Search results for 'Medical ethics Cross-cultural studies' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Ruth Macklin (1999). Against Relativism: Cultural Diversity and the Search for Ethical Universals in Medicine. Oxford University Press.score: 930.0
    This book provides an analysis of the debate surrounding cultural diversity, and attempts to reconcile the seemingly opposing views of "ethical imperialism," the belief that each individual is entitled to fundamental human rights, and cultural relativism, the belief that ethics must be relative to particular cultures and societies. The author examines the role of cultural tradition, often used as a defense against critical ethical judgments. Key issues in health and medicine are explored in the context of cultural diversity: the (...)
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  2. Subrata Chattopadhyay & Alfred Simon (2008). East Meets West: Cross-Cultural Perspective in End-of-Life Decision Making From Indian and German Viewpoints. [REVIEW] Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 11 (2):165-174.score: 800.2
    Culture creates the context within which individuals experience life and comprehend moral meaning of illness, suffering and death. The ways the patient, family and the physician communicate and make decisions in the end-of-life care are profoundly influenced by culture. What is considered as right or wrong in the healthcare setting may depend on the socio-cultural context. The present article is intended to delve into the cross-cultural perspectives in ethical decision making in the end-of-life scenario. We attempt to address the (...)
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  3. Jing-Bao Nie (2012). Medical Ethics in China: A Transcultural Interpretation. Routledge.score: 794.0
     
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  4. Michael J. Gift, Paul Gift & QinQin Zheng (2013). Cross-Cultural Perceptions of Business Ethics: Evidence From the United States and China. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 114 (4):633-642.score: 777.6
    A number of empirical studies have examined business ethics across cultures, focusing primarily on differences in ethical profiles between cultures and groups. When managers consider whether or not to develop a business relationship with those from a different culture, their decision may be affected by actual differences in ethical profiles, but potentially even more so by their perceptions of ethicality in the counterpart culture. The latter issue has been largely ignored in extant empirical research regarding cross-cultural ethical (...)
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  5. Alireza Bagheri (2013). Medical Futility: A Cross-National Study. Imperial College Press.score: 696.6
    So-called futile care : the experience of the Unied States -- The reality of medical futility in Brazil -- Medical futility and end-of-lfe issues in Belgium -- The concept of medical futility in Venezuela -- Medical futility in Russian Federation -- Medical futility in Australia -- Medical futility in Japan -- Ethical issues and policy in medical futility in China -- Medical futility in Korea -- Medical futility from Swiss perspective -- (...)
     
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  6. Sumner B. Twiss (2006). On Cross-Cultural Conflict and Pediatric Intervention. [REVIEW] Journal of Religious Ethics 34 (1):163 - 175.score: 676.8
    A critical examination of Richard Miller's position in his recent "Children, Ethics, and Modern Medicine" on how to handle pediatric interventions in cases of cross-cultural conflict between parents and doctors with respect to treating young children. Particular emphasis is placed on Miller's interpretation of and arguments about a Hmong case extensively researched by Anne Fadiman in her "The Spirit Catches You and You Fall Down". The conclusion drawn is that Miller's position requires further nuance and development, and some (...)
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  7. Gael McDonald (2000). Cross-Cultural Methodological Issues in Ethical Research. Journal of Business Ethics 27 (1-2):89 - 104.score: 657.6
    Despite the fundamental and administrative difficulties associated with cross-cultural research the rewards are significant and, given an increasing trend toward globalisation, the move away from singular location studies to more comparative research is to be encouraged. In order to facilitate this research process it is imperative, however, that considerable attention is given to the methodological issues that can beset cross-cultural research, specifically as these issues relate to the primary domain or discipline of investigation, which in this instance (...)
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  8. Valmae A. Ypinazar & Stephen A. Margolis (2004). Western Medical Ethics Taught to Junior Medical Students Can Cross Cultural and Linguistic Boundaries. BMC Medical Ethics 5 (1):4.score: 643.2
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  9. Zhenzhong Ma (2010). The SINS in Business Negotiations: Explore the Cross-Cultural Differences in Business Ethics Between Canada and China. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 91 (1):123 - 135.score: 602.0
    Ethical dilemmas are inescapable components of business negotiations. It is thus important for negotiators to understand the differences in what is ethically appropriate and what is not. This study explores the cross-cultural differences in business ethics between Canada and China by examining the perceived appropriateness of five categories of ethically questionable strategies often used in business negotiations. The results show that the Chinese are more likely to consider it appropriate to use ethically inappropriate negotiation strategies, but the impact (...)
