Search results for 'Medical ethics Congresses' (try it on Scholar)

1000+ found
Order:
  1. Gavin H. Mooney & Alistair McGuire (eds.) (1988). Medical Ethics and Economics in Health Care. Oxford University Press.
    Providing health care in the most cost-effective way has become a priority in recent years. This book tackles the important issue of the potential conflict between economic expediency and the welfare of individual patients. Contributors examine different attitudes to this complex problem, along with a variety of legal and historical perspectives. The book addresses particular aspects of health care, such as medical expert systems, general practice, medical education, and clinical decision-making where the direct involvement of doctors in allocating (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  2. Zbigniew Bańkowski & J. Corvera Bernardelli (eds.) (1981). Medical Ethics and Medical Education: Proceedings of the Xivth Round Table Conference, Mexico City, Mexico, 1-3 December 1980. [REVIEW] Who Publications Centre [Distributor].
  3.  61
    M. Parker (1995). Autonomy, Problem-Based Learning, and the Teaching of Medical Ethics. Journal of Medical Ethics 21 (5):305-310.
    Autonomy has been the central principle underpinning changes which have affected the practice of medicine in recent years. Medical education is undergoing changes as well, many of which are underpinned, at least implicitly, by increasing concern for autonomy. Some universities have embarked on graduate courses which utilize problem-based learning (PBL) techniques to teach all areas, including medical ethics. I argue that PBL is a desirable method for teaching and learning in medical ethics. It is desirable (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  4.  19
    A. Baumann, G. Audibert, C. G. Lafaye, L. Puybasset, P. -M. Mertes & F. Claudot (2013). Elective Non-Therapeutic Intensive Care and the Four Principles of Medical Ethics. Journal of Medical Ethics 39 (3):139-142.
    The chronic worldwide lack of organs for transplantation and the continuing improvement of strategies for in situ organ preservation have led to renewed interest in elective non-therapeutic ventilation of potential organ donors. Two types of situation may be eligible for elective intensive care: patients definitely evolving towards brain death and patients suitable as controlled non-heart beating organ donors after life-supporting therapies have been assessed as futile and withdrawn. Assessment of the ethical acceptability and the risks of these strategies is essential. (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  5.  64
    P. Riis (1993). Medical Ethics in the European Community. Journal of Medical Ethics 19 (1):7-12.
    Increasing European co-operation must take place in many areas, including medical ethics. Against the background of common cultural norms and pluralistic variation within political traditions, religion and lifestyles, Europe will have to converge towards unity within the field of medical ethics. This article examines how such convergence might develop with respect to four major areas: European research ethics committees, democratic health systems, the human genome project and rules for stopping futile treatments.
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  6.  17
    M. H. Kottow (1999). In Defence of Medical Ethics. Journal of Medical Ethics 25 (4):340-343.
    A number of recent publications by the philosopher David Seedhouse are discussed. Although medicine is an eminently ethical enterprise, the technical and ethical aspects of health care practices can be distinguished, therefore justifying the existence of medical ethics and its teaching as a specific part of every medical curriculum. The goal of teaching medical ethics is to make health care practitioners aware of the essential ethical aspects of their work. Furthermore, the contention that rational bioethics (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  7. Allison Merrick, Rochelle Green, Thomas V. Cunningham, Leah R. Eisenberg & D. Micah Hester (2016). Introducing the Medical Ethics Bowl. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 25 (1):141-149.
    Although ethics is an essential component of undergraduate medical education, research suggests current medical ethics curricula face considerable challenges in improving students’ ethical reasoning. This paper discusses these challenges and introduces a promising new mode of graduate and professional ethics instruction for overcoming them. We begin by describing common ethics curricula, focusing in particular on established problems with current approaches. Next, we describe a novel method of ethics education and assessment for medical (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  8. J. K. Mason (2003). Law and Medical Ethics. Lexisnexis Uk.
    This new edition of Law and Medical Ethics continues to chart the ever-widening field that the topics cover. The interplay between the health caring professions and the public during the period intervening since the last edition has, perhaps, been mainly dominated by wide-ranging changes in the administration of the National Health Service and of the professions themselves but these have been paralleled by important developments in medical jurisprudence.
