Search results for 'Medical care Philosophy' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. James Giordano (2010). Respice...Prospice: Philosophy, Ethics and Medical Care- Past, Present, and Future. [REVIEW] Philosophy, Ethics, and Humanities in Medicine 5 (1):1-3.score: 531.0
    Respice...prospice: Philosophy, ethics and the character of medical care for the future.
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  2. Nance Cunningham Butler (1985). Applied Philosophy in Health Care Outside the Medical Ethics Arena. International Journal of Applied Philosophy 2 (3):75-80.score: 414.0
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  3. G. Mooney (1984). Medical Costs, Moral Choices, A Philosophy of Health Care Economics in America. Journal of Medical Ethics 10 (2):96-96.score: 414.0
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  4. Fiona Randall (2006). The Philosophy of Palliative Care: Critique and Reconstruction. Oxford University Press.score: 378.0
    It is a philosophy of patient care, and is therefore open to critique and evaluation.Using the Oxford Textbook of Palliative Medicine Third Edition as their ...
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  5. Michael Loughlin, Ross E. G. Upshur, Maya J. Goldenberg, Robyn Bluhm & Kirstin Borgerson (2010). Philosophy, Ethics, Medicine and Health Care: The Urgent Need for Critical Practice. Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 16 (2):249-259.score: 342.0
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  6. James A. Marcum (2011). Care and Competence in Medical Practice: Francis Peabody Confronts Jason Posner. [REVIEW] Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 14 (2):143-153.score: 324.0
    In this paper, I discuss the role of care and competence, as well as their relationship to one another, in contemporary medical practice. I distinguish between two types of care. The first type, care1, represents a natural concern that motivates physicians to help or to act on the behalf of patients, i.e. to care about them. However, this care cannot guarantee the correct technical or right ethical action of physicians to meet the bodily and existential (...)
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  7. William E. Stempsey (2007). Medical Humanities and Philosophy: Is the Universe Expanding or Contracting? [REVIEW] Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 10 (4):373-383.score: 324.0
    The question of whether the universe is expanding or contracting serves as a model for current questions facing the medical humanities. The medical humanities might aptly be described as a metamedical multiverse encompassing many separate universes of discourse, the most prominent of which is probably bioethics. Bioethics, however, is increasingly developing into a new interdisciplinary discipline, and threatens to engulf the other medical humanities, robbing them of their own distinctive contributions to metamedicine. The philosophy of medicine (...)
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  8. Samuel Gorovitz (1982/1985). Doctors' Dilemmas: Moral Conflict and Medical Care. Oxford University Press.score: 318.0
    Doctor's Dilemmas, a fascinating study of the moral dilemmas confronting health professionals and patients alike, examines areas of health care where ethical conflicts often arise. Gorovitz illuminates these conflicts by clearly explaining and applying a broad range of philosophical concepts. He lays the groundwork for informed ethical decision-making and provides the general reader with a lucid overview of the complexities of medical practice. Written in accessible, conversational style and making extensive use of anecdotes, examples, and references to literature, (...)
     
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  9. Tamara Kohn & Rosemary McKechnie (eds.) (1999). Extending the Boundaries of Care: Medical Ethics and Caring Practices. Berg.score: 318.0
    How is the concept of patient care adapting in response to rapid changes in healthcare delivery and advances in medical technology? How are questions of ethical responsibility and social diversity shaping the definitions of healthcare? In this topical study, scholars in anthropology, nursing theory, law and ethics explore questions involving the changing relationship between patient care and medical ethics. Contributors address issues that challenge the boundaries of patient care, such as: · HIV-related care and (...)
     
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  10. David C. Thomasma (2001). Personhood and Health Care. Kluwer Academic Pub..score: 300.0
    This book offers a rich variety of thoughtful explorations on the nature of the human person especially as related to health care, medicine, and mental health. Rarely are so many different viewpoints collected in one place about the intriguing puzzle that is the concept of person, human dignity, and the special place human beings hold in the goals of healing and the social structures of medical delivery. Ramifications of the theory of personhood are presented for bioethics, genetics, individuality, (...)
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  11. James Lindemann Nelson & JHilde Lindemann Nelson (eds.) (1999). Meaning and Medicine: A Reader in the Philosophy of Health Care. Routledge.score: 288.0
    Most available resources for teachers and students in biomedical ethics are based on a notion of medicine and of how to understand and illuminate its ethical problems that is at least two decades old. Meaning and Medicine dramatically expands the repertoire of resources for teachers and students of bioethics. In addition to providing fresh perspectives on both traditional and emerging questions in bioethics, this Reader focuses on questions in social philosophy, epistemology, and metaphysics as they are raised by developments (...)
