Search results for 'Medical ethics Philosophy' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Edmond A. Murphy (1997). Underpinnings of Medical Ethics. Johns Hopkins University Press.score: 131.0
    Thus far in the development of the discipline of medical ethics, the overriding concern has been with solutions to specific problems. But discussion is hampered by lack of understanding of the scope and methodology of medical ethics, and its scientific and philosophical basis. In Underpinnings of Medical Ethics Edmond A. Murphy, James J. Butzow, and Edward L. Suarez-Murias offer much-needed clarification of the purview, ontological basis, and methodology of a medical ethics that (...)
     
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  2. D. C. Thomasma (1980). A Philosophy of a Clinically Based Medical Ethics. Journal of Medical Ethics 6 (4):190-196.score: 130.0
    Pellegrino and Siegler have argued that medical ethics must be taught 'at the bedside', or clinically. This paper is an attempt to establish the need for clinical teaching of medical ethics both to medical students and to medical ethicists who are not physicians. Through a critique of six positions regarding the aims of medical ethics, four principles are established which are the basis of a philosophy of education for medical (...). The need for a clinically-based educational programme in medical ethics is thereby established, not on practical grounds, but on solid philosophical ones. The paper concludes with practical examples of a clinically-based medical ethics programme following from the four principles. (shrink)
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  3. Thomas Stephen Szasz (1977/1988). The Theology of Medicine: The Political-Philosophical Foundations of Medical Ethics. Syracuse University Press.score: 129.0
    The essays assembled in this volume reflect my long-standing interest in moral philosophy and my conviction that the idea of a medical ethics as something ...
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  4. Fredrik Svenaeus (2000). The Hermeneutics of Medicine and the Phenomenology of Health: Steps Towards a Philosophy of Medical Practice. Kluwer Academic Publishers.score: 123.0
    Fredrik Svenaeus' book is a delight to read. Not only does he exhibit keen understanding of a wide range of topics and figures in both medicine and philosophy, but he manages to bring them together in an innovative manner that convincingly demonstrates how deeply these two significant fields can be and, in the end, must be mutually enlightening. Medicine, Svenaeus suggests, reveals deep but rarely explicit themes whose proper comprehension invites a careful phenomenological and hermeneutical explication. Certain philosophical approaches, (...)
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  5. Joseph B. R. Gaie (2004). The Ethics of Medical Involvement in Capital Punishment: A Philosophical Discussion. Kluwer Academic.score: 121.0
    This book examines the extremely important issue of the consistency of medical involvement in ending lives in medicine, law and war. It uses philosophical theory to show why medical doctors may be involved at different stages of the capital punishment process. The author uses the theories of Emmanuel Kant and John S. Mill, combined with Gerwith's principle of generic consistency, to concretize ethics in capital punishment practice. This book does not discuss the moral justification of capital punishment, (...)
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  6. James Giordano (2010). Respice...Prospice: Philosophy, Ethics and Medical Care- Past, Present, and Future. [REVIEW] Philosophy, Ethics, and Humanities in Medicine 5 (1):1-3.score: 120.0
    Respice...prospice: Philosophy, ethics and the character of medical care for the future.
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  7. Robert Baker & Laurence B. McCullough (2007). The Relationship Between Moral Philosophy and Medical Ethics Reconsidered. Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 17 (3):271-276.score: 119.0
    : Medical ethics often is treated as applied ethics, that is, the application of moral philosophy to ethical issues in medicine. In an earlier paper, we examined instances of moral philosophy's influence on medical ethics. We found the applied ethics model inadequate and sketched an alternative model. On this model, practitioners seeking to change morality "appropriate" concepts and theory fragments from moral philosophy to valorize and justify their innovations. Goldilocks-like, five commentators (...)
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  8. Robert Baker & Laurence B. McCullough (2007). Medical Ethics' Appropriation of Moral Philosophy: The Case of the Sympathetic and the Unsympathetic Physician. Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 17 (1):3-22.score: 119.0
    Philosophy textbooks typically treat bioethics as a form of "applied ethics"-i.e., an attempt to apply a moral theory, like utilitarianism, to controversial ethical issues in biology and medicine. Historians, however, can find virtually no cases in which applied philosophical moral theory influenced ethical practice in biology or medicine. In light of the absence of historical evidence, the authors of this paper advance an alternative model of the historical relationship between philosophical ethics and medical ethics, the (...)
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  9. Robert M. Veatch (2006). How Philosophy of Medicine has Changed Medical Ethics. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 31 (6):585 – 600.score: 119.0
    The celebration of thirty years of publication of The Journal of Medicine and Philosophy provides an opportunity to reflect on how medical ethics has evolved over that period. The reshaping of the field has occurred in no small part because of the impact of branches of philosophy other than ethics. These have included influences from Kantian theory of respect for persons, personal identity theory, philosophy of biology, linguistic analysis of the concepts of health and (...)
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  10. Elena Aronova (2009). In Search of the Soul in Science: Medical Ethics' Appropriation of Philosophy of Science in the 1970s. History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 31 (1):5 - 33.score: 119.0
    This paper examines the deployment of science studies within the field of medical ethics. For a short time, the discourse of medical ethics became a fertile ground for a dialogue between philosophically minded bioethicists and the philosophers of science who responded to Thomas Kuhn's challenge. In their discussion of the validity of Kuhn's work, these bioethicists suggested a distinct interpretation of Kuhn, emphasizing the elements in his account that had been independently developed by Michael Polanyi, and (...)
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  11. A. H. Hawkins (1996). Literature, Philosophy, and Medical Ethics: Let the Dialogue Go On. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 21 (3):341-354.score: 119.0
    This is a reply to Dan Clouser's philosophical commentary on the essays in this issue. Important assumptions that condition his perspective on the essays are identified and analyzed. Attention is drawn to his unhistorical emphasis on the exclusive importance of philosophy in ethical thought, and his resulting insistence that any discipline wishing to contribute to biomedical discourse must adopt the assumptions and methodologies of philosophy. Clouser's “three tenets” are examined, and then the question of what literature, considered in (...)
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  12. Michael H. Kottow (1999). Theoretical Aids in Teaching Medical Ethics. Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 2 (3):225-229.score: 117.0
    Medical ethics could be better understood if some basic theoretical aspects of practices in health care are analysed. By discussing the underlying ethical principles that govern medical practice, the student should also become familiar with the notion that medical ethics is much more than the external application of socially accepted moral standards. Professions in general and medicine in particular have internal values that command their moral virtuosity at the same time as their technical excellence. Three (...)
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  13. Nafsika Athanassoulis (ed.) (2005). Philosophical Reflections on Medical Ethics. Palgrave Macmillan.score: 116.0
    This collection brings together original essays demonstrating the cutting edge of philosophical research in medical ethics. With contributions from a range of established and up-and-coming authors, it examines topics at the forefront of medical technology, such as ethical issues raised by developments in how we research stem cells and genetic engineering, as well as new questions raised by methodological changes in how we approach medical ethics.
     
