Search results for 'Medical care Philosophy' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. James Giordano (2010). Respice...Prospice: Philosophy, Ethics and Medical Care- Past, Present, and Future. [REVIEW] Philosophy, Ethics, and Humanities in Medicine 5 (1):1-3.score: 119.0
    Respice...prospice: Philosophy, ethics and the character of medical care for the future.
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  2. Fiona Randall (2006). The Philosophy of Palliative Care: Critique and Reconstruction. Oxford University Press.score: 102.0
    It is a philosophy of patient care, and is therefore open to critique and evaluation.Using the Oxford Textbook of Palliative Medicine Third Edition as their ...
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  3. David C. Thomasma (2001). Personhood and Health Care. Kluwer Academic Pub..score: 94.0
    This book offers a rich variety of thoughtful explorations on the nature of the human person especially as related to health care, medicine, and mental health. Rarely are so many different viewpoints collected in one place about the intriguing puzzle that is the concept of person, human dignity, and the special place human beings hold in the goals of healing and the social structures of medical delivery. Ramifications of the theory of personhood are presented for bioethics, genetics, individuality, (...)
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  4. Michael Loughlin, Ross E. G. Upshur, Maya J. Goldenberg, Robyn Bluhm & Kirstin Borgerson (2010). Philosophy, Ethics, Medicine and Health Care: The Urgent Need for Critical Practice. Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 16 (2):249-259.score: 90.0
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  5. G. Mooney (1984). Medical Costs, Moral Choices, A Philosophy of Health Care Economics in America. Journal of Medical Ethics 10 (2):96-96.score: 84.0
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  6. Nance Cunningham Butler (1985). Applied Philosophy in Health Care Outside the Medical Ethics Arena. International Journal of Applied Philosophy 2 (3):75-80.score: 84.0
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  7. James A. Marcum (2011). Care and Competence in Medical Practice: Francis Peabody Confronts Jason Posner. [REVIEW] Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 14 (2):143-153.score: 84.0
    In this paper, I discuss the role of care and competence, as well as their relationship to one another, in contemporary medical practice. I distinguish between two types of care. The first type, care1, represents a natural concern that motivates physicians to help or to act on the behalf of patients, i.e. to care about them. However, this care cannot guarantee the correct technical or right ethical action of physicians to meet the bodily and existential (...)
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  8. William E. Stempsey (2007). Medical Humanities and Philosophy: Is the Universe Expanding or Contracting? [REVIEW] Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 10 (4):373-383.score: 84.0
    The question of whether the universe is expanding or contracting serves as a model for current questions facing the medical humanities. The medical humanities might aptly be described as a metamedical multiverse encompassing many separate universes of discourse, the most prominent of which is probably bioethics. Bioethics, however, is increasingly developing into a new interdisciplinary discipline, and threatens to engulf the other medical humanities, robbing them of their own distinctive contributions to metamedicine. The philosophy of medicine (...)
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  9. Gretchen B. Chapman & Frank A. Sonnenberg (eds.) (2000). Decision Making in Health Care: Theory, Psychology, and Applications. Cambridge University Press.score: 83.0
    Decision making is a crucial element in the field of medicine. The physician has to determine what is wrong with the patient and recommend treatment, while the patient has to decide whether or not to seek medical care, and go along with the treatment recommended by the physician. Health policy makers and health insurers have to decide what to promote, what to discourage, and what to pay for. Together, these decisions determine the quality of health care that (...)
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  10. Tamara Kohn & Rosemary McKechnie (eds.) (1999). Extending the Boundaries of Care: Medical Ethics and Caring Practices. Berg.score: 82.0
    How is the concept of patient care adapting in response to rapid changes in healthcare delivery and advances in medical technology? How are questions of ethical responsibility and social diversity shaping the definitions of healthcare? In this topical study, scholars in anthropology, nursing theory, law and ethics explore questions involving the changing relationship between patient care and medical ethics. Contributors address issues that challenge the boundaries of patient care, such as: · HIV-related care and (...)
