Search results for 'Medical care Psychological aspects' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Gretchen B. Chapman & Frank A. Sonnenberg (eds.) (2000). Decision Making in Health Care: Theory, Psychology, and Applications. Cambridge University Press.score: 148.5
    Decision making is a crucial element in the field of medicine. The physician has to determine what is wrong with the patient and recommend treatment, while the patient has to decide whether or not to seek medical care, and go along with the treatment recommended by the physician. Health policy makers and health insurers have to decide what to promote, what to discourage, and what to pay for. Together, these decisions determine the quality of health care that (...)
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  2. A. Baumann, G. Audibert, C. G. Lafaye, L. Puybasset, P. -M. Mertes & F. Claudot (2013). Elective Non-Therapeutic Intensive Care and the Four Principles of Medical Ethics. Journal of Medical Ethics 39 (3):139-142.score: 90.0
    The chronic worldwide lack of organs for transplantation and the continuing improvement of strategies for in situ organ preservation have led to renewed interest in elective non-therapeutic ventilation of potential organ donors. Two types of situation may be eligible for elective intensive care: patients definitely evolving towards brain death and patients suitable as controlled non-heart beating organ donors after life-supporting therapies have been assessed as futile and withdrawn. Assessment of the ethical acceptability and the risks of these strategies is (...)
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  3. Gavin H. Mooney & Alistair McGuire (eds.) (1988). Medical Ethics and Economics in Health Care. Oxford University Press.score: 90.0
    Providing health care in the most cost-effective way has become a priority in recent years. This book tackles the important issue of the potential conflict between economic expediency and the welfare of individual patients. Contributors examine different attitudes to this complex problem, along with a variety of legal and historical perspectives. The book addresses particular aspects of health care, such as medical expert systems, general practice, medical education, and clinical decision-making where the direct involvement of (...)
     
