Search results for 'Medical ethics History' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Albert R. Jonsen (2000). A Short History of Medical Ethics. Oxford University Press.score: 176.0
    A physician says, "I have an ethical obligation never to cause the death of a patient," another responds, "My ethical obligation is to relieve pain even if the patient dies." The current argument over the role of physicians in assisting patients to die constantly refers to the ethical duties of the profession. References to the Hippocratic Oath are often heard. Many modern problems, from assisted suicide to accessible health care, raise questions about the traditional ethics of medicine and the (...)
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  2. Robert Baker & Laurence B. McCullough (eds.) (2009). The Cambridge World History of Medical Ethics. Cambridge University Press.score: 176.0
    The Cambridge World History of Medical Ethics is the first comprehensive scholarly account of the global history of medical ethics. Offering original interpretations of the field by leading bioethicists and historians of medicine, it will serve as the essential point of departure for future scholarship in the field. The volumes reconceptualize the history of medical ethics through the creation of new categories, including the life cycle; discourses of religion, philosophy, and bioethics; (...)
     
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  3. Andreas Frewer (2010). Human Rights From the Nuremberg Doctors Trial to the Geneva Declaration. Persons and Institutions in Medical Ethics and History. Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 13 (3):259-268.score: 159.0
    The “Universal Declaration of Human Rights” and the “Geneva Declaration” by the World Medical Association, both in 1948, were preceded by the foundation of the United Nations in New York (1945), the World Medical Association in London (1946) and the World Health Organization in Geneva (1948). After the end of World War II the community of nations strove to achieve and sustain their primary goals of peace and security, as well as their basic premise, namely the health of (...)
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  4. Donald Enloe Konold (1962). A History of American Medical Ethics, 1847-1912. Madison, State Historical Society of Wisconsin, for the Dept. Of History, University of Wisconsin.score: 147.0
  5. Ulf Schmidt (2007). Turning the History of Medical Ethics From its Head Onto its Feet: A Critical Commentary on Baker and McCullough. Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 17 (1):31-42.score: 119.0
    The paper provides a critical commentary on the article by Baker and McCullough on Medical Ethic's Appropriation of Moral Philosophy. The author argues that Baker and McCullough offer a more "pragmatic" approach to the history of medical ethics that has the potential to enrich the bioethics field with a greater historical grounding and sound methodology. Their approach can help us to come to a more nuanced understanding about the way in which medical ethics has (...)
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  6. Laurence B. McCullough (2002). Philosophical Challenges in Teaching Bioethics: The Importance of Professional Medical Ethics and its History for Bioethics. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 27 (4):395 – 402.score: 116.0
    The papers in this number of the Journal originated in a session sponsored by the American Philosophical Association's Committee on Philosophy and Medicine in 1999. The four papers and two commentaries identify and address philosophical challenges of how we should understand and teach bioethics in the liberal arts and health professions settings. In the course of introducing the six papers, this article explores themes these papers raise, especially the relationship among professional medical ethics, the "long history" of (...)
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  7. Laurence B. McCullough (2001). The History of Medical Ethics Is Crucial for a Critical Perspective in the Continuing Development of Ethics Consultation. American Journal of Bioethics 1 (4):55-57.score: 116.0
    (2001). The History of Medical Ethics Is Crucial for a Critical Perspective in the Continuing Development of Ethics Consultation. The American Journal of Bioethics: Vol. 1, No. 4, pp. 55-57.
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  8. Andreas-Holger Maehle (2009). Doctors, Honour, and the Law: Medical Ethics in Imperial Germany. Palgrave Macmillan.score: 116.0
    Disciplining doctors : medical courts of honour and professional conduct -- Medical confidentiality : the debate on private versus public interests -- Patient information and consent : self-determination versus paternalism -- Duties and habitus of a doctor : the literature on medical ethics.
     
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  9. Robert M. Veatch (2005). Disrupted Dialogue: Medical Ethics and the Collapse of Physician-Humanist Communication (1770-1980). Oxford University Press.score: 116.0
    Medical ethics changed dramatically in the past 30 years because physicians and humanists actively engaged each other in discussions that sometimes led to confrontation and controversy, but usually have improved the quality of medical decision-making. Before then medical ethics had been isolated for almost two centuries from the larger philosophical, social, and religious controversies of the time. There was, however, an earlier period where leaders in medicine and in the humanities worked closely together and both (...)