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  10. Mara Miller (forthcoming). Paintings of Agriculture as the Image of Ethics: Cross-Cultural Case Studies. New Rurality.score: 597.6
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  11. Marcia Angell (2005). Cross-Cultural Considerations in Medical Ethics. In. In Arthur W. Galston & Christiana Z. Peppard (eds.), Expanding Horizons in Bioethics. Springer. 71--84.score: 590.4
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  12. Joseph R. Betancourt, Alexander R. Green & J. Emilio Carrillo (1999). The Challenges of Cross-Cultural Healthcare--Diversity, Ethics, and the Medical Encounter. Bioethics Forum 16 (3):27-32.score: 590.4
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  13. Mohammed Y. A. Rawwas, Ziad Swaidan & Mine Oyman (2005). Consumer Ethics: A Cross-Cultural Study of the Ethical Beliefs of Turkish and American Consumers. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 57 (2):183 - 195.score: 582.4
    The ethical climate in Turkey is beset by ethical problems. Bribery, environmental pollution, tax frauds, deceptive advertising, production of unsafe products, and the ethical violations that involved politicians and business professionals are just a few examples. The purpose of this study is to compare and contrast the ethical beliefs of American and Turkish consumers using the Ethical Position Questionnaire (EPQ) of Forsyth (1980), the Machiavellianism scale, and the Consumer Ethical Practices of Muncy and Vitell questionnaire (MVQ). A sample of 376 (...)
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  14. Caterina Caminiti, Francesca Diodati, Arianna Gatti, Saverio Santachiara & Sandro Spinsanti (2011). Current Functions of Italian Ethics Committees: A Cross-Sectional Study. Bioethics 25 (4):220-227.score: 572.0
    Background: The rapid pace of progress in medical research, the consequent need for the timely transfer of new knowledge into practice, and the increasing need for ethics support, is making the work of Ethics Committees (ECs) ever more complex and demanding. As a response, ECs in many countries exhibit large variation in number, mandate, organization and member competences. This cross-sectional study aims to give an overview of the different types of activities of Italian ECs and favour discussion (...)
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  15. Jing-Bao Nie (2000). The Plurality of Chinese and American Medical Moralities: Toward an Interpretive Cross-Cultural Bioethics. Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 10 (3):239-260.score: 547.2
    : Since the late 1970s, American appraisals of Chinese medical ethics and Chinese responses to American bioethics range from frank criticism to warm appreciation, from refutation to acceptance. Yet in the United States as well as in China, American bioethics and Chinese medical ethics have been seen, respectively, as individualistic and communitarian. In this widely-accepted general comparison, the great variation in the two medical moralities, especially the diversity of Chinese experiences, has been unfortunately minimized, if (...)
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  16. Goran Svensson, Greg Wood, Jang Singh, Emily Carasco & Michael Callaghan (2009). Ethical Structures and Processes of Corporations Operating in Australia, Canada, and Sweden: A Longitudinal and Cross-Cultural Study. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 86 (4):485 - 506.score: 540.4
    Based on the 'Partnership Model of Corporate Ethics' (Wood, 2002), this study examines the ethical structures and processes that are put in place by organizations to enhance the ethical business behavior of staff. The study examines the use of these structures and processes amongst the top companies in the three countries of Australia, Canada, and Sweden over two time periods (2001–2002 and 2005–2006). Subsequendy, a combined comparative and longitudinal approach is applied in the study, which we contend is a (...)