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  4. Mitchell S. Cappell (2011). The Physician-Administrator as Patient Distinctive Aspects of Medical Care. Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 54 (2):232-242.score: 88.5
    Although much has been written about how physicians react to their own illness, the subject of how health-care workers react differently to sick physicians compared to ordinary patients is largely unstudied (Klitzman 2008; Mandell and Spiro 1987; Mullan 1985; Pinner and Miller 1952; Sachs 1989; Schneck 1998). As a senior physician-administrator admitted to my hospital for a major illness, I was treated as a physician-administrator and local celebrity, rather than an ordinary patient, by everybody from physicians to janitors. Positive (...)
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  5. Gary Duhon (2008). An Uncomfortable Refusal Pp. 15-15 HTML Version | PDF Version (78k) Subject Headings: Premature Infants -- Medical Care -- Moral and Ethical Aspects. Commentary. [REVIEW] Hastings Center Report 38 (5):pp. 15-16.score: 85.5
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  6. George J. Agich (1993). Autonomy and Long-Term Care. Oxford University Press.score: 81.0
    The realities and myths of long-term care and the challenges it poses for the ethics of autonomy are analyzed in this perceptive work. The book defends the concept of autonomy, but argues that the standard view of autonomy as non-interference and independence has only a limited applicability for long term care. The treatment of actual autonomy stresses the developmental and social nature of human persons and the priority of identification over autonomous choice. The work balances analysis of the (...)
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  7. Nancy Berlinger (2005). After Harm: Medical Error and the Ethics of Forgiveness. Johns Hopkins University Press.score: 79.5
    Medical error is a leading problem of health care in the United States. Each year, more patients die as a result of medical mistakes than are killed by motor vehicle accidents, breast cancer, or AIDS. While most government and regulatory efforts are directed toward reducing and preventing errors, the actions that should follow the injury or death of a patient are still hotly debated. According to Nancy Berlinger, conversations on patient safety are missing several important components: religious (...)
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  8. C. Sommer, M. Boos, E. Conradi, N. Biller-Andorno & C. Wiesemann (2011). Care and Justice Arguments in the Ethical Reasoning of Medical Students. Ramon Llull Journal of Applied Ethics 1 (2):9.score: 77.0
    Objectives: To gather empirical data on how gender and educational level influence bioethical reasoning among medical students by analyzing their use of care versus justice arguments for reconciling a bioethical dilemma. Setting: University Departments of Medical Ethics, Social and Communication Psychology in Germany. Participants: First and fifth year medical students. Design and method: Multidisciplinary, empirical, 2-segment study of ethics in action: In intrapersonal Segment 1, the students were presented with a bioethical dilemma and then administered a (...)
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  9. Lawrence Schneiderman (2011). Defining Medical Futility and Improving Medical Care. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 8 (2):123-131.score: 76.5
    It probably should not be surprising, in this time of soaring medical costs and proliferating technology, that an intense debate has arisen over the concept of medical futility. Should doctors be doing all the things they are doing? In particular, should they be attempting treatments that have little likelihood of achieving the goals of medicine? What are the goals of medicine? Can we agree when medical treatment fails to achieve such goals? What should the physician do and (...)
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  10. Brian McKenna (2012). The Clash of Medical Civilizations: Experiencing “Primary Care” in a Neoliberal Culture. [REVIEW] Journal of Medical Humanities 33 (4):255-272.score: 75.0
    An anthropologist describes how he found himself at the vortex of a “clash of medical civilizations:” neoliberalism and the international primary health care movement. His involvement in a $6 million social change initiative in medical education became a basis to unlock the hidden tensions, contradictions and movements within the “primary care” phenomenon. The essay is structured on five ethnographic stories, situated on a continuum from “natural” species-level primary care to “unnatural” neoliberal primary care. Food (...)
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  11. J. de Boer, G. van Blijderveen, G. van Dijk, H. J. Duivenvoorden & M. Williams (2012). Implementing Structured, Multiprofessional Medical Ethical Decision-Making in a Neonatal Intensive Care Unit. Journal of Medical Ethics 38 (10):596-601.score: 75.0
    Background In neonatal intensive care, a child's death is often preceded by a medical decision. Nurses, social workers and pastors, however, are often excluded from ethical case deliberation. If multiprofessional ethical case deliberations do take place, participants may not always know how to perform to the fullest. Setting A level-IIID neonatal intensive care unit of a paediatric teaching hospital in the Netherlands. Methods Structured multiprofessional medical ethical decision-making (MEDM) was implemented to help overcome problems experienced. Important (...)
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  12. James A. Marcum (2011). Care and Competence in Medical Practice: Francis Peabody Confronts Jason Posner. [REVIEW] Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 14 (2):143-153.score: 75.0
    In this paper, I discuss the role of care and competence, as well as their relationship to one another, in contemporary medical practice. I distinguish between two types of care. The first type, care1, represents a natural concern that motivates physicians to help or to act on the behalf of patients, i.e. to care about them. However, this care cannot guarantee the correct technical or right ethical action of physicians to meet the bodily and existential (...)
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  13. Mats Hansson (2012). Where Should We Draw the Line Between Quality of Care and Other Ethical Concerns Related to Medical Registries and Biobanks? Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 33 (4):313-323.score: 72.0
    Together with large biobanks of human samples, medical registries with aggregated data from many clinical centers are vital parts of an infrastructure for maintaining high standards of quality with regard to medical diagnosis and treatment. The rapid development in personalized medicine and pharmaco-genomics only underscores the future need for these infrastructures. However, registries and biobanks have been criticized as constituting great risks to individual privacy. In this article, I suggest that quality with regard to diagnosis and treatment is (...)
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  14. J. K. Trivedi, H. Sareen & M. Dhyani (2009). Psychological Aspects of Widowhood and Divorce. Mens Sana Monographs 7 (1):37.score: 70.5
    _Despite advances in standard of living of the population, the condition of widows and divorced women remains deplorable in society. The situation is worse in developing nations with their unique social, cultural and economic milieu, which at times ignores the basic human rights of this vulnerable section of society. A gap exists in life expectancies of men and women in both developing and developed nations. This, coupled with greater remarriage rates in men, ensures that the number of widows continues to (...)
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  15. Robert F. Weir (1989). Abating Treatment with Critically Ill Patients: Ethical and Legal Limits to the Medical Prolongation of Life. Oxford University Press.score: 69.0
    This book offers an in-depth analysis of the wide range of issues surrounding "passive euthanasia" and "allow-to-die" decisions. The author develops a comprehensive conceptual model that is highly useful for assessing and dealing with real-life situations. He presents an informative historical overview, an evaluation of the clinical settings in which treatment abatement takes place, and an insightful discussion of relevant legal aspects. The result is a clearly articulated ethical analysis that is medically realistic, philosophically sound, and legally viable.
     