     
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  10. Thomas Stephen Szasz (1977/1988). The Theology of Medicine: The Political-Philosophical Foundations of Medical Ethics. Syracuse University Press.score: 114.0
    The essays assembled in this volume reflect my long-standing interest in moral philosophy and my conviction that the idea of a medical ethics as something ...
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  11. Giovanni Maio (1999). Is Etiquette Relevant to Medical Ethics? Ethics and Aesthetics in the Works of John Gregory (1724–1773). Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 2 (2):181-187.score: 114.0
    The writings of the Scottish physician and philosopher John Gregory play an important role in the modern codification of medical ethics. It is therefore appropriate to use his work as a historical example in approaching the question how elements of aesthetics were incorporated in 18th century medical ethics. The concept of a Gentleman is pivotal to the entire medical ethics of John Gregory as it provides him with the ethical source of the duty to (...)
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  12. D. Ojanuga (1993). The Medical Ethics of the 'Father of Gynaecology', Dr J Marion Sims. Journal of Medical Ethics 19 (1):28-31.score: 110.0
    Vesico-vaginal fistula (VVF) was a common ailment among American women in the 19th century. Prior to that time, no successful surgery had been developed for the cure of this condition until Dr J Marion Sims perfected a successful surgical technique in 1849. Dr Sims used female slaves as research subjects over a four-year period of experimentation (1845-1849). This paper discusses the controversy surrounding his use of powerless women and whether his actions were acceptable during that historical period.
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  13. Laurence B. McCullough (1999). Hume's Influence on John Gregory and the History of Medical Ethics. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 24 (4):376 – 395.score: 106.0
    The concept of medicine as a profession in the English-language literature of medical ethics is of recent vintage, invented by the Scottish physician and medical ethicist, John Gregory (1724-1773). Gregory wrote the first secular, philosophical, clinical, and feminine medical ethics and bioethics in the English language and did so on the basis of Hume's principle of sympathy. This paper provides a brief account of Gregory's invention and the role that Humean sympathy plays in that invention, (...)
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  14. Almut Caspary (2010). In Good Health: Philosophical-Theological Analysis of the Concept of Health in Contemporary Medical Ethics. Franz Steiner Verlag.score: 102.0
     
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  15. K. Boyd (1995). What Can Medical Ethics Learn From History? Journal of Medical Ethics 21 (4):197-198.score: 101.0
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  16. Robert Baker (ed.) (1999). The American Medical Ethics Revolution: How the Ama's Code of Ethics has Transformed Physicians' Relationships to Patients, Professionals, and Society. Johns Hopkins University Press.score: 99.0
    The American Medical Association enacted its Code of Ethics in 1847, the first such national codification. In this volume, a distinguished group of experts from the fields of medicine, bioethics, and history of medicine reflect on the development of medical ethics in the United States, using historical analyses as a springboard for discussions of the problems of the present, including what the editors call "a sense of moral crisis precipitated by the shift from a system (...)
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  17. David J. Rothman (2003/2008). Strangers at the Bedside: A History of How Law and Bioethics Transformed Medical Decision Making. Aldinetransaction.score: 99.0
    Introduction: making the invisible visible -- The nobility of the material -- Research at war -- The guilded age of research -- The doctor as whistle-blower -- New rules for the laboratory -- Bedside ethics -- The doctor as stranger -- Life through death -- Commissioning ethics -- No one to trust -- New rules for the bedside -- Epilogue: The price of success.
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  18. Dieter Birnbache (1999). The Socratic Method in Teaching Medical Ethics: Potentials and Limitations. Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 2 (3):219-224.score: 99.0
    The Socratic method has a long history in teaching philosophy and mathematics, marked by such names as Karl Weierstra, Leonard Nelson and Gustav Heckmann. Its basic idea is to encourage the participants of a learning group (of pupils, students, or practitioners) to work on a conceptual, ethical or psychological problem by their own collective intellectual effort, without a textual basis and without substantial help from the teacher whose part it is mainly to enforce the rigid procedural rules designed to (...)