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  17. F. Cheng, Mary Ip, K. K. Wong & W. W. Yan (1998). Critical Care Ethics in Hong Kong: Cross-Cultural Conflicts as East Meets West. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 23 (6):616 – 627.score: 535.2
    The practice of critical care medicine has long been a difficult task for most critical care physicians in the densely populated city of Hong Kong, where we face limited resources and a limited number of intensive care beds. Our triage decisions are largely based on the potential of functional reversibility of the patients. Provision of graded care beds may help to relieve some of the demands on the intensive care beds. Decisions to forego futile medical treatment are frequently physician-guided (...)
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  18. Sebnem Burnaz, M. G. Serap Atakan, Y. Ilker Topcu & Anusorn Singhapakdi (2009). An Exploratory Cross-Cultural Analysis of Marketing Ethics: The Case of Turkish, Thai, and American Businesspeople. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 90 (3):371 - 382.score: 522.0
    This study compares the ethical decisionmaking processes of Turkish, Thai, and American businesspeople, considering perceived moral intensity (PMI), corporate ethical values (CEV), and perceived importance of ethics (PIE). PMI describes the ethical decision making at the individual level, CEV assesses the influences of the organization's ethical culture on the decisions of the individual, and PIE reveals what the businesspeople believe about the relationships among business, ethics, and long-run profitability. The survey respondents are professional marketers and businesspeople currently enrolled (...)
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  19. Susan M. Squier & Anne Hunsaker Hawkins (2004). Medical Humanities and Cultural Studies: Lessons Learned From an NEH Institute. [REVIEW] Journal of Medical Humanities 25 (4):243-253.score: 522.0
    In this essay, the directors of an NEH Institute on “Medicine, Literature, and Culture” consider the lessons they learned by bringing humanities scholars to a teaching hospital for a month-long institute that mingled seminar discussions, outside speakers and clinical observations. In an exchange of letters, they discuss the productive tensions inherent in approaching medicine from multiple perspectives, and they argue the case for a broader conception of medical humanities that incorporates the methodologies of cultural studies.
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  20. Chris J. Moon & Peter Woolliams (2000). Managing Cross Cultural Business Ethics. Journal of Business Ethics 27 (1-2):105 - 115.score: 520.2
    The Trompenaars database (1993) updated with Hampden-Turner (1998) has been assembled to help managers structure their cross cultural experiences in order to develop their competence for doing business and managing across the world. The database comprises more than 50,000 cases from over 100 countries and is one of the world's richest sources of social constructs. Woolliams and Trompenaars (1998) review the analysis undertaken by the authors in the last five years to develop the methodological approach underpinning the work. Recently Trompenaars (...)
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  21. Walter Bruchhausen (2001). Medizin Und Moral Ohne Kontext. Ethik in der Medizin 13 (3):176-192.score: 501.0
    Definition of the problem: Referring to the current critique of bioethics from the point of view of medical anthropology in North America, implications for moral philosophy and health care ethics are questioned. Arguments: The intrinsic and extrinsic flaws of common biomedical ethics as theory-driven ethics of principles and norms are also demonstrated in the German discussion of medical ethics (by reference to ’ethos’ and ’responsibility’) and ethical theory (especially phenomenology or hermeneutics). Objections to the (...)
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  22. Felicity Goodyear-Smith, Brenda Lobb, Graham Davies, Israel Nachson & Sheila Seelau (2002). International Variation in Ethics Committee Requirements: Comparisons Across Five Westernised Nations. [REVIEW] BMC Medical Ethics 3 (1):1-8.score: 498.8
    Background Ethics committees typically apply the common principles of autonomy, nonmaleficence, beneficence and justice to research proposals but with variable weighting and interpretation. This paper reports a comparison of ethical requirements in an international cross-cultural study and discusses their implications. Discussion The study was run concurrently in New Zealand, UK, Israel, Canada and USA and involved testing hypotheses about believability of testimonies regarding alleged child sexual abuse. Ethics committee requirements to conduct this study ranged from nil in (...)