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   18 citations  
  9.  9
    Emanuela Turillazzi & Margherita Neri (2014). Medical Error Disclosure: From the Therapeutic Alliance to Risk Management: The Vision of the New Italian Code of Medical Ethics. BMC Medical Ethics 15 (1):57.
    The Italian code of medical deontology recently approved stipulates that physicians have the duty to inform the patient of each unwanted event and its causes, and to identify, report and evaluate adverse events and errors. Thus the obligation to supply information continues to widen, in some way extending beyond the doctor-patient relationship to become an essential tool for improving the quality of professional services.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  10.  13
    Laurence R. Tancredi (ed.) (1974). Ethics of Health Care: Papers of the Conference on Health Care and Changing Values, November 27-29, 1973. National Academy of Sciences.
    I Conceptual Foundations Ethical problems emerging from modern medical technology have been evaluated on an issue-by-issue basis. ...
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  11.  21
    Allison Merrick, Rochelle Green, Thomas V. Cunningham, Leah R. Eisenberg & D. Micah Hester (2016). Introducing the Medical Ethics Bowl. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 25 (1):141-149.
    Although ethics is an essential component of undergraduate medical education, research suggests current medical ethics curricula face considerable challenges in improving students’ ethical reasoning. This paper discusses these challenges and introduces a promising new mode of graduate and professional ethics instruction for overcoming them. We begin by describing common ethics curricula, focusing in particular on established problems with current approaches. Next, we describe a novel method of ethics education and assessment for medical (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  12.  2
    Troyen A. Brennan (1993). [Book Review] Just Doctoring, Medical Ethics in the Liberal State. [REVIEW] Ethics 103 (4):832-834.
    _Just Doctoring_ draws the doctor-patient relationship out of the consulting room and into the middle of the legal and political arenas where it more and more frequently appears. Traditionally, medical ethics has focused on the isolated relationship of physician to patient in a setting that has left the physician virtually untouched by market constraints or government regulation. Arguing that changes in health care institutions and legal attention to patient rights have made conventional approaches obsolete, Troyen Brennan points the (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   7 citations  
  13.  39
    Clement A. Adebamowo (2010). Medical Ethics Education: A Survey of Opinion of Medical Students in a Nigerian University. [REVIEW] Journal of Academic Ethics 8 (2):85-93.
    In Nigeria, medical education remains focused on the traditional clinical and basic medical science components, leaving students to develop moral attitudes passively through observation and intuition. In order to ascertain the adequacy of this method of moral formations, we studied the opinions of medical students in a Nigerian university towards medical ethics training. Self administered semi-structured questionnaires were completed by final year medical students of the College of Medicine, University of Ibadan, Nigeria. There were (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  14.  38
    Albert R. Jonsen (2000). A Short History of Medical Ethics. Oxford University Press.
    A physician says, "I have an ethical obligation never to cause the death of a patient," another responds, "My ethical obligation is to relieve pain even if the patient dies." The current argument over the role of physicians in assisting patients to die constantly refers to the ethical duties of the profession. References to the Hippocratic Oath are often heard. Many modern problems, from assisted suicide to accessible health care, raise questions about the traditional ethics of medicine and the (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   12 citations  
  15.  11
    Goran Mijaljica (2014). Medical Ethics, Bioethics and Research Ethics Education Perspectives in South East Europe in Graduate Medical Education. Science and Engineering Ethics 20 (1):237-247.
    Ethics has an established place within the medical curriculum. However notable differences exist in the programme characteristics of different schools of medicine. This paper addresses the main differences in the curricula of medical schools in South East Europe regarding education in medical ethics and bioethics, with a special emphasis on research ethics, and proposes a model curriculum which incorporates significant topics in all three fields. Teaching curricula of Medical Schools in Bulgaria, Bosnia and (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  16.  21
    Yitzhak Brand (2010). Essays: Religious Medical Ethics: A Study of the Rulings of Rabbi Waldenberg. Journal of Religious Ethics 38 (3):495-520.
    This article seeks to examine how religious ideas that are not the focus of a particular halakhic question become the crux of the ruling, thereby molding it and dictating its bias. We will attempt to demonstrate this through a study of Jewish medical ethics, based on some of the rulings of one of the greatest halakhic decisors of the previous generation: Rabbi Eliezer Yehuda Waldenberg (1915–2006). Rabbi Waldenberg molds his rulings on the basis of a religious principle asserting (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  17.  5
    Alan Jotkowitz (2014). The Seminal Contribution of Rabbi Moshe Feinstein to the Development of Modern Jewish Medical Ethics. Journal of Religious Ethics 42 (2):285-309.