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  19. Michael Ryan (2009). Michael Ryan's Writings on Medical Ethics. Springer.score: 99.0
    Michael Ryan (d. 1840) remains one of the most mysterious figures in the history of medical ethics, despite the fact that he was the only British physician during the middle years of the 19th century to write about ethics in a systematic way. Michael Ryan’s Writings on Medical Ethics offers both an annotated reprint of his key ethical writings, and an extensive introductory essay that fills in many previously unknown details of Ryan’s life, analyzes (...)
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  20. M. Parker (1995). Autonomy, Problem-Based Learning, and the Teaching of Medical Ethics. Journal of Medical Ethics 21 (5):305-310.score: 98.0
    Autonomy has been the central principle underpinning changes which have affected the practice of medicine in recent years. Medical education is undergoing changes as well, many of which are underpinned, at least implicitly, by increasing concern for autonomy. Some universities have embarked on graduate courses which utilize problem-based learning (PBL) techniques to teach all areas, including medical ethics. I argue that PBL is a desirable method for teaching and learning in medical ethics. It is desirable (...)
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  21. A. Baumann, G. Audibert, C. G. Lafaye, L. Puybasset, P. -M. Mertes & F. Claudot (2013). Elective Non-Therapeutic Intensive Care and the Four Principles of Medical Ethics. Journal of Medical Ethics 39 (3):139-142.score: 94.0
    The chronic worldwide lack of organs for transplantation and the continuing improvement of strategies for in situ organ preservation have led to renewed interest in elective non-therapeutic ventilation of potential organ donors. Two types of situation may be eligible for elective intensive care: patients definitely evolving towards brain death and patients suitable as controlled non-heart beating organ donors after life-supporting therapies have been assessed as futile and withdrawn. Assessment of the ethical acceptability and the risks of these strategies is essential. (...)
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  22. M. H. Kottow (1999). In Defence of Medical Ethics. Journal of Medical Ethics 25 (4):340-343.score: 94.0
    A number of recent publications by the philosopher David Seedhouse are discussed. Although medicine is an eminently ethical enterprise, the technical and ethical aspects of health care practices can be distinguished, therefore justifying the existence of medical ethics and its teaching as a specific part of every medical curriculum. The goal of teaching medical ethics is to make health care practitioners aware of the essential ethical aspects of their work. Furthermore, the contention that rational bioethics (...)
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  23. P. Riis (1993). Medical Ethics in the European Community. Journal of Medical Ethics 19 (1):7-12.score: 94.0
    Increasing European co-operation must take place in many areas, including medical ethics. Against the background of common cultural norms and pluralistic variation within political traditions, religion and lifestyles, Europe will have to converge towards unity within the field of medical ethics. This article examines how such convergence might develop with respect to four major areas: European research ethics committees, democratic health systems, the human genome project and rules for stopping futile treatments.
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  24. Laurence B. McCullough (1999). Laying Medicine Open: Understanding Major Turning Points in the History of Medical Ethics. Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 9 (1):7-23.score: 90.0
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  25. Joseph A. Bracken, Jacqueline Broad, Karen Green, Kristina Camilleri, Pheng Cheah & Suzanne Guerlac (2009). Baker, Robert B., and Laurence B. McCullough, Editors. The Cambridge World History of Medical Ethics. Cambridge-New York: Cambridge University Press, 2009. Pp. Xxviii+ 876. Cloth, $250.00. Bayer, Thora Ilin, and Donald Phillip Verene, Editors. Giambattista Vico: Keys to the New Science: Translations, Commentaries, and Essays. Ithaca-London: Cornell University Press, 2009. Pp. Xi+ 209. Paper, $17.95. [REVIEW] Journal of the History of Philosophy 47 (3):483-86.score: 90.0
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  26. Jacek A. Piątkiewicz (1992). A Brief History of Medical Ethics Code in Poland. Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 2 (4):361-362.score: 90.0
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  27. D. W. Amundsen (forthcoming). Medical Ethics, History of Europe. I. Ancient and Medieval. C. Medieval Christian Europe. Encyclopedia of Bioethics.score: 90.0
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  28. Chester Burns (2004). Medical Ethics, History of the Americas: Colonial North America and Nineteenthcentury United States. Encyclopedia of Bioethics 3:1517-23.score: 90.0
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  29. Harold J. Cook (forthcoming). Medical Ethics, History of Europe. II. Renaissance and Enlightenment. Encyclopedia of Bioethics.score: 90.0
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  30. D. Gracia & T. W. Reich (1995). Medical Ethics: History of Europe Southern Europe. Encyclopedia of Bioethics 3.score: 90.0
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  31. Terrence F. Ackerman (1989). A Casebook of Medical Ethics. Oxford University Press.score: 89.0
    Should a brain-dead woman be artificially maintained for the sake of her fetus? Does a physician have the right to administer a life-saving transfusion despite the patient's religious beliefs? Can a family request a hysterectomy for their retarded daughter? Physicians are facing moral dilemmas with increasing frequency. But how should these delicate questions be resolved and by whom? A Casebook of Medical Ethics offers a real-life view of the central issue involved in clinical medical ethics. Since (...)