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  23. L. -C. Huang, C. -H. Chen, H. -L. Liu, H. -Y. Lee, N. -H. Peng, T. -M. Wang & Y. -C. Chang (2013). The Attitudes of Neonatal Professionals Towards End-of-Life Decision-Making for Dying Infants in Taiwan. Journal of Medical Ethics 39 (6):382-386.score: 494.4
    The purposes of research were to describe the neonatal clinicians' personal views and attitudes on neonatal ethical decision-making, to identify factors that might affect these attitudes and to compare the attitudes between neonatal physicians and neonatal nurses in Taiwan. Research was a cross-sectional design and a questionnaire was used to reach different research purposes. A convenient sample was used to recruit 24 physicians and 80 neonatal nurses from four neonatal intensive care units in Taiwan. Most participants agreed with suggesting a (...)
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  24. John Cherry, Monle Lee & Charles S. Chien (2003). A Cross-Cultural Application of a Theoretical Model of Business Ethics: Bridging the Gap Between Theory and Data. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 44 (4):359 - 376.score: 490.2
    Hunt and Vitell''s General Theory (1992) is used in a cross-cultural comparison of U.S. and Taiwanese business practitioners. Results indicate that Taiwanese practitioners exhibit lower perceptions of an ethical issue in a scenario based on bribery, as well as milder deontological evaluations and ethical judgments relative to their U.S. counterparts. In addition, Taiwan respondents showed higher likelihood of making the payment. Several of the paths between variables in the theory are confirmed in both U.S. and Taiwan samples, with summary (...)
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  25. Donelson R. Forsyth, Ernest H. O.’Boyle & Michael A. McDaniel (2008). East Meets West: A Meta-Analytic Investigation of Cultural Variations in Idealism and Relativism. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 83 (4):813 - 833.score: 470.4
    Ethics position theory (EPT) maintains that individuals’ personal moral philosophies influence their judgments, actions, and emotions in ethically intense situations. The theory, when describing these moral viewpoints, stresses two dimensions: idealism (concern for benign outcomes) and relativism (skepticism with regards to inviolate moral principles). Variations in idealism and relativism across countries were examined via a meta-analysis of studies that assessed these two aspects of moral thought using the ethics position questionnaire (EPQ; Forsyth, Journal of Personality and Social (...)
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  26. C. Verharen, J. Tharakan, G. Middendorf, M. Castro-Sitiriche & G. Kadoda (2013). Introducing Survival Ethics Into Engineering Education and Practice. Science and Engineering Ethics 19 (2):599-623.score: 470.4
    Given the possibilities of synthetic biology, weapons of mass destruction and global climate change, humans may achieve the capacity globally to alter life. This crisis calls for an ethics that furnishes effective motives to take global action necessary for survival. We propose a research program for understanding why ethical principles change across time and culture. We also propose provisional motives and methods for reaching global consensus on engineering field ethics. Current interdisciplinary research in ethics, psychology, neuroscience and (...)
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  27. Donna L. Dickenson & Michael J. Parker (1999). The European Biomedical Ethics Practitioner Education Project: An Experiential Approach to Philosophy and Ethics in Health Care Education. Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 2 (3):231-237.score: 468.0
    The European Biomedical Ethics Practitioner Education Project (EBEPE), funded by the BIOMED programme of the European Commission, is a five-nation partnership to produce open learning materials for healthcare ethics education. Papers and case studies from a series of twelve conferences throughout the European Union, reflecting the ‘burning issues’ in the participants' healthcare systems, have been collected by a team based at Imperial College, London, where they are now being edited into a series of seven activity-based workbooks for (...)
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  28. Robert M. Veatch (1977). Case Studies in Medical Ethics. Harvard University Press.score: 462.6
    INTRODUCTION Five Questions of Ethics Medical ethics as a field presents a fundamental problem. As a branch of applied ethics, medical ethics becomes ...