    The purpose of this essay is to show how, on a wide variety of issues, Rabbi Moshe Feinstein broke new ground with the established Orthodox rabbinic consensus and blazed a new trail in Jewish medical ethics. Rabbi Feinstein took power away from the rabbis and let patients decide their treatment, he opened the door for a Jewish approach to palliative care, he supported the use of new technologies to aid in reproduction, he endorsed altruistic living organ donation and (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  18.  13
    Donna Dickenson, Richard Huxtable & Michael Parker (eds.) (2010). The Cambridge Medical Ethics Workbook. Cambridge University Press.
    This new edition of The Cambridge Medical Ethics Workbook builds on the success of the first edition by working from the 'bottom up', with a widely praised case ...
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   4 citations  
  19.  43
    Robert Baker (ed.) (1999). The American Medical Ethics Revolution: How the Ama's Code of Ethics has Transformed Physicians' Relationships to Patients, Professionals, and Society. Johns Hopkins University Press.
    The American Medical Association enacted its Code of Ethics in 1847, the first such national codification. In this volume, a distinguished group of experts from the fields of medicine, bioethics, and history of medicine reflect on the development of medical ethics in the United States, using historical analyses as a springboard for discussions of the problems of the present, including what the editors call "a sense of moral crisis precipitated by the shift from a system of (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   10 citations  
  20.  26
    Jonathan E. Brockopp & Thomas Eich (eds.) (2008). Muslim Medical Ethics: From Theory to Practice. University of South Carolina Press.
    Muslim Medical Ethics draws on the work of historians, health-care professionals, theologians, and social scientists to produce an interdisciplinary view of ...
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   4 citations  
  21. Gregory E. Pence (2004). Classic Cases in Medical Ethics: Accounts of Cases That Have Shaped Medical Ethics, with Philosophical, Legal, and Historical Bacgrounds. Mcgraw-Hill.
    This rich collection, popular among teachers and students alike, provides an in-depth look at major cases that have shaped the field of medical ethics. The book presents each famous (or infamous) case using extensive historical and contextual background, and then proceeds to illuminate it by careful discussion of pertinent philosophical theories and legal and ethical issues.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   6 citations  
  22.  18
    Ezekiel J. Emanuel (1991). The Ends of Human Life: Medical Ethics in a Liberal Polity. Harvard University Press.
    INTRODUCTION The Questions of Medical Ethics Call him Andrew. His face is gaunt and unshaven but peaceful. His eyelids are gently closed. ...
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   12 citations  
  23. Zbigniew Bańkowski & Norman Howard-Jones (eds.) (1982). Human Experimentation and Medical Ethics: Proceedings of the Xvth Cioms Round Table Conference, Manila, 13-16 September 1981. [REVIEW] Who Publications Centre Usa [Distributor].
  24. José Miola (2007). Medical Ethics and Medical Law: A Symbiotic Relationship. Hart.
    Introduction -- Historical perspectives of medical ethics -- The medical ethics Renaissance: a brief assessment -- Risk disclosure/'informed consent' -- Consent, control and minors: Gillick and beyond -- Sterilisation/best interests: legislation intervenes -- The end of life: total abrogation -- Medical ethics in government-commissioned reports -- Conclusion.
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   4 citations  
  25. Ronald E. Cranford & A. Edward Doudera (eds.) (1984). Institutional Ethics Committees and Health Care Decision Making. Health Administration Press.
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   9 citations  
  26.  42
    Aasim I. Padela (2007). Islamic Medical Ethics: A Primer. Bioethics 21 (3):169–178.
    ABSTRACTModern medical practice is becoming increasingly pluralistic and diverse. Hence, cultural competency and awareness are given more focus in physician training seminars and within medical school curricula. A renewed interest in describing the varied ethical constructs of specific populations has taken place within medical literature. This paper aims to provide an overview of Islamic Medical Ethics. Beginning with a definition of Islamic Medical Ethics, the reader will be introduced to the scope of Islamic (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   5 citations  
  27. Robert Baker & Laurence B. McCullough (eds.) (2008). The Cambridge World History of Medical Ethics. Cambridge University Press.