     
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  11. Stefan N. Willich & Susanna Elm (eds.) (2001). Medical Challenges for the New Millennium: An Interdisciplinary Task. Kluwer Academic Publishers.score: 81.0
    Today the medical community faces a number of pressing issues. Molecular and high-tech medicine, despite their tremendous successes, also burden us with new ethical dilemmas: when and how to die, whose life to preserve, whether to modify genes and to create life, and how to pay for it all. Furthermore, alternative methods appear to work at least for certain disorders. They are popular and definitely cost less, while the spiraling costs of conventional medicine have led to the development of (...)
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  12. Claude Debru (2011). The Concept of Normativity From Philosophy to Medicine: An Overview. Medicine Studies 3 (1):1-7.score: 79.0
    In this introductory paper, I try to give an overview of the concept of normativity in its philosophical history and its contemporary interpretations and uses in different fields. From philosophy of logic and mathematics to philosophy of language and mind, and to philosophy of medicine and care, normativity is found as a key concept pointing at the possibility of scientific and technical progress and improvement of human life in the interaction between the individual and his environment.
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  13. Lawrence Schneiderman (2011). Defining Medical Futility and Improving Medical Care. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 8 (2):123-131.score: 78.0
    It probably should not be surprising, in this time of soaring medical costs and proliferating technology, that an intense debate has arisen over the concept of medical futility. Should doctors be doing all the things they are doing? In particular, should they be attempting treatments that have little likelihood of achieving the goals of medicine? What are the goals of medicine? Can we agree when medical treatment fails to achieve such goals? What should the physician do and (...)
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  14. Samuel Gorovitz (1982/1985). Doctors' Dilemmas: Moral Conflict and Medical Care. Oxford University Press.score: 78.0
    Doctor's Dilemmas, a fascinating study of the moral dilemmas confronting health professionals and patients alike, examines areas of health care where ethical conflicts often arise. Gorovitz illuminates these conflicts by clearly explaining and applying a broad range of philosophical concepts. He lays the groundwork for informed ethical decision-making and provides the general reader with a lucid overview of the complexities of medical practice. Written in accessible, conversational style and making extensive use of anecdotes, examples, and references to literature, (...)
     
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  15. Fredrik Svenaeus (2000). The Hermeneutics of Medicine and the Phenomenology of Health: Steps Towards a Philosophy of Medical Practice. Kluwer Academic Publishers.score: 77.0
    Fredrik Svenaeus' book is a delight to read. Not only does he exhibit keen understanding of a wide range of topics and figures in both medicine and philosophy, but he manages to bring them together in an innovative manner that convincingly demonstrates how deeply these two significant fields can be and, in the end, must be mutually enlightening. Medicine, Svenaeus suggests, reveals deep but rarely explicit themes whose proper comprehension invites a careful phenomenological and hermeneutical explication. Certain philosophical approaches, (...)
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  16. Gert Olthuis & Wim Dekkers (2005). Quality of Life Considered as Well-Being: Views From Philosophy and Palliative Care Practice. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 26 (4):307-337.score: 76.0
    The main measure of quality of life is well-being. The aim of this article is to compare insights about well-being from contemporary philosophy with the practice-related opinions of palliative care professionals. In the first part of the paper two philosophical theories on well-being are introduced: Sumner’s theory of authentic happiness and Griffin’s theory of prudential perfectionism. The second part presents opinions derived from interviews with 19 professional palliative caregivers. Both the well-being of patients and the well-being of the (...)
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  17. Gavin H. Mooney & Alistair McGuire (eds.) (1988). Medical Ethics and Economics in Health Care. Oxford University Press.score: 76.0
    Providing health care in the most cost-effective way has become a priority in recent years. This book tackles the important issue of the potential conflict between economic expediency and the welfare of individual patients. Contributors examine different attitudes to this complex problem, along with a variety of legal and historical perspectives. The book addresses particular aspects of health care, such as medical expert systems, general practice, medical education, and clinical decision-making where the direct involvement of doctors (...)
     
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  18. William E. Stempsey (2007). Medical Humanities: Introduction to the Theme. [REVIEW] Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 10 (4):359-361.score: 76.0
    The Twentieth European Conference on Philosophy of Medicine and Health Care was held in Helsinki, Finland, in August 2006 and highlighted the theme “Medicine, Philosophy and the Humanities.” The four papers in this thematic section are developed from presentations made at that conference.They are the work of physicians and philosophers and present fundamentally philosophical reflections on the medical humanities. The authors show that philosophy offers both a substantial way of humanizing the theory and practice of (...)