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  16. Kenneth W. Goodman (ed.) (2010). The Case of Terri Schiavo: Ethics, Politics, and Death in the 21st Century. Oxford University Press.score: 67.5
    The case of Terri Schiavo, a young woman who spent 15 years in a persistent vegetative state, has emerged as a watershed in debates over end-of-life care. While many observers had thought the right to refuse medical treatment was well established, this case split a family, divided a nation, and counfounded physicians, legislators, and many of the people they treated or represented. In renewing debates over the importance of advance directives, the appropriate role of artificial hydration and nutrition, (...)
     
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  17. Michel Wensing, Björn Broge, Petra Kaufmann‐Kolle, Edith Andres & Joachim Szecsenyi (2004). Quality Circles to Improve Prescribing Patterns in Primary Medical Care: What is Their Actual Impact? Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 10 (3):457-466.score: 67.5
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  18. Fiona Randall (2006). The Philosophy of Palliative Care: Critique and Reconstruction. Oxford University Press.score: 66.0
    It is a philosophy of patient care, and is therefore open to critique and evaluation.Using the Oxford Textbook of Palliative Medicine Third Edition as their ...
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  19. Rita Charon & Martha Montello (eds.) (2002). Stories Matter: The Role of Narrative in Medical Ethics. Routledge.score: 66.0
    The doctor patient relationship starts with a story. Doctors' notes, a patient's chart, the recommendations of ethics committees and insurance justifications all hinge on written and verbal narrative interaction. The "practice" of narrative profoundly affects decision making, patient health and treatment and the everyday practice of medicine. In this edited collection, the contributors provide conceptual foundations, practical guidelines and theoretical considerations central to the practice of narrative ethics.
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  20. V. A. Aita, W. M. Lydiatt & M. A. Gilbert (2010). Portraits of Care: Medical Research Through Portraiture. Medical Humanities 36 (1):5-13.score: 66.0
    The Portraits of Care study used portraiture to investigate ideas about care and care giving at the intersection of art and medicine. The study employed mixed methods involving both qualitative and quantitative research techniques. All aspects of the study were approved by the Institutional Review Board. The study included 26 patient and 20 caregiver subjects. Patient subjects were drawn from across the lifespan and included healthy and ill patients. Caregiver subjects included professional and familial caregivers. All (...)
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  21. E. J. Jeffrey, J. Goddard & D. Jeffrey (2012). Performance and Palliative Care: A Drama Module for Medical Students. Medical Humanities 38 (2):110-114.score: 66.0
    This paper describes an innovative 2 weeks module for medical students facilitated by drama educators and a palliative medicine doctor. The module incorporates drama, end-of-life care, teamwork and reflective practice. The module contents, practical aspects of drama teaching and learning outcomes are discussed. Various themes emerged from a study of Harold Pinter's play, The Caretaker, which were relevant to clinical practice: silence, power, communication, uncertainty and unanswered questions. Drama teaching may be one way of enhancing students’ confidence, (...)
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  22. Fiona Randall (1996). Palliative Care Ethics: A Good Companion. Oxford University Press.score: 66.0
    Palliative care is a recent branch of health care. The doctors, nurses, and other professionals involved in it took their inspiration from the medieval idea of the hospice, but have now extended their expertise to every area of health care: surgeries, nursing homes, acute wards, and the community. This has happened during a period when patients wish to take more control over their own lives and deaths, resources have become scarce, and technology has created controversial life-prolonging treatments. (...)
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  23. Daniel S. Brenner (ed.) (2002). Embracing Life & Facing Death: A Jewish Guide to Palliative Care. Clal.score: 66.0
     
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  24. Samuel Gorovitz (1991/1993). Drawing the Line: Life, Death, and Ethical Choices in an American Hospital. Temple University Press.score: 66.0
    In 1985, philosopher Samuel Gorovitz spent seven weeks at Boston's Beth Israel, one of the nation's premier teaching hospitals, where he was given free run as "Authorized Snoop and Irritant-at-Large." In Drawing the Line, he provides an intense, disturbing, and insightful account of his observations during those seven weeks. Gorovitz guides us through an operating room and intensive care units, and takes us to meetings where surgeons discuss the mishaps of the preceding week, where internists map out their approaches (...)
     