    The Cambridge World History of Medical Ethics is the first comprehensive scholarly account of the global history of medical ethics. Offering original interpretations of the field by leading bioethicists and historians of medicine, it will serve as the essential point of departure for future scholarship in the field. The volumes reconceptualize the history of medical ethics through the creation of new categories, including the life cycle; discourses of religion, philosophy, and bioethics; and the relationship (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  28.  16
    Bagher Larijani & Farzaneh Zahedi (2008). Contemporary Medical Ethics: An Overview From Iran. Developing World Bioethics 8 (3):192-196.
    We have discussed some of the activities in the field of medical ethics that have been carried out in our country within recent years.
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   4 citations  
  29. Robert M. Veatch (2005). Disrupted Dialogue: Medical Ethics and the Collapse of Physician-Humanist Communication (1770-1980). Oxford University Press.
    Medical ethics changed dramatically in the past 30 years because physicians and humanists actively engaged each other in discussions that sometimes led to confrontation and controversy, but usually have improved the quality of medical decision-making. Before then medical ethics had been isolated for almost two centuries from the larger philosophical, social, and religious controversies of the time. There was, however, an earlier period where leaders in medicine and in the humanities worked closely together and both (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  30. Alastair V. Campbell (ed.) (1997). Medical Ethics. Oxford University Press.
    This book is intended as a practical introduction to the ethical problems which doctors and other health professionals can expect to encounter in their practice. It is divided into three parts: ethical foundations, clinical ethics, and medicine and society. The authors incorporate new chapters on topics such as theories of medical ethics, cultural aspects of medicine, genetic dilemmas, aging, dementia and mortality, research ethics, justice and health care (including an examination of resource allocation), and medicine, (...) and medical law. Medical Ethics also covers issues having to do with the beginning and end of life, as well as ethical questions surrounding the human body and the use of human tissue, confidentiality and AIDS, care of the mentally ill, and the implications of genetic technology. Each chapter presents a range of ethical views, drawing both from traditional philosophy and the most recent contemporary trends. The theoretical discussion is extended and illustrated by case studies and examples. This book is a non-technical guide to ethics written with the needs of medical students and medical practitioners in mind. It will also appeal to students and practitioners of allied health professions, and for all users of health care services. (shrink)
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   5 citations  
  31.  22
    Kristján Kristjánsson (2015). Phronesis as an Ideal in Professional Medical Ethics: Some Preliminary Positionings and Problematics. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 36 (5):299-320.
    Phronesis has become a buzzword in contemporary medical ethics. Yet, the use of this single term conceals a number of significant conceptual controversies based on divergent philosophical assumptions. This paper explores three of them: on phronesis as universalist or relativist, generalist or particularist, and natural/painless or painful/ambivalent. It also reveals tensions between Alasdair MacIntyre’s take on phronesis, typically drawn upon in professional ethics discourses, and Aristotle’s original concept. The paper offers these four binaries as a possible analytical (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  32.  16
    Andreas Frewer (2010). Human Rights From the Nuremberg Doctors Trial to the Geneva Declaration. Persons and Institutions in Medical Ethics and History. Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 13 (3):259-268.
    The “Universal Declaration of Human Rights” and the “Geneva Declaration” by the World Medical Association, both in 1948, were preceded by the foundation of the United Nations in New York (1945), the World Medical Association in London (1946) and the World Health Organization in Geneva (1948). After the end of World War II the community of nations strove to achieve and sustain their primary goals of peace and security, as well as their basic premise, namely the health of (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  33.  20
    Thomas Stephen Szasz (1977). The Theology of Medicine: The Political-Philosophical Foundations of Medical Ethics. Syracuse University Press.
    The essays assembled in this volume reflect my long-standing interest in moral philosophy and my conviction that the idea of a medical ethics as something ...
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   6 citations  
  34. Andreas-Holger Maehle (2009). Doctors, Honour, and the Law: Medical Ethics in Imperial Germany. Palgrave Macmillan.
    Disciplining doctors : medical courts of honour and professional conduct -- Medical confidentiality : the debate on private versus public interests -- Patient information and consent : self-determination versus paternalism -- Duties and habitus of a doctor : the literature on medical ethics.