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  32. Ulf Schmidt (2004). Justice at Nuremberg: Leo Alexander and the Nazi Doctors' Trial. Palgrave Macmillan.score: 89.0
    Justice at Nuremberg traces the history of the Nuremberg Doctors' Trial held in 1946-47, as seen through the eyes of the Austrian bliogemigrbliogé psychiatrist Leo Alexander. His investigations helped the United States to prosecute twenty German doctors and three administrators for war crimes and crimes against humanity. The legacy of Nuremberg was profound. In the Nuremberg code--a landmark in the history of modern medical ethics--the judges laid down, for the first time, international guidelines for permissible experiments (...)
     
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  33. John Mark Freeman (1987). Tough Decisions: A Casebook in Medical Ethics. Oxford University Press.score: 87.7
    Tough Decisions presents many of the complex medical-ethical issues likely to confront practitioners in critical situations. Through fictional but true-to-life cases, vividly described in clinical terms, the authors force the reader to choose among different courses of action and to confront a range of possible consequences. A two-year-old has been diagnosed with a malignant brain tumor. Who should be allowed to make decisions about the child's surgery and subsequent therapy, and on what basis? A family history of Huntington's (...)
     
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  34. Yitzhak Brand (2010). Essays: Religious Medical Ethics: A Study of the Rulings of Rabbi Waldenberg. Journal of Religious Ethics 38 (3):495-520.score: 87.0
    This article seeks to examine how religious ideas that are not the focus of a particular halakhic question become the crux of the ruling, thereby molding it and dictating its bias. We will attempt to demonstrate this through a study of Jewish medical ethics, based on some of the rulings of one of the greatest halakhic decisors of the previous generation: Rabbi Eliezer Yehuda Waldenberg (1915–2006). Rabbi Waldenberg molds his rulings on the basis of a religious principle asserting (...)
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  35. Clement A. Adebamowo (2010). Medical Ethics Education: A Survey of Opinion of Medical Students in a Nigerian University. [REVIEW] Journal of Academic Ethics 8 (2):85-93.score: 87.0
    In Nigeria, medical education remains focused on the traditional clinical and basic medical science components, leaving students to develop moral attitudes passively through observation and intuition. In order to ascertain the adequacy of this method of moral formations, we studied the opinions of medical students in a Nigerian university towards medical ethics training. Self administered semi-structured questionnaires were completed by final year medical students of the College of Medicine, University of Ibadan, Nigeria. There were (...)
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  36. Courtney S. Campbell (2001). Albert R. Jonsen, a Short History of Medical Ethics. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 22 (4):399-402.score: 87.0
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  37. Daniel M. Fox (1979). The Segregation of Medical Ethics: A Problem in Modern Intellectual History. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 4 (1):81-97.score: 87.0
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  38. Laurence B. McCullough (2002). Power, Integrity, and Trust in the Managed Practice of Medicine: Lessons From the History of Medical Ethics. Social Philosophy and Policy 19 (2):180-211.score: 87.0
  39. Goran Mijaljica (2013). Medical Ethics, Bioethics and Research Ethics Education Perspectives in South East Europe in Graduate Medical Education. Science and Engineering Ethics 20 (1):1-11.score: 87.0
    Ethics has an established place within the medical curriculum. However notable differences exist in the programme characteristics of different schools of medicine. This paper addresses the main differences in the curricula of medical schools in South East Europe regarding education in medical ethics and bioethics, with a special emphasis on research ethics, and proposes a model curriculum which incorporates significant topics in all three fields. Teaching curricula of Medical Schools in Bulgaria, Bosnia and (...)