     
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  12. William E. Stempsey (1999). The Quarantine of Philosophy in Medical Education: Why Teaching the Humanities May Not Produce Humane Physicians. Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 2 (1):3-9.score: 270.0
    Patients increasingly see physicians not as humane caregivers but as unfeeling technicians. The study of philosophy in medical school has been proposed to foster critical thinking about one's assumptions, perspectives and biases, encourage greater tolerance toward the ideas of others, and cultivate empathy. I suggest that the study of ethics and philosophy by medical students has failed to produce the humane physicians we seek because of the way the subject matter is quarantined in American medical (...)
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  13. Raimo Puustinen (1999). Bakhtin's Philosophy and Medical Practice — Toward a Semiotic Theory of Doctor — Patient Interaction. Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 2 (3):275-281.score: 270.0
    Doctor-patient interaction has gained increasing attention among sociologists and linguists during the last few decades. The problem with the studies performed so far, however, has been a lack of a theoretical framework which could bring together the various phenomena observed within medical consultations. Mikhail Bakhtin's philosophy of language offers us tools for studying medical practice as socio-cultural semiotic phenomenon. Applying Bakhtin's ideas of polyphonic, context-dependent and open-ended nature of human communication opens the possibilities to develop prevailing theoretical (...)
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  14. Zbigniew Zalewski (2000). What Philosophy Should Be Taught to the Future Medical Professionals? Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 3 (2):161-167.score: 270.0
    The presence of philosophy, amidst other humanities,within the body of medical education seems to raise no doubt nowadays. There are, however, some questions of a general nature to be discussed regarding the aforementioned fact. Three of them are of the greatest importance: (1) What image of medicine prevails in modern Western societies? (2)What ideals of medical professionals are commonly shared in these societies? (3) What is the intellectual background of the students of medico-related faculties? The real purposes (...)
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  15. F. Töpfer & U. Wiesing (2005). The Medical Theory of Richard Koch II: Natural Philosophy and History. [REVIEW] Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 8 (3):323-334.score: 270.0
    Richard Koch1 became known in the 1920s with works on basic medical theory. Among these publications, the character of medical action and its status within the theory of science was presented as the most important theme. While science is inherently driven by the pursuit of knowledge for its own sake, medicine pursues the practical purpose of helping the sick. Therefore, medicine must be seen as an active relationship between a helping and a suffering person. While elucidating this relationship, (...)
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  16. Gretchen B. Chapman & Frank A. Sonnenberg (eds.) (2000). Decision Making in Health Care: Theory, Psychology, and Applications. Cambridge University Press.score: 267.0
    Decision making is a crucial element in the field of medicine. The physician has to determine what is wrong with the patient and recommend treatment, while the patient has to decide whether or not to seek medical care, and go along with the treatment recommended by the physician. Health policy makers and health insurers have to decide what to promote, what to discourage, and what to pay for. Together, these decisions determine the quality of health care that (...)
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  17. Hisako Inaba (2008). A Comparative Case Study of American and Japanese Medical Care of a Terminally Ill Patient. Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 5:19-31.score: 261.0
    How is a terminally ill patient treated by the surrounding people in the U.S. and Japan? How does a terminally ill patient decide on his or her own treatment? These questions will be examined in a study of intensive medical care, received by a terminally ill Japanese cancer patient in the U.S. and Japan. This casereflects the participant observation by a Japanese anthropologist for about 8 years in the United States and Japan on one patient who was hospitalized (...)
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  18. Ian D. Coulter (1999). Chiropractic: A Philosophy for Alternative Health Care. Butterworth-Heinemann.score: 261.0
    An introductory text on the philosophy of chiropractic, for both chiropractic students and practitioners and those interested in the practice and philosophy of ...
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  19. Evert Van Leeuwen & Gerrit K. Kimsma (1997). Philosophy of Medical Practice: A Discursive Approach. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 18 (1-2).score: 261.0
    In spite of the seminal work A Philosophical Basis of Medical Practice, the debate on the task and goals of philosophy of medicine still continues. From an European perspective it is argued that the main topics dealt with by Pellegrino and Thomasma are still particularly relevant to medical practice as a healing practice, while expressing the need for a philosophy of medicine. Medical practice is a discursive practice which is highly influenced by other discursive practices (...)