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  29. Alastair V. Campbell (ed.) (1997). Medical Ethics. Oxford University Press.score: 460.8
    This book is intended as a practical introduction to the ethical problems which doctors and other health professionals can expect to encounter in their practice. It is divided into three parts: ethical foundations, clinical ethics, and medicine and society. The authors incorporate new chapters on topics such as theories of medical ethics, cultural aspects of medicine, genetic dilemmas, aging, dementia and mortality, research ethics, justice and health care (including an examination of resource allocation), and medicine, (...) and medical law. Medical Ethics also covers issues having to do with the beginning and end of life, as well as ethical questions surrounding the human body and the use of human tissue, confidentiality and AIDS, care of the mentally ill, and the implications of genetic technology. Each chapter presents a range of ethical views, drawing both from traditional philosophy and the most recent contemporary trends. The theoretical discussion is extended and illustrated by case studies and examples. This book is a non-technical guide to ethics written with the needs of medical students and medical practitioners in mind. It will also appeal to students and practitioners of allied health professions, and for all users of health care services. (shrink)
     
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  30. Kristina Orfali & Elisa Gordon (2004). Autonomy Gone Awry: A Cross-Cultural Study of Parents' Experiences in Neonatal Intensive Care Units. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 25 (4):329-365.score: 458.4
    This paper examines parents experiences of medical decision-making and coping with having a critically ill baby in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) from a cross-cultural perspective (France vs. U.S.A.). Though parents experiences in the NICU were very similar despite cultural and institutional differences, each system addresses their needs in a different way. Interviews with parents show that French parents expressed overall higher satisfaction with the care of their babies and were better able to cope with the loss (...)
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  31. Christian J. Resick, Paul J. Hanges, Marcus W. Dickson & Jacqueline K. Mitchelson (2006). A Cross-Cultural Examination of the Endorsement of Ethical Leadership. Journal of Business Ethics 63 (4):345 - 359.score: 457.6
    The western-based leadership and ethics literatures were reviewed to identify the key characteristics that conceptually define what it means to be an ethical leader. Data from the Global Leadership and Organizational Effectiveness (GLOBE) project were then used to analyze the degree to which four aspects of ethical leadership – Character/Integrity, Altruism, Collective Motivation, and Encouragement – were endorsed as important for effective leadership across cultures. First, using multi-group confirmatory factor analyses measurement equivalence of the ethical leadership scales was found, (...)
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  32. Md Zabid Rashid & Saidatul Ibrahim (2008). The Effect of Culture and Religiosity on Business Ethics: A Cross-Cultural Comparison. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 82 (4):907 - 917.score: 453.6
    This article examined the effect of culture and religiosity on perceptions of business ethics among students in a tertiary institution in Malaysia. A structured questionnaire was developed with scenarios on various aspects of business ethics, and self-administered to the students in the business studies program. The results from 767 respondents showed that there were significant differences among the Malays, Chinese, and Indian students on seven scenarios namely selling hazardous products, misleading instructions, selling defective products, padding expense account, (...)
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  33. Ali Ansari (2001). The Greening of Engineers: A Cross-Cultural Experience. Science and Engineering Ethics 7 (1):105-115.score: 453.6
    Experience with a group of mechanical engineering seniors at the University of Colorado led to an informal experiment with engineering students in India. An attempt was made to qualitatively gauge the students’ ability to appreciate a worldview different from the standard engineering worldview—that of a mechanical universe. Qualitative differences between organic and mechanical systems were used as a point of discussion. Both groups were found to exhibit distinct thought and behavior patterns which provide important clues for sensitizing engineers to environmental (...)
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  34. Linda Thorne & Susan Bartholomew Saunders (2002). The Socio-Cultural Embeddedness of Individuals' Ethical Reasoning in Organizations (Cross-Cultural Ethics). Journal of Business Ethics 35 (1):1 - 14.score: 451.8
    While models of business ethics increasingly recognize that ethical behavior varies cross-culturally, scant attention has been given to understanding how culture affects the ethical reasoning process that predicates individuals' ethical actions. To address this gap, this paper illustrates how culture may affect the various components of individuals' ethical reasoning by integrating findings from the cross-cultural management literature with cognitive-developmental perspective. Implications for future research and transnational organizations are discussed.
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  35. Oliver H. Osborne (1980). Cross-Cultural Social Science Research and Questions of Scientific Medical Imperialism. Bioethics Quarterly 2 (3):159-163.score: 451.2
    Concern for the rights and safety of individuals has caused clinical researchers to develop informed consent protocols for research involving human subjects. The applicapability of these regulations to social science research is often tenuous, since such research usually focuses on populations rather than individuals, and potential damage is apt to be political rather than personal. In cross-cultural social research, the protocols developed by Western clinical researchers may be not only ludicrously inapplicable, but intrusive and disruptive within the cultural context, (...)