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  19. Brian McKenna (2012). The Clash of Medical Civilizations: Experiencing “Primary Care” in a Neoliberal Culture. [REVIEW] Journal of Medical Humanities 33 (4):255-272.score: 75.0
    An anthropologist describes how he found himself at the vortex of a “clash of medical civilizations:” neoliberalism and the international primary health care movement. His involvement in a $6 million social change initiative in medical education became a basis to unlock the hidden tensions, contradictions and movements within the “primary care” phenomenon. The essay is structured on five ethnographic stories, situated on a continuum from “natural” species-level primary care to “unnatural” neoliberal primary care. Food (...)
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  20. A. Baumann, G. Audibert, C. G. Lafaye, L. Puybasset, P. -M. Mertes & F. Claudot (2013). Elective Non-Therapeutic Intensive Care and the Four Principles of Medical Ethics. Journal of Medical Ethics 39 (3):139-142.score: 75.0
    The chronic worldwide lack of organs for transplantation and the continuing improvement of strategies for in situ organ preservation have led to renewed interest in elective non-therapeutic ventilation of potential organ donors. Two types of situation may be eligible for elective intensive care: patients definitely evolving towards brain death and patients suitable as controlled non-heart beating organ donors after life-supporting therapies have been assessed as futile and withdrawn. Assessment of the ethical acceptability and the risks of these strategies is (...)
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  21. J. de Boer, G. van Blijderveen, G. van Dijk, H. J. Duivenvoorden & M. Williams (2012). Implementing Structured, Multiprofessional Medical Ethical Decision-Making in a Neonatal Intensive Care Unit. Journal of Medical Ethics 38 (10):596-601.score: 75.0
    Background In neonatal intensive care, a child's death is often preceded by a medical decision. Nurses, social workers and pastors, however, are often excluded from ethical case deliberation. If multiprofessional ethical case deliberations do take place, participants may not always know how to perform to the fullest. Setting A level-IIID neonatal intensive care unit of a paediatric teaching hospital in the Netherlands. Methods Structured multiprofessional medical ethical decision-making (MEDM) was implemented to help overcome problems experienced. Important (...)
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  22. Sandra J. Tanenbaum (2013). What is Patient-Centered Care? A Typology of Models and Missions. Health Care Analysis:1-16.score: 73.0
    Recently adopted health care practices and policies describe themselves as “patient-centered care.” The meaning of the term, however, remains contested and obscure. This paper offers a typology of “patient-centered care” models that aims to contribute to greater clarity about, continuing discussion of, and further advances in patient-centered care. The paper imposes an original analytic framework on extensive material covering mostly US health care and health policy topics over several decades. It finds that four models of (...)
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  23. Raymond Anthony (2012). Building a Sustainable Future for Animal Agriculture: An Environmental Virtue Ethic of Care Approach Within the Philosophy of Technology. [REVIEW] Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 25 (2):123-144.score: 72.0
    Agricultural technologies are non-neutral and ethical challenges are posed by these technologies themselves. The technologies we use or endorse are embedded with values and norms and reflect the shape of our moral character. They can literally make us better or worse consumers and/or people. Looking back, when the world’s developed nations welcomed and steadily embraced industrialization as the dominant paradigm for agriculture a half century or so ago, they inadvertently championed a philosophy of technology that promotes an insular human-centricism, (...)
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  24. Elisabeth Conradi, Nikola Biller-Andorno, Margarete Boos, Christina Sommer & Claudia Wiesemann (2003). Gender in Medical Ethics: Re-Examining the Conceptual Basis of Empirical Research. Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 6 (1):51-58.score: 72.0
    Conducting empirical research on gender in medical ethics is a challenge from a theoretical as well as a practical point of view. It still has to be clarified how gender aspects can be integrated without sustaining gender stereotypes. The developmental psychologist Carol Gilligan was among the first to question ethics from a gendered point of view. The notion of care introduced by her challenged conventional developmental psychology as well as moral philosophy. Gilligan was criticised, however, because her (...)
