where the direct involvement of doctors (...)
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  47. David F. Walbert (1973). Abortion, Society, and the Law. Cleveland [Ohio]Press of Case Western Reserve University.score: 75.0
    George, B. J. Jr. The evolving law of abortion.--Guttmacher, A. F. The genesis of liberalized abortion in New York: a personal insight.--Callahan, D. Abortion: some ethical issues.--Jakobovits, I. Jewish views on abortion.--Drinan, R. F. The inviolability of the right to be born.--Schwartz, R. A. Abortion on request: the psychiatric implications.--Fleck, S. A psychiatrist's views on abortion.--Niswander, K. R. Abortion practices in the United States: a medical viewpoint.--Macintyre, M. N. Genetic risk, prenatal diagnosis, and selective abortion.--Messerman, G. A. Abortion counselling: (...)
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  48. Steven C. Schachter (ed.) (2008). Managing Relationships with Industry: A Physician's Compliance Manual. Elsevier.score: 74.0
    Background -- Overview of legal sources -- Summary of recent prosecutions and investigations -- Applications of law and professional and trade association standards to physician relationships with industry -- Legal and ethical aspects of specific physician's industry financial relationships -- Approaching and adopting effective compliance plans.
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  49. Micheline Garel, Laurence Caeymaex, François Goffinet, Marina Cuttini & Monique Kaminski (2011). Ethically Complex Decisions in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit: Impact of the New French Legislation on Attitudes and Practices of Physicians and Nurses. Journal of Medical Ethics 37 (4):240-243.score: 73.0
    Next SectionObjectives A statute enacted in 2005 modified the legislative framework of the rights of terminally ill persons in France. Ten years after the EURONIC study, which described the self-reported practices of neonatal caregivers towards ethical decision-making, a new study was conducted to assess the impact of the new law in neonatal intensive care units (NICU) and compare the results reported by EURONIC with current practices. Setting and design The study was carried out in the same two NICU as (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  50. Kenneth W. Goodman (ed.) (2010). The Case of Terri Schiavo: Ethics, Politics, and Death in the 21st Century. Oxford University Press.score: 72.5
    The case of Terri Schiavo, a young woman who spent 15 years in a persistent vegetative state, has emerged as a watershed in debates over end-of-life care. While many observers had thought the right to refuse medical treatment was well established, this case split a family, divided a nation, and counfounded physicians, legislators, and many of the people they treated or represented. In renewing debates over the importance of advance directives, the appropriate role of artificial hydration and nutrition, (...)
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
1 — 50 / 1000