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  14. Constantinos Deltas, Helenē Kalokairinou & Sabine Rogge (eds.) (2006). Progress in Science and the Danger of Hubris: Genetics, Transplantation, Stem Cell Research: Proceedings of the First International Conference on Medical Ethics, Nicosia, 24-26 September 2004. [REVIEW] Waxmann.score: 114.0
    Introduction The present volume contains the proceedings of the First International Conference on Medical Ethics which took place in Nicosia, from the 24th ...
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  15. Tamara Kohn & Rosemary McKechnie (eds.) (1999). Extending the Boundaries of Care: Medical Ethics and Caring Practices. Berg.score: 114.0
    How is the concept of patient care adapting in response to rapid changes in healthcare delivery and advances in medical technology? How are questions of ethical responsibility and social diversity shaping the definitions of healthcare? In this topical study, scholars in anthropology, nursing theory, law and ethics explore questions involving the changing relationship between patient care and medical ethics. Contributors address issues that challenge the boundaries of patient care, such as: · HIV-related care and research · (...)
     
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  16. Edmund D. Pellegrino (1981). A Philosophical Basis of Medical Practice: Toward a Philosophy and Ethic of the Healing Professions. Oxford University Press.score: 105.0
     
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  17. Dieter Birnbache (1999). The Socratic Method in Teaching Medical Ethics: Potentials and Limitations. Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 2 (3):219-224.score: 102.0
    The Socratic method has a long history in teaching philosophy and mathematics, marked by such names as Karl Weierstra, Leonard Nelson and Gustav Heckmann. Its basic idea is to encourage the participants of a learning group (of pupils, students, or practitioners) to work on a conceptual, ethical or psychological problem by their own collective intellectual effort, without a textual basis and without substantial help from the teacher whose part it is mainly to enforce the rigid procedural rules designed to (...)
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  18. Osamu Muramoto (2014). Retrospective Diagnosis of a Famous Historical Figure: Ontological, Epistemic, and Ethical Considerations. Philosophy, Ethics, and Humanities in Medicine 9 (1):10.score: 102.0
    The aim of this essay is to elaborate philosophical and ethical underpinnings of posthumous diagnosis of famous historical figures based on literary and artistic products, or commonly called retrospective diagnosis. It discusses ontological and epistemic challenges raised in the humanities and social sciences, and attempts to systematically reply to their criticisms from the viewpoint of clinical medicine, philosophy of medicine, particularly the ontology of disease and the epistemology of diagnosis, and medical ethics. The ontological challenge focuses on (...)
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  19. David C. Thomasma & Edmund D. Pellegrino (1981). Philosophy of Medicine as the Source for Medical Ethics. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 2 (1):5-11.score: 101.0
    The article offers an approach to inquiry about, the foundation of medical ethics by addressing three areas of conceptual presupposition basic to medical ethical theory. First, medical ethics must presuppose a view about the nature of medicine. it is argued that the view required by a cogent medical morality entails that medicine be seen both as a healing relationship and as a practical art. Three ways in which medicine inherently involves values and valuation are (...)
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  20. J. Arbuthnot (1980). Philosophy and Teaching Medical Ethics. Journal of Medical Ethics 6 (1):27-29.score: 101.0
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  21. J. Haldane (1995). Medical Ethics Today: Its Practice and Philosophy. Journal of Medical Ethics 21 (2):120-120.score: 101.0
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  22. S. G. Potts (1990). Philosophy and Practice of Medical Ethics. Journal of Medical Ethics 16 (3):162-162.score: 101.0
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  23. S. Holm (2005). Bioethics Down Under--Medical Ethics Engages with Political Philosophy. Journal of Medical Ethics 31 (1):1-1.score: 101.0