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  25. Mats Hansson (2012). Where Should We Draw the Line Between Quality of Care and Other Ethical Concerns Related to Medical Registries and Biobanks? Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 33 (4):313-323.score: 72.0
    Together with large biobanks of human samples, medical registries with aggregated data from many clinical centers are vital parts of an infrastructure for maintaining high standards of quality with regard to medical diagnosis and treatment. The rapid development in personalized medicine and pharmaco-genomics only underscores the future need for these infrastructures. However, registries and biobanks have been criticized as constituting great risks to individual privacy. In this article, I suggest that quality with regard to diagnosis and treatment is (...)
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  26. James Lindemann Nelson & JHilde Lindemann Nelson (eds.) (1999). Meaning and Medicine: A Reader in the Philosophy of Health Care. Routledge.score: 72.0
    Most available resources for teachers and students in biomedical ethics are based on a notion of medicine and of how to understand and illuminate its ethical problems that is at least two decades old. Meaning and Medicine dramatically expands the repertoire of resources for teachers and students of bioethics. In addition to providing fresh perspectives on both traditional and emerging questions in bioethics, this Reader focuses on questions in social philosophy, epistemology, and metaphysics as they are raised by developments (...)
     
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  27. C. Sommer, M. Boos, E. Conradi, N. Biller-Andorno & C. Wiesemann (2011). Care and Justice Arguments in the Ethical Reasoning of Medical Students. Ramon Llull Journal of Applied Ethics 1 (2):9.score: 72.0
    Objectives: To gather empirical data on how gender and educational level influence bioethical reasoning among medical students by analyzing their use of care versus justice arguments for reconciling a bioethical dilemma. Setting: University Departments of Medical Ethics, Social and Communication Psychology in Germany. Participants: First and fifth year medical students. Design and method: Multidisciplinary, empirical, 2-segment study of ethics in action: In intrapersonal Segment 1, the students were presented with a bioethical dilemma and then administered a (...)
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  28. K. W. M. Fulford (1989). Moral Theory and Medical Practice. Cambridge University Press.score: 70.0
    In this unique study Fulford combines the disciplines of rigorous philosophy with an intimate knowledge of psychopathology to overturn traditional hegemonies. The patient replaces the doctor at the heart of medicine. Moral theory and the logic of evaluation replace epistemology as the focus of philosophical enquiry. Ever controversial, mental illness is at the interface of philosophy and medicine. Mad or bad? Dissident or diseased? Dr Fulford shows that it is possible to achieve new insights into these traditional dilemmas, (...)
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  29. John D. Lantos (1997). Do We Still Need Doctors? Routledge.score: 70.0
    Written with poignancy and compassion, Do We Still Need Doctors? is a personal account from the front lines of the moral and political battles that are reshaping America's health care system. Using compelling firsthand experiences, clinical vignettes, and moral arguments, John D. Lantos, a pediatrician, asks whether, as we proceed with the redesign of our health care system, doctors will -- or should -- continue to fulfill the roles and responsibilities that they have in the past. Interspersing moving (...)
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  30. Robert M. Veatch (2009). Patient, Heal Thyself: How the New Medicine Puts the Patient in Charge. Oxford University Press.score: 70.0
    The puzzling case of the broken arm -- Hernias, diets, and drugs -- Why physicians cannot know what will benefit patients -- Sacrificing patient benefit to protect patient rights -- Societal interests and duties to others -- The new, limited, twenty-first-century role for physicians as patient assistants -- Abandoning modern medical concepts: doctor's "orders" and hospital "discharge" -- Medicine can't "indicate": so why do we talk that way? --"Treatments of choice" and "medical necessity": who is fooling whom? -- (...)