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  40. Edmund D. Pellegrino (2012). Medical Ethics in an Era of Bioethics: Resetting the Medical Profession's Compass. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 33 (1):21-24.score: 87.0
    What it means to be a medical professional has been defined by medical ethicists throughout history and remains a contemporary concern addressed by this paper. A medical professional is generally considered to be one who makes a public promise to fulfill the ethical obligations expressed in the Hippocratic Code. This presentation summarizes the history of medical professionalism and refocuses attention on the interpersonal relationship of doctor and patient. This keynote address was delivered at the (...)
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  41. Y. M. Barilan & M. Brusa (2013). Deliberation at the Hub of Medical Education: Beyond Virtue Ethics and Codes of Practice. [REVIEW] Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 16 (1):3-12.score: 87.0
    Although both codes of practice and virtue ethics are integral to the ethos and history of “medical professionalism”, the two trends appear mutually incompatible. Hence, in the first part of the paper we explore and explicate this apparent conflict and seek a direction for medical education. The theoretical and empirical literature indicates that moral deliberation may transcend the incompatibilities between the formal and the virtuous, may enhance moral and other aspects of personal sensitivity, may help design (...)
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  42. Diego Gracia (2001). History of Medical Ethics. In. In H. Ten Have & Bert Gordijn (eds.), Bioethics in a European Perspective. Kluwer Academic Publishers. 17--50.score: 87.0
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  43. Laurence B. McCullough (2004). Taking the History of Medical Ethics Seriously in Teaching Medical Professionalism. American Journal of Bioethics 4 (2):13 – 14.score: 87.0
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  44. Gregory Lawrence Bock (2010). Albert R. Jonsen, A Short History of Medical Ethics Reviewed By. Philosophy in Review 30 (1):45-46.score: 87.0
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  45. Joseph J. Fins (2013). Review of John H. Evans, The History and Future of Medical Ethics: A Sociological View. [REVIEW] American Journal of Bioethics 13 (6):58 - 59.score: 87.0
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  46. Albert R. Jonsen & Andrew Jameton (forthcoming). History of Medical Ethics: The United States in the Twentieth Century. Encyclopedia of Bioethics.score: 87.0
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  47. Alan Jotkowitz (2014). The Seminal Contribution of Rabbi Moshe Feinstein to the Development of Modern Jewish Medical Ethics. Journal of Religious Ethics 42 (2):285-309.score: 87.0
    The purpose of this essay is to show how, on a wide variety of issues, Rabbi Moshe Feinstein broke new ground with the established Orthodox rabbinic consensus and blazed a new trail in Jewish medical ethics. Rabbi Feinstein took power away from the rabbis and let patients decide their treatment, he opened the door for a Jewish approach to palliative care, he supported the use of new technologies to aid in reproduction, he endorsed altruistic living organ donation and (...)
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  48. Rihito Kimura (forthcoming). History of Medical Ethics: Contemporary Japan. Encyclopedia of Bioethics.score: 87.0
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  49. Thomas K. McElhinney & Edmund D. Pellegrino (2001). The Institute on Human Values in Medicine: Its Role and Influence in the Conception and Evolution of Bioethics. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 22 (4):291-317.score: 85.0
    For ten years, 1971–1981, the Institute onHuman Values in Medicine (IHVM) played a keyrole in the development of Bioethics as afield. We have written this history andanalysis to bring to new generations ofBioethicists information about the developmentof their field within both the humanitiesdisciplines and the health professions. Thepioneers in medical humanities and ethics cametogether with medical professionals in thedecade of the 1960s. By the 1980s Bioethics wasa fully recognized discipline. We show the rolethat IHVM programs played (...)
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  50. V. Fineschi, E. Turillazzi & C. Cateni (1997). The New Italian Code of Medical Ethics. Journal of Medical Ethics 23 (4):239-244.score: 85.0
    In June 1995, the Italian code of medical ethics was revised in order that its principles should reflect the ever-changing relationship between the medical profession and society and between physicians and patients. The updated code is also a response to new ethical problems created by scientific progress; the discussion of such problems often shows up a need for better understanding on the part of the medical profession itself. Medical deontology is defined as the discipline for (...)
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