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  24. Almut Caspary (2010). In Good Health: Philosophical-Theological Analysis of the Concept of Health in Contemporary Medical Ethics. Franz Steiner Verlag.score: 100.0
     
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  25. Charles Foster (2009). Choosing Life, Choosing Death: The Tyranny of Autonomy in Medical Ethics and Law. Hart Pub..score: 100.0
  26. Robert Baker & Laurence B. McCullough (eds.) (2009). The Cambridge World History of Medical Ethics. Cambridge University Press.score: 99.0
    The Cambridge World History of Medical Ethics is the first comprehensive scholarly account of the global history of medical ethics. Offering original interpretations of the field by leading bioethicists and historians of medicine, it will serve as the essential point of departure for future scholarship in the field. The volumes reconceptualize the history of medical ethics through the creation of new categories, including the life cycle; discourses of religion, philosophy, and bioethics; and the (...)
     
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  27. Alastair V. Campbell (ed.) (1997). Medical Ethics. Oxford University Press.score: 99.0
    This book is intended as a practical introduction to the ethical problems which doctors and other health professionals can expect to encounter in their practice. It is divided into three parts: ethical foundations, clinical ethics, and medicine and society. The authors incorporate new chapters on topics such as theories of medical ethics, cultural aspects of medicine, genetic dilemmas, aging, dementia and mortality, research ethics, justice and health care (including an examination of resource allocation), and medicine, (...) and medical law. Medical Ethics also covers issues having to do with the beginning and end of life, as well as ethical questions surrounding the human body and the use of human tissue, confidentiality and AIDS, care of the mentally ill, and the implications of genetic technology. Each chapter presents a range of ethical views, drawing both from traditional philosophy and the most recent contemporary trends. The theoretical discussion is extended and illustrated by case studies and examples. This book is a non-technical guide to ethics written with the needs of medical students and medical practitioners in mind. It will also appeal to students and practitioners of allied health professions, and for all users of health care services. (shrink)
     
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  28. Rosamond Rhodes, Leslie Francis & Anita Silvers (eds.) (2007). The Blackwell Guide to Medical Ethics. Blackwell Pub..score: 99.0
    The Blackwell Guide to Medical Ethics is a guide to the complex literature written on the increasingly dense topic of ethics in relation to the new technologies of medicine. Examines the key ethical issues and debates which have resulted from the rapid advances in biomedical technology Brings together the leading scholars from a wide range of disciplines, including philosophy, medicine, theology and law, to discuss these issues Tackles such topics as ending life, patient choice, selling body (...)
     
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  29. M. Parker (1995). Autonomy, Problem-Based Learning, and the Teaching of Medical Ethics. Journal of Medical Ethics 21 (5):305-310.score: 98.0
    Autonomy has been the central principle underpinning changes which have affected the practice of medicine in recent years. Medical education is undergoing changes as well, many of which are underpinned, at least implicitly, by increasing concern for autonomy. Some universities have embarked on graduate courses which utilize problem-based learning (PBL) techniques to teach all areas, including medical ethics. I argue that PBL is a desirable method for teaching and learning in medical ethics. It is desirable (...)
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  30. Edmund D. Pellegrino (2008). The Philosophy of Medicine Reborn: A Pellegrino Reader. University of Notre Dame Press.score: 98.0
    What the philosophy of medicine is -- Philosophy of medicine: should it be teleologically or socially construed? -- The internal morality of clinical medicine: a paradigm for the ethics of the helping and healing professions -- Humanistic basis of professional ethics -- The commodification of medical and health care: the moral consequences of a paradigm shift from a professional to a market ethic -- Medicine today: its identity, its role, and the role of physicians -- (...)
     