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  20. Theresa Drought (1992). Justice and the Moral Acceptability of Rationing Medical Care: The Oregon Experiment. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 17 (1):97-117.score: 261.0
    The Oregon Basic Health Services Act of 1989 seeks to establish universal access to basic medical care for all currently uninsured Oregon residents. To control the increasing cost of medical care, the Oregon plan will restrict funding according to a priority list of medical interventions. The basic level of medical care provided to residents with incomes below the federal poverty line will vary according to the funds made available by the Oregon legislature. A (...)
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  21. Stephan W. Sahm (2000). Palliative Care Versus Euthanasia. The German Position: The German General Medical Council's Principles for Medical Care of the Terminally Ill. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 25 (2):195 – 219.score: 261.0
    In September 1998 the Bundesrztekammer, i.e., the German Medical Association, published new principles concerning terminal medical care. Even before publication, a draft of these principles was very controversial, and prompted intense public debate in the mass media. Despite some of the critics' suspicions that the principles prepared the way for liberalization of active euthanasia, euthanasia is unequivocally rejected in the principles. Physician-assisted suicide is considered to violate professional medical rules. In leaving aside some of the notions (...)
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  22. Stefan N. Willich & Susanna Elm (eds.) (2001). Medical Challenges for the New Millennium: An Interdisciplinary Task. Kluwer Academic Publishers.score: 261.0
    Today the medical community faces a number of pressing issues. Molecular and high-tech medicine, despite their tremendous successes, also burden us with new ethical dilemmas: when and how to die, whose life to preserve, whether to modify genes and to create life, and how to pay for it all. Furthermore, alternative methods appear to work at least for certain disorders. They are popular and definitely cost less, while the spiraling costs of conventional medicine have led to the development of (...)
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  23. R. M. Nelson & T. Drought (1992). Justice and the Moral Acceptability of Rationing Medical Care: The Oregon Experiment. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 17 (1):97-117.score: 261.0
    The Oregon Basic Health Services Act of 1989 seeks to establish universal access to basic medical care for all currently uninsured Oregon residents. To control the increasing cost of medical care, the Oregon plan will restrict funding according to a priority list of medical interventions. The basic level of medical care provided to residents with incomes below the federal poverty line will vary according to the funds made available by the Oregon legislature. A (...)
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  24. Claude Debru (2011). The Concept of Normativity From Philosophy to Medicine: An Overview. Medicine Studies 3 (1):1-7.score: 255.0
    In this introductory paper, I try to give an overview of the concept of normativity in its philosophical history and its contemporary interpretations and uses in different fields. From philosophy of logic and mathematics to philosophy of language and mind, and to philosophy of medicine and care, normativity is found as a key concept pointing at the possibility of scientific and technical progress and improvement of human life in the interaction between the individual and his environment.
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  25. Donna L. Dickenson & Michael J. Parker (1999). The European Biomedical Ethics Practitioner Education Project: An Experiential Approach to Philosophy and Ethics in Health Care Education. Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 2 (3):231-237.score: 252.0
    The European Biomedical Ethics Practitioner Education Project (EBEPE), funded by the BIOMED programme of the European Commission, is a five-nation partnership to produce open learning materials for healthcare ethics education. Papers and case studies from a series of twelve conferences throughout the European Union, reflecting the ‘burning issues’ in the participants' healthcare systems, have been collected by a team based at Imperial College, London, where they are now being edited into a series of seven activity-based workbooks for individual or group (...)
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  26. William E. Stempsey (2007). Medical Humanities: Introduction to the Theme. [REVIEW] Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 10 (4):359-361.score: 246.0
    The Twentieth European Conference on Philosophy of Medicine and Health Care was held in Helsinki, Finland, in August 2006 and highlighted the theme “Medicine, Philosophy and the Humanities.” The four papers in this thematic section are developed from presentations made at that conference.They are the work of physicians and philosophers and present fundamentally philosophical reflections on the medical humanities. The authors show that philosophy offers both a substantial way of humanizing the theory and practice of (...)
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  27. Fredrik Svenaeus (2000). The Hermeneutics of Medicine and the Phenomenology of Health: Steps Towards a Philosophy of Medical Practice. Kluwer Academic Publishers.score: 239.0
    Fredrik Svenaeus' book is a delight to read. Not only does he exhibit keen understanding of a wide range of topics and figures in both medicine and philosophy, but he manages to bring them together in an innovative manner that convincingly demonstrates how deeply these two significant fields can be and, in the end, must be mutually enlightening. Medicine, Svenaeus suggests, reveals deep but rarely explicit themes whose proper comprehension invites a careful phenomenological and hermeneutical explication. Certain philosophical approaches, (...)