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  25. Margaret Monahan Hogan & David Solomon (eds.) (2007/2008). Medical Ethics at Notre Dame: The J. Philip Clarke Family Lectures, 1988-1999. [South Bend, Ind.?]The Notre Dame Center for Ethics and Culture.score: 66.0
     
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  26. Margaret Monahan Hogan & David Solomon (eds.) (2007/2008). Medical Ethics at Notre Dame: The J. [South Bend, Ind.?]The Notre Dame Center for Ethics and Culture.score: 66.0
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  27. Thomas J. Papadimos (2004). Stoicism, the Physician, and Care of Medical Outliers. BMC Medical Ethics 5 (1):1-7.score: 66.0
    BackgroundMedical outliers present a medical, psychological, social, and economic challenge to the physicians who care for them. The determinism of Stoic thought is explored as an intellectual basis for the pursuit of a correct mental attitude that will provide aid and comfort to physicians who care for medical outliers, thus fostering continued physician engagement in their care.DiscussionThe Stoic topics of good, the preferable, the morally indifferent, living consistently, and appropriate actions are reviewed. Furthermore, Zeno's (...)
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  28. Robert Baker (ed.) (1999). The American Medical Ethics Revolution: How the Ama's Code of Ethics has Transformed Physicians' Relationships to Patients, Professionals, and Society. Johns Hopkins University Press.score: 63.0
    The American Medical Association enacted its Code of Ethics in 1847, the first such national codification. In this volume, a distinguished group of experts from the fields of medicine, bioethics, and history of medicine reflect on the development of medical ethics in the United States, using historical analyses as a springboard for discussions of the problems of the present, including what the editors call "a sense of moral crisis precipitated by the shift from a system of fee-for-service medicine (...)
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  29. Susan B. Rubin (1998). When Doctors Say No: The Battleground of Medical Futility. Indiana University Press.score: 63.0
    Who should decide? In When Doctors Say No, philosopher and bioethicist Rubin examines this controversial issue.
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  30. Jessica Price & Agnes Binagwaho (2010). From Medical Rationing to Rationalizing the Use of Human Resources for Aids Care and Treatment in Africa: A Case for Task Shifting. Developing World Bioethics 10 (2):99-103.score: 63.0
    With a global commitment to scaling up AIDS care and treatment in resource-poor settings for some of the most HIV-affected countries in Africa, availability of antiretroviral treatment is no longer the principal obstacle to expanding access to treatment. A shortage of trained healthcare personnel to initiate treatment and manage patients represents a more challenging barrier to offering life-saving treatment to all patients in need. Physician-centered treatment policies accentuate this challenge. Despite evidence that task shifting for nurse-centered AIDS patient (...) is effective and can alleviate severe physician shortages that currently obstruct treatment scale-up, political commitment and policy action to support task shifting models of care has been slow to absent. In this paper we review the evidence in support of task shifting for AIDS treatment in Africa and argue that continued policy inaction amounts to unwarranted healthcare rationing and as such is ethically untenable. (shrink)
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  31. Mansoor Elahi (2011). Medical Ethics: A Practical Guide to Patient Care, Related Ethics, Conventions and Laws. Mtro Medical Publishing.score: 63.0
     
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  32. Joan McCarthy (ed.) (2011). End-of-Life Care: Ethics and Law. Cork University Press.score: 63.0
     
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  33. Gary E. McCuen (1985/1988). Terminating Life: Conflicting Values in Health Care. Gary E. Mccuen Publications.score: 63.0
     
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  34. Reinhard Priester (ed.) (1989). Rethinking Medical Morality: The Ethical Implications of Changes in Health Care Organization, Delivery, and Financing. Center for Biomedical Ethics, University of Minnesota.score: 63.0
     