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  35. Zbigniew Bańkowski, J. Barzelatto & Alexander Morgan Capron (eds.) (1989). Ethics and Human Values in Family Planning: Conference Highlights, Papers, and Discussion: Xxii Cioms Conference, Bangkok, Thailand, 19-24 June 1988. [REVIEW] Cioms.
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  36. James Bopp (ed.) (1985). Human Life and Health Care Ethics. University Publications of America.
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  37. C. L. Buchanan & E. W. Prior (eds.) (1985). Medical Care and Markets: Conflicts Between Efficiency and Justice. Centre of Policy Studies, Monash University.
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  38. Daniel Callahan & G. R. Dunstan (eds.) (1988). Biomedical Ethics: An Anglo-American Dialogue. New York Academy of Sciences.
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  39. Bernard G. Clarke & Mary Stainsby (eds.) (1991). Ethics and Resource Allocation in Health Care: Proceeding of 1991 Annual Conference on Bioethics. St Vincent's Bioethics Centre.
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  40. F. J. G. Ebling (ed.) (1969). Biology and Ethics. New York, Published for the Institute of Biology by Academic Press.
  41. Norman Howard-Jones & Zbigniew Bańkowski (eds.) (1979). Medical Experimentation and the Protection of Human Rights: Proceedings of the Xiith Cioms Round Table Conference, Cascais, Portugal, 30 November-1 December, 1978. [REVIEW] Who Publications Centre [Distributor].
  42. Felix Adrian Kantrowitz (ed.) (1968). Who Shall Live and Who Shall Die?: The Ethical Implications of the New Medical Technology. Union of American Hebrew Congregations.
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  43. Peter Steinfels & Carol Levine (eds.) (1976). Biomedical Ethics and the Shadow of Nazism: A Conference on the Proper Use of the Nazi Analogy in Ethical Debate, April 8, 1976. The Center.
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  44. C. J. Vas & E. J. De Souza (eds.) (1990). Issues in Biomedical Ethics: Proceedings of the Festival of Life International Congress. Macmillan India.
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  45.  85
    Judith Andre (1999). The Alleged Incompatibility of Business and Medical Ethics. HEC Forum 11 (4):288-292.
    Business Ethics and medical ethics are in principle compatible: In particular, the tools of business ethics can be useful to those doing healthcare ethics. Health care could be conducted as a business and maintain its moral core.
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  46. Nafsika Athanassoulis (ed.) (2005). Philosophical Reflections on Medical Ethics. Palgrave Macmillan.
    This collection brings together original essays demonstrating the cutting edge of philosophical research in medical ethics. With contributions from a range of established and up-and-coming authors, it examines topics at the forefront of medical technology, such as ethical issues raised by developments in how we research stem cells and genetic engineering, as well as new questions raised by methodological changes in how we approach medical ethics.
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  47.  10
    Giovanni Maio (1999). Is Etiquette Relevant to Medical Ethics? Ethics and Aesthetics in the Works of John Gregory (1724–1773). Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 2 (2):181-187.
    The writings of the Scottish physician and philosopher John Gregory play an important role in the modern codification of medical ethics. It is therefore appropriate to use his work as a historical example in approaching the question how elements of aesthetics were incorporated in 18th century medical ethics. The concept of a Gentleman is pivotal to the entire medical ethics of John Gregory as it provides him with the ethical source of the duty to (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  48.  12
    N. Zurak, D. Derezic & G. Pavlekovic (1999). Students' Opinions on the Medical Ethics Course in the Medical School Curriculum. Journal of Medical Ethics 25 (1):61-62.
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  49.  21
    Robert M. Veatch (1977). Case Studies in Medical Ethics. Harvard University Press.
    INTRODUCTION Five Questions of Ethics Medical ethics as a field presents a fundamental problem. As a branch of applied ethics, medical ethics becomes ...
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  50.  27
    D. W. Musick (1999). Teaching Medical Ethics: A Review of the Literature From North American Medical Schools with Emphasis on Education. [REVIEW] Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 2 (3):239-254.
    Efforts to reform medical education have emphasized the need to formalize instruction in medical ethics. However, the discipline of medical ethics education is still searching for an acceptable identity among North American medical schools; in these schools, no real consensus exists on its definition. Medical educators are grappling with not only what to teach (content) in this regard, but also with how to teach (process) ethics to the physicians of tomorrow. A literature (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
1 — 50 / 1000