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  28. Sandra J. Tanenbaum (2013). What is Patient-Centered Care? A Typology of Models and Missions. Health Care Analysis:1-16.score: 237.0
    Recently adopted health care practices and policies describe themselves as “patient-centered care.” The meaning of the term, however, remains contested and obscure. This paper offers a typology of “patient-centered care” models that aims to contribute to greater clarity about, continuing discussion of, and further advances in patient-centered care. The paper imposes an original analytic framework on extensive material covering mostly US health care and health policy topics over several decades. It finds that four models of (...)
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  29. Elisabeth Conradi, Nikola Biller-Andorno, Margarete Boos, Christina Sommer & Claudia Wiesemann (2003). Gender in Medical Ethics: Re-Examining the Conceptual Basis of Empirical Research. Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 6 (1):51-58.score: 234.0
    Conducting empirical research on gender in medical ethics is a challenge from a theoretical as well as a practical point of view. It still has to be clarified how gender aspects can be integrated without sustaining gender stereotypes. The developmental psychologist Carol Gilligan was among the first to question ethics from a gendered point of view. The notion of care introduced by her challenged conventional developmental psychology as well as moral philosophy. Gilligan was criticised, however, because her (...)
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  30. Imrana Qadeer & Sunita Reddy (2013). Medical Tourism in India: Perceptions of Physicians in Tertiary Care Hospitals. Philosophy, Ethics, and Humanities in Medicine 8 (1):20.score: 231.0
    Senior physicians of modern medicine in India play a key role in shaping policies and public opinion and institutional management. This paper explores their perceptions of medical tourism (MT) within India which is a complex process involving international demands and policy shifts from service to commercialisation of health care for trade, gross domestic profit, and foreign exchange. Through interviews of 91 physicians in tertiary care hospitals in three cities of India, this paper explores four areas of concern: (...)
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  31. Krystyna Adams, Jeremy Snyder, Valorie A. Crooks & Rory Johnston (2013). Promoting Social Responsibility Amongst Health Care Users: Medical Tourists' Perspectives on an Information Sheet Regarding Ethical Concerns in Medical Tourism. Philosophy, Ethics, and Humanities in Medicine 8 (1):19.score: 231.0
    Medical tourists, persons that travel across international borders with the intention to access non-emergency medical care, may not be adequately informed of safety and ethical concerns related to the practice of medical tourism. Researchers indicate that the sources of information frequently used by medical tourists during their decision-making process may be biased and/or lack comprehensive information regarding individual safety and treatment outcomes, as well as potential impacts of the medical tourism industry on third parties. (...)
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  32. K. W. M. Fulford (1989). Moral Theory and Medical Practice. Cambridge University Press.score: 228.0
    In this unique study Fulford combines the disciplines of rigorous philosophy with an intimate knowledge of psychopathology to overturn traditional hegemonies. The patient replaces the doctor at the heart of medicine. Moral theory and the logic of evaluation replace epistemology as the focus of philosophical enquiry. Ever controversial, mental illness is at the interface of philosophy and medicine. Mad or bad? Dissident or diseased? Dr Fulford shows that it is possible to achieve new insights into these traditional dilemmas, (...)
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  33. German Medical Association (2000). Principles of the German Medical Association Concerning Terminal Medical Care. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 25 (2):254-58.score: 228.0
     
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  34. Kenneth DeVille & Loretta M. Kopelman (2003). Diversity, Trust, and Patient Care: Affirmative Action in Medical Education 25 Years After Bakke. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 28 (4):489 – 516.score: 225.0
    The U.S. Supreme Court's seminal 1978 Bakke decision, now 25 years old, has an ambiguous and endangered legacy. Justice Lewis Powell's opinion provided a justification that allowed leaders in medical education to pursue some affirmative action policies while at the same time undermining many other potential defenses. Powell asserted that medical schools might have a "compelling interest" in the creation of a diverse student body. But Powell's compromise jeopardized affirmative action since it blocked many justifications for responding (...)