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  36. N. Ondrusek, R. Abramovitch, P. Pencharz & G. Koren (1998). Empirical Examination of the Ability of Children to Consent to Clinical Research. Journal of Medical Ethics 24 (3):158-165.score: 450.4
    This study examined the quality of children's assent to a clinical trial. In subjects younger than 9 years of age, understanding of most aspects of the study was found to be poor to non-existent. Understanding of procedures was poor in almost all subjects. In addition, voluntariness may have been compromised in many subjects by their belief that failure to complete the study would displease others. If the fact that a child's assent has been obtained is used to justify the exposure (...)
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  37. S. A. Abu-Sahlieh (1995). No Distinction Between Male and Female Circumcision. Journal of Medical Ethics 21 (5):311-311.score: 446.4
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  38. R. Hoedemaekers, H. Have & R. Chadwick (1997). Genetic Screening: A Comparative Analysis of Three Recent Reports. Journal of Medical Ethics 23 (3):135-141.score: 446.4
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  39. Bryan W. Husted & David B. Allen (2008). Toward a Model of Cross-Cultural Business Ethics: The Impact of Individualism and Collectivism on the Ethical Decision-Making Process. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 82 (2):293 - 305.score: 444.0
    In this paper, we explore the impact of individualism and collectivism on three basic aspects of ethical decision making - the perception of moral problems, moral reasoning, and behavior. We argue that the inclusion of business practices within the moral domain by the individual depends partly upon individualism and collectivism. We also propose a pluralistic approach to post-conventional moral judgment that includes developmental paths appropriate for individualist and collectivist cultures. Finally, we argue that the link between moral judgment and behavior (...)
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  40. David A. Ralston & Allison Pearson (2010). The Cross-Cultural Evolution of the Subordinate Influence Ethics Measure. Journal of Business Ethics 96 (1):149 - 168.score: 441.0
    The purpose of our article is to describe the initial development process of the subordinate influence ethics (SIE) measure, an instrument that was crossculturally conceived, designed, and validity tested to measure upward influence ethics strategies of professional subordinates across different societies, as well as within a single society. Development of the SIE began by defining the SIE constructs through theoretical review and empirical (nominal group technique) assessments in Germany, France, Hong Kong, and the U. S. In the present (...)
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  41. Justin Tan & Irene Hau-Siu Chow (2009). Isolating Cultural and National Influence on Value and Ethics: A Test of Competing Hypotheses. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 88 (1):197 - 210.score: 440.8
    We live in an increasingly globalizing world, in which countries are closely linked by international trade and investment ties. Cross-cultural comparative studies of national values and ethics have attracted growing research interest in recent years, because shared practices, values and ethical standards depend on shared beliefs. However, the findings of such studies have been unable to reach a consensus on the impact of culture on ethics-related attitudes and behavior. Empirically, many "cross–cultural" differences reported by previous (...)
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  42. Mohamed M. Ahmed, Kun Young Chung & John W. Eichenseher (2003). Business Students' Perception of Ethics and Moral Judgment: A Cross-Cultural Study. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 43 (1-2):89 - 102.score: 438.4
    Business relations rely on shared perceptions of what is acceptable/expected norms of behavior. Immense expansion in transnational business made rudimentary consensus on acceptable business practices across cultural boundaries particularly important. Nonetheless, as more and more nations with different cultural and historical experiences interact in the global economy, the potential for misunderstandings based on different expectations is magnified. Such misunderstandings emerge in a growing literature on "improper" business practices – articulated from a narrow cultural perspective. This paper reports an ongoing research (...)
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  43. Jang Singh, Göran Svensson, Greg Wood & Michael Callaghan (2011). A Longitudinal and Cross-Cultural Study of the Contents of Codes of Ethics of Australian, Canadian and Swedish Corporations. Business Ethics 20 (1):103-119.score: 438.4
    This study uses a specific method to analyze the contents of the codes of ethics of the largest corporations in Australia, Canada and Sweden and compares the findings of similar content analyses in 2002 and 2006. It tracks changes in code contents across the three nations over the 2002–2006 period. There were statistically significant changes in the codes of the three countries from 2002 to 2006: the Australian and Canadian codes becoming more prescriptive, intensifying the differences between these and (...)