     
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  31. Michel Wensing, Björn Broge, Petra Kaufmann‐Kolle, Edith Andres & Joachim Szecsenyi (2004). Quality Circles to Improve Prescribing Patterns in Primary Medical Care: What is Their Actual Impact? Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 10 (3):457-466.score: 70.0
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  32. Carlo Leget, Chris Gastmans & Marian Verkerk (eds.) (2011). Care, Compassion and Recognition: An Ethical Discussion. Peeters.score: 69.0
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  33. Martyn Evans (2001). The 'Medical Body' as Philosophy's Arena. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 22 (1):17-32.score: 67.0
    Medicine, as Byron Good argues, reconstitutes thehuman body of our daily experience as a medical body,unfamiliar outside medicine. This reconstitution can be seen intwo ways: (i) as a salutary reminder of the extent to which thereality even of the human body is constructed; and (ii) as anarena for what Stephen Toulmin distinguishes as theintersection of natural science and history, in which many ofphilosophy''s traditional (and traditionally abstract) questionsare given concrete and urgent form.This paper begins by examining a number of (...)
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  34. Charles Foster (2009). Choosing Life, Choosing Death: The Tyranny of Autonomy in Medical Ethics and Law. Hart Pub..score: 67.0
  35. Ivan Illich (1976/1982). Medical Nemesis: The Expropriation of Health. Pantheon Books.score: 67.0
     
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  36. George J. Agich (1993). Autonomy and Long-Term Care. Oxford University Press.score: 66.0
    The realities and myths of long-term care and the challenges it poses for the ethics of autonomy are analyzed in this perceptive work. The book defends the concept of autonomy, but argues that the standard view of autonomy as non-interference and independence has only a limited applicability for long term care. The treatment of actual autonomy stresses the developmental and social nature of human persons and the priority of identification over autonomous choice. The work balances analysis of the (...)
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  37. Alan Barnard (2002). Philosophy of Technology and Nursing. Nursing Philosophy 3 (1):15–26.score: 66.0
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  38. William E. Stempsey (1999). The Quarantine of Philosophy in Medical Education: Why Teaching the Humanities May Not Produce Humane Physicians. Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 2 (1):3-9.score: 66.0
    Patients increasingly see physicians not as humane caregivers but as unfeeling technicians. The study of philosophy in medical school has been proposed to foster critical thinking about one's assumptions, perspectives and biases, encourage greater tolerance toward the ideas of others, and cultivate empathy. I suggest that the study of ethics and philosophy by medical students has failed to produce the humane physicians we seek because of the way the subject matter is quarantined in American medical (...)
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  39. Raimo Puustinen (1999). Bakhtin's Philosophy and Medical Practice — Toward a Semiotic Theory of Doctor — Patient Interaction. Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 2 (3):275-281.score: 66.0
    Doctor-patient interaction has gained increasing attention among sociologists and linguists during the last few decades. The problem with the studies performed so far, however, has been a lack of a theoretical framework which could bring together the various phenomena observed within medical consultations. Mikhail Bakhtin's philosophy of language offers us tools for studying medical practice as socio-cultural semiotic phenomenon. Applying Bakhtin's ideas of polyphonic, context-dependent and open-ended nature of human communication opens the possibilities to develop prevailing theoretical (...)
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  40. Zbigniew Zalewski (2000). What Philosophy Should Be Taught to the Future Medical Professionals? Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 3 (2):161-167.score: 66.0
    The presence of philosophy, amidst other humanities,within the body of medical education seems to raise no doubt nowadays. There are, however, some questions of a general nature to be discussed regarding the aforementioned fact. Three of them are of the greatest importance: (1) What image of medicine prevails in modern Western societies? (2)What ideals of medical professionals are commonly shared in these societies? (3) What is the intellectual background of the students of medico-related faculties? The real purposes (...)
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  41. F. Töpfer & U. Wiesing (2005). The Medical Theory of Richard Koch II: Natural Philosophy and History. [REVIEW] Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 8 (3):323-334.score: 66.0
    Richard Koch1 became known in the 1920s with works on basic medical theory. Among these publications, the character of medical action and its status within the theory of science was presented as the most important theme. While science is inherently driven by the pursuit of knowledge for its own sake, medicine pursues the practical purpose of helping the sick. Therefore, medicine must be seen as an active relationship between a helping and a suffering person. While elucidating this relationship, (...)
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  42. Thomas J. Papadimos, Joanna E. Manos & Stuart J. Murray (2013). An Extrapolation of Foucault's Technologies of the Self to Effect Positive Transformation in the Intensivist as Teacher and Mentor. Philosophy, Ethics, and Humanities in Medicine 8 (1):7.score: 64.0
    In critical care medicine, teaching and mentoring practices are extremely important in regard to attracting and retaining young trainees and faculty in this important subspecialty that has a scarcity of needed personnel in the USA. To this end, we argue that Foucault’s Technologies of the Self is critical background reading when endeavoring to effect the positive transformation of faculty into effective teachers and mentors.