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  35. Jane Stein (1978). Making Medical Choices: Who is Responsible? Houghton Mifflin.score: 63.0
     
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  36. Catherine Phillips (2012). Mutual Humanization: A Visual Exploration of Relationships in Medical Care. [REVIEW] Journal of Medical Humanities 33 (2):109-116.score: 61.5
    In this article, I explore the work of the artist Robert Pope (b.1957- d.1992) who published a series of paintings and drawings which documented his decade-long experience with Hodgkin's lymphoma. More widely, Pope was interested in ‘the culture’ of cancer within hospitals and the relationships embedded in experiences of illness and care. Pope published a book that contains much of this work— Illness and Healing: Images of Cancer (1991). Many of the original artworks have been toured throughout Canada and (...)
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  37. I. Plu, I. Purssell-Francois, G. Moutel, F. Ellien & C. Herve (2008). Ethical Issues Arising From the Requirement to Sign a Consent Form in Palliative Care. Journal of Medical Ethics 34 (4):279-280.score: 61.5
    French healthcare networks aim to help healthcare workers to take care of patients by improving cooperation, coordination and the continuity of care. When applied to palliative care in the home, they facilitate overall care including medical, social and psychological aspects. French legislation in 2002 required that an information document explaining the functioning of the network should be given to patients when they enter a healthcare network. The law requires that this document be signed. (...)
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  38. Ruth Macklin (1999). Against Relativism: Cultural Diversity and the Search for Ethical Universals in Medicine. Oxford University Press.score: 60.0
    This book provides an analysis of the debate surrounding cultural diversity, and attempts to reconcile the seemingly opposing views of "ethical imperialism," the belief that each individual is entitled to fundamental human rights, and cultural relativism, the belief that ethics must be relative to particular cultures and societies. The author examines the role of cultural tradition, often used as a defense against critical ethical judgments. Key issues in health and medicine are explored in the context of cultural diversity: the physician-patient (...)
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  39. Julie Jomeen & Colin R. Martin (2008). The Impact of Choice of Maternity Care on Psychological Health Outcomes for Women During Pregnancy and the Postnatal Period. Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 14 (3):391-398.score: 60.0
  40. Tamara Kohn & Rosemary McKechnie (eds.) (1999). Extending the Boundaries of Care: Medical Ethics and Caring Practices. Berg.score: 60.0
    How is the concept of patient care adapting in response to rapid changes in healthcare delivery and advances in medical technology? How are questions of ethical responsibility and social diversity shaping the definitions of healthcare? In this topical study, scholars in anthropology, nursing theory, law and ethics explore questions involving the changing relationship between patient care and medical ethics. Contributors address issues that challenge the boundaries of patient care, such as: · HIV-related care and (...)
     