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  35. George Khushf (1999). The Case for Managed Care: Reappraising Medical and Socio-Political Ideals. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 24 (5):415 – 433.score: 225.0
    The arguments against managed care can be divided into two general clusters. One cluster concerns the way managed care undermines the ethical ideals of medical professionalism. Since those ideals largely focus on the physician-patient relation, the first cluster comes under the rubric of micro-ethics; namely, the ethics of individual-individual relations. The second cluster of criticisms focuses on macro-ethical issues, primarily on issues of justice and policy. By reviewing these arguments, it becomes clear that managed care does (...)
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  36. Carlo Leget, Chris Gastmans & Marian Verkerk (eds.) (2011). Care, Compassion and Recognition: An Ethical Discussion. Peeters.score: 225.0
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  37. Norman Daniels (1998). Symposium on the Rationing of Health Care: 2 Rationing Medical Care — A Philosopher's Perspective on Outcomes and Process. Economics and Philosophy 14 (01):27-.score: 219.0
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  38. Peter Diamond (1998). Symposium on the Rationing of Health Care: 1 Rationing Medical Care — An Economist's Perspective. Economics and Philosophy 14 (01):1-.score: 219.0
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  39. Albert Weale (2012). The Right to Health Versus Good Medical Care? Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 15 (4):473-493.score: 219.0
    There are two discourses that are used in connection with the provision of good healthcare: a rights discourse and a beneficial design discourse. Although the logical force of these two discourses overlaps, they have distinct and incompatible implications for practical reasoning about health policy. The language of rights can be interpreted as the ground of a well-designed healthcare system stressing the values of equality and inclusion, but it has less application when dealing with questions of cost-effectiveness. This difference reflects the (...)
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  40. John S. Furler & Victoria J. Palmer (2010). The Ethics of Everyday Practice in Primary Medical Care: Responding to Social Health Inequities. Philosophy, Ethics, and Humanities in Medicine 5 (1):1-8.score: 219.0
    Social and structural inequities shape health and illness; they are an everyday presence within the doctor-patient encounter yet, there is limited ethical guidance on what individual physicians should do. This paper draws on a study that explored how doctors and their professional associations ought to respond to the issue of social health inequities.
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  41. Steven Edwards (2007). Rationing Medical Care on the Basis of Age: The Moral Dimensions. Nursing Philosophy 8 (2):142–143.score: 219.0
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  42. Joseph Agassi (2007). On the Ethics of Medical Care Under Resource Constraints. Spontaneous Generations: A Journal for the History and Philosophy of Science 1 (1):4.score: 219.0
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  43. Andrew Ward (1983). Medical Care on a Balanced Diet. Philosophy 58 (225):396 - 398.score: 219.0
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  44. John McKie (1999). Daniels on Rationing Medical Care. Economics and Philosophy 15 (01):109-.score: 219.0
  45. Evelyn Ackerman (1983). Medical Care in the Countryside Near Paris, 1800-1914. In Joseph Warren Dauben & Virginia Staudt Sexton (eds.), History and Philosophy of Science: Selected Papers. New York Academy of Sciences.score: 219.0
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  46. Robert Card (2006). Medical Care at the End of Life. Philosophy Now 55:14-17.score: 219.0
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  47. Charles Foster (2009). Choosing Life, Choosing Death: The Tyranny of Autonomy in Medical Ethics and Law. Hart Pub..score: 219.0
  48. Jodi Halpern (2013). Empowering Patients is Good Medical Care. Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 20 (2):179-181.score: 219.0
    Walter and Ross rightfully argue that healthcare providers need to employ a less authoritarian, more empowering approach if they want to support patients’ behavioral changes. They show how motivational interviewing (MI), informed by self-determination theory, engages patients and thus may inspire enduring changes. They ground these interventions in an important, new model of relational autonomy, emphasizing the patient’s self-respect and self-cohesion as well as self-determination, and they show how patient–provider interactions influence these three aspects of autonomy. It may be surprising (...)
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  49. Ivan Illich (1976/1982). Medical Nemesis: The Expropriation of Health. Pantheon Books.score: 219.0
     
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  50. George J. Agich (1993). Autonomy and Long-Term Care. Oxford University Press.score: 216.0
    The realities and myths of long-term care and the challenges it poses for the ethics of autonomy are analyzed in this perceptive work. The book defends the concept of autonomy, but argues that the standard view of autonomy as non-interference and independence has only a limited applicability for long term care. The treatment of actual autonomy stresses the developmental and social nature of human persons and the priority of identification over autonomous choice. The work balances analysis of the (...)
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