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  43. Mansoor Elahi (2011). Medical Ethics: A Practical Guide to Patient Care, Related Ethics, Conventions and Laws. Mtro Medical Publishing.score: 64.0
     
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  44. Edmund D. Pellegrino (2008). The Philosophy of Medicine Reborn: A Pellegrino Reader. University of Notre Dame Press.score: 64.0
    What the philosophy of medicine is -- Philosophy of medicine: should it be teleologically or socially construed? -- The internal morality of clinical medicine: a paradigm for the ethics of the helping and healing professions -- Humanistic basis of professional ethics -- The commodification of medical and health care: the moral consequences of a paradigm shift from a professional to a market ethic -- Medicine today: its identity, its role, and the role of physicians -- From (...)
     
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  45. Reinhard Priester (ed.) (1989). Rethinking Medical Morality: The Ethical Implications of Changes in Health Care Organization, Delivery, and Financing. Center for Biomedical Ethics, University of Minnesota.score: 64.0
     
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  46. Matt Commers (2002). Determinants of Health: Theory, Understanding, Portrayal, Policy. Kluwer Academic Publishers.score: 63.0
    For decades, health professionals have asserted the importance of public participation in interventions for health. Medicine has pursued patient participation in clinical decision-making. In the public health realm, target groups have been asked to assist in the design and implementation of initiatives for health. In practice, however, patients and populations expect health professionals to give advice and - in some cases - to make decisions on their behalf. This implies limits to the ideal of participation. In this innovative work, the (...)
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  47. Evert Van Leeuwen & Gerrit K. Kimsma (1997). Philosophy of Medical Practice: A Discursive Approach. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 18 (1-2).score: 63.0
    In spite of the seminal work A Philosophical Basis of Medical Practice, the debate on the task and goals of philosophy of medicine still continues. From an European perspective it is argued that the main topics dealt with by Pellegrino and Thomasma are still particularly relevant to medical practice as a healing practice, while expressing the need for a philosophy of medicine. Medical practice is a discursive practice which is highly influenced by other discursive practices (...)
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  48. Ian D. Coulter (1999). Chiropractic: A Philosophy for Alternative Health Care. Butterworth-Heinemann.score: 63.0
    An introductory text on the philosophy of chiropractic, for both chiropractic students and practitioners and those interested in the practice and philosophy of ...
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  49. David J. Casarett (1999). Moral Perception and the Pursuit of Medical Philosophy. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 20 (2):125-139.score: 63.0
    This paper begins by examining the claim that the practice of medicine is essentially a moral endeavor. According to this view, all clinical practice has moral content, and each clinical situation has a moral dimension. I suggest that in order to recognize this moral dimension, clinicians must engage in an interpretive process, and that they must be able to interpret clinical data in ethical terms. However, clinicians often lack the ‘moral perception’ required to appreciate this moral dimension. I will argue (...)
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  50. Jessica Price & Agnes Binagwaho (2010). From Medical Rationing to Rationalizing the Use of Human Resources for Aids Care and Treatment in Africa: A Case for Task Shifting. Developing World Bioethics 10 (2):99-103.score: 63.0
    With a global commitment to scaling up AIDS care and treatment in resource-poor settings for some of the most HIV-affected countries in Africa, availability of antiretroviral treatment is no longer the principal obstacle to expanding access to treatment. A shortage of trained healthcare personnel to initiate treatment and manage patients represents a more challenging barrier to offering life-saving treatment to all patients in need. Physician-centered treatment policies accentuate this challenge. Despite evidence that task shifting for nurse-centered AIDS patient (...) is effective and can alleviate severe physician shortages that currently obstruct treatment scale-up, political commitment and policy action to support task shifting models of care has been slow to absent. In this paper we review the evidence in support of task shifting for AIDS treatment in Africa and argue that continued policy inaction amounts to unwarranted healthcare rationing and as such is ethically untenable. (shrink)
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