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  41. Silvia Martínez‐Valverde, Angélica Castro‐Ríos, Ricardo Pérez‐Cuevas, Miguel Klunder‐Klunder, Guillermo Salinas‐Escudero & Hortensia Reyes‐Morales (2012). Effectiveness of a Medical Education Intervention to Treat Hypertension in Primary Care. Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 18 (2):420-425.score: 60.0
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  42. M. W. Ross (1989). Psychosocial Ethical Aspects of AIDS. Journal of Medical Ethics 15 (2):74-81.score: 60.0
    The psychosocial morbidity associated with HIV infection and responses to such infection may exceed morbidity associated with medical sequelae of such infection. This paper argues that negative judgements on those with HIV infection or in groups associated with such infection will cause avoidable psychological and social distress. Moral judgements made regarding HIV infection may also harm the common good by promoting conditions which may increase the spread of HIV infection. This paper examines these two lines of argument with (...)
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  43. Sandra Tanenbaum (2012). Improving the Quality of Medical Care: The Normativity of Evidence-Based Performance Standards. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 33 (4):263-277.score: 60.0
    Poor quality medical care is sometimes attributed to physicians’ unwillingness to act on evidence about what works best. Evidence-based performance standards (EBPSs) are one response to this problem, and they are increasingly employed by health care regulators and payers. Evidence in this instance is judged according to the precepts of evidence-based medicine (EBM); it is probabilistic, and the randomized controlled trial (RCT) is the gold standard. This means that EBPSs suffer all the infirmities of EBM generally—well rehearsed (...)
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  44. Carlos K. H. Wong, Cindy L. K. Lam, Jensen T. C. Poon, Sarah M. McGhee, Wai‐Lun Law, Dora L. W. Kwong, Janice Tsang & Pierre Chan (2012). Direct Medical Costs of Care for Chinese Patients with Colorectal Neoplasia: A Health Care Service Provider Perspective. Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 18 (6):1203-1210.score: 60.0
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  45. Olivia Wu, Robin Knill‐Jones, Philip Wilson & Neil Craig (2004). The Impact of Economic Information on Medical Decision Making in Primary Care. Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 10 (3):407-411.score: 60.0
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  46. Samuel Gorovitz (1982/1985). Doctors' Dilemmas: Moral Conflict and Medical Care. Oxford University Press.score: 58.5
    Doctor's Dilemmas, a fascinating study of the moral dilemmas confronting health professionals and patients alike, examines areas of health care where ethical conflicts often arise. Gorovitz illuminates these conflicts by clearly explaining and applying a broad range of philosophical concepts. He lays the groundwork for informed ethical decision-making and provides the general reader with a lucid overview of the complexities of medical practice. Written in accessible, conversational style and making extensive use of anecdotes, examples, and references to literature, (...)
     
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  47. Donald Robertson (2010). The Philosophy of Cognitive-Behavioural Therapy (Cbt): Stoic Philosophy as Rational and Cognitive Psychotherapy. Karnac.score: 58.0
    Pt. I. Philosophy and cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) -- Ch. 1. The "philosophical origins" of CBT -- Ch. 2. The beginning of modern cognitive therapy -- Ch. 3. A brief history of philosophical therapy -- Ch. 4. Stoic philosophy and psychology -- Ch. 5. Rational emotion in stoicism and CBT -- Ch. 6 Stoicism and Ellis's rational therapy (REBT) -- Pt. II. The stoic armamentarium -- Ch. 7. Contemplation of the ideal stage -- Ch. 8. Stoic mindfulness of the "here and (...)
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  48. Elisabeth Conradi, Nikola Biller-Andorno, Margarete Boos, Christina Sommer & Claudia Wiesemann (2003). Gender in Medical Ethics: Re-Examining the Conceptual Basis of Empirical Research. Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 6 (1):51-58.score: 58.0
    Conducting empirical research on gender in medical ethics is a challenge from a theoretical as well as a practical point of view. It still has to be clarified how gender aspects can be integrated without sustaining gender stereotypes. The developmental psychologist Carol Gilligan was among the first to question ethics from a gendered point of view. The notion of care introduced by her challenged conventional developmental psychology as well as moral philosophy. Gilligan was criticised, however, because her (...)
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  49. Suzanne Shale (2012). Moral Leadership in Medicine: Building Ethical Healthcare Organizations. Cambridge University Press.score: 57.0
    Machine generated contents note: Preface; Acknowledgements; 1. Why medicine needs moral leaders; 2. Creating an organizational narrative; 3. Understanding normative expectations in medical moral leadership; Prologue to chapters four and five; 4. Expressing fiduciary, bureaucratic and collegial propriety; 5. Expressing inquisitorial and restorative propriety; Epilogue to chapters four and five; 6. Understanding organizational moral narrative; 7. Moral leadership for ethical organizations; Appendix 1. How the research was done; Appendix 2. Accountability for clinical performance: individuals and organisations; Appendix 3. A (...)
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  50. J. Bos (2009). The Rise and Decline of Character: Humoral Psychology in Ancient and Early Modern Medical Theory. History of the Human Sciences 22 (3):29-50.score: 57.0
    Humoralism, the view that the human body is composed of a limited number of elementary fluids, is one of the most characteristic aspects of ancient medicine. The psychological dimension of humoral theory in the ancient world has thus far received a relatively small amount of scholarly attention. Medical psychology in the ancient world can only be correctly understood by relating it to psychological thought in other fields, such as ethics and rhetoric. The concept that ties these (...)
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