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  44. Mary C. Olson (1999). “The Heart Still Beat, but the Brain Doesn't Answer”. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 20 (1):85-95.score: 431.4
    The purpose of this exploratory and descriptive study was to examine old-age dementia in the Hmong community of Milwaukee, Wisconsin. Formal and informal Hmong leaders were interviewed to determine the prevalence of dementia in the Hmong community and how it is perceived and experienced. Interviews revealed few cases of dementia among the Hmong. Dementia was perceived as a natural part of the life cycle, rather than as a devastating disease that robs individuals of their autonomy. Treatment is not sought for (...)
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  45. Russell Abratt, Deon Nel & Nicola Susan Higgs (1992). An Examination of the Ethical Beliefs of Managers Using Selected Scenarios in a Cross-Cultural Environment. Journal of Business Ethics 11 (1):29 - 35.score: 429.6
    Academic literature addressing the topic of business ethics has paid little attention to cross-cultural studies of business ethics. Uncertainty exists concerning the effect of culture on ethical beliefs. The purpose of this research is to compare the ethical beliefs of managers operating in South Africa and Australia. Responses of 52 managers to a series of ethical scenarios were sought. Results indicate that despite differences in socio-cultural and political factors there are no statistically significant differences between the (...)
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  46. Zbigniew Bańkowski, J. Barzelatto & Alexander Morgan Capron (eds.) (1989). Ethics and Human Values in Family Planning: Conference Highlights, Papers, and Discussion: Xxii Cioms Conference, Bangkok, Thailand, 19-24 June 1988. [REVIEW] Cioms.score: 429.6
     
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  47. J. Brooke Hamilton, Stephen B. Knouse & Vanessa Hill (2009). Google in China: A Manager-Friendly Heuristic Model for Resolving Cross-Cultural Ethical Conflicts. Journal of Business Ethics 86 (2):143 - 157.score: 426.6
    Management practitioners and scholars have worked diligently to identify methods for ethical decision making in international contexts. Theoretical frameworks such as Integrative Social Contracts Theory (Donaldson and Dunfee, 1994, Academy of Management Review 19, 252–284) and more recently the Global Business Citizenship Approach [Wood et al., 2006, Global Business Citizenship: A Transformative Framework for Ethics and Sustainable Capitalism. (M. E. Sharpe, Armonk, NY)] have produced innovations in practice. Despite these advances, many managers have difficulty implementing these theoretical concepts in (...)
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  48. Carola Sandbacka (1987). Understanding Other Cultures: Studies in the Philosophical Problems of Cross-Cultural Interpretation. Distributed by Akateeminen Kirjakauppa.score: 426.6
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  49. John Cherry (2006). The Impact of Normative Influence and Locus of Control on Ethical Judgments and Intentions: A Cross-Cultural Comparison. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 68 (2):113 - 132.score: 422.0
    The study extends the Theory of Planned Behavior (TPB) in a cross-cultural setting, incorporating ethical judgments and locus of control in a comparison of Taiwanese and US businesspersons. A self-administered survey of 698 businesspersons from the US and Taiwan examined several hypothesized differences. Results indicate that while Taiwanese respondents have a more favorable attitude toward a requested bribe than US counterparts, and are less likely to view it as an ethical issue, their higher locus externality causes ethical judgments and (...)
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  50. Roger J. Volkema & Maria Tereza Leme Fleury (2002). Alternative Negotiating Conditions and the Choice of Negotiation Tactics: A Cross-Cultural Comparison. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 36 (4):381 - 398.score: 422.0
    The growth in international trade in recent years necessitates a better understanding of customs and expectations in cross-cultural negotiations. While several researchers have sought to examine and detail the similarities and differences between select countries, their data have generally been obtained under neutral or unspecified negotiating conditions. However, issue importance, opponent (prowess, ethical reputation), and context (location, confederate awareness, urgency) can play a significant role in the use of negotiating tactics. This paper describes a study comparing the perceptions of (...)
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