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  31. David J. Casarett (1999). Moral Perception and the Pursuit of Medical Philosophy. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 20 (2):125-139.score: 96.0
    This paper begins by examining the claim that the practice of medicine is essentially a moral endeavor. According to this view, all clinical practice has moral content, and each clinical situation has a moral dimension. I suggest that in order to recognize this moral dimension, clinicians must engage in an interpretive process, and that they must be able to interpret clinical data in ethical terms. However, clinicians often lack the ‘moral perception’ required to appreciate this moral dimension. I will argue (...)
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  32. Raphael Sassower & Michael A. Grodin (1988). Beyond Medical Ethics: New Directions for Philosophy and Medicine. [REVIEW] Journal of Medical Humanities and Bioethics 9 (2):121-134.score: 96.0
    A unique relationship exists between physicians and philosophers — one that expands on the constructive potential of the liaison between physicians and, for example, theologians, on the one hand, or, social workers on the other. This liaison should focus in the scientific aspects of medicine, not just the ethical aspects. Philosophers can provide physicians with a perspective on both the philosophy and the history of medicine through the ages — a sense of how medicine has adapted to the social (...)
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  33. Edmund D. Pellegrino (1993). The Virtues in Medical Practice. Oxford University Press.score: 94.0
    In recent years, virtue theories have enjoyed a renaissance of interest among general and medical ethicists. This book offers a virtue-based ethic for medicine, the health professions, and health care. Beginning with a historical account of the concept of virtue, the authors construct a theory of the place of the virtues in medical practice. Their theory is grounded in the nature and ends of medicine as a special kind of human activity. The concepts of virtue, the virtues, and (...)
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  34. A. Baumann, G. Audibert, C. G. Lafaye, L. Puybasset, P. -M. Mertes & F. Claudot (2013). Elective Non-Therapeutic Intensive Care and the Four Principles of Medical Ethics. Journal of Medical Ethics 39 (3):139-142.score: 94.0
    The chronic worldwide lack of organs for transplantation and the continuing improvement of strategies for in situ organ preservation have led to renewed interest in elective non-therapeutic ventilation of potential organ donors. Two types of situation may be eligible for elective intensive care: patients definitely evolving towards brain death and patients suitable as controlled non-heart beating organ donors after life-supporting therapies have been assessed as futile and withdrawn. Assessment of the ethical acceptability and the risks of these strategies is essential. (...)
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  35. M. H. Kottow (1999). In Defence of Medical Ethics. Journal of Medical Ethics 25 (4):340-343.score: 94.0
    A number of recent publications by the philosopher David Seedhouse are discussed. Although medicine is an eminently ethical enterprise, the technical and ethical aspects of health care practices can be distinguished, therefore justifying the existence of medical ethics and its teaching as a specific part of every medical curriculum. The goal of teaching medical ethics is to make health care practitioners aware of the essential ethical aspects of their work. Furthermore, the contention that rational bioethics (...)
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  36. P. Riis (1993). Medical Ethics in the European Community. Journal of Medical Ethics 19 (1):7-12.score: 94.0
    Increasing European co-operation must take place in many areas, including medical ethics. Against the background of common cultural norms and pluralistic variation within political traditions, religion and lifestyles, Europe will have to converge towards unity within the field of medical ethics. This article examines how such convergence might develop with respect to four major areas: European research ethics committees, democratic health systems, the human genome project and rules for stopping futile treatments.
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  37. Michael Gelfand (1968). Philosophy and Ethics of Medicine. London, E. & S. Livingstone.score: 94.0
     
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  38. Kate Rossiter (2012). Bearing Response-Ability: Theater, Ethics and Medical Education. [REVIEW] Journal of Medical Humanities 33 (1):1-14.score: 92.0
    This paper addresses a growing concern within the medical humanities community regarding the perceived need for a more empathically-focused medical curricula, and advocates for the use of creative pedagogical forms as a means to attend to issues of suffering and relationality. Drawing from the ethical philosophy of Emmanuel Levinas, I critique the notion of empathy on the basis that it erases difference and disregards otherness. Rather, I propose that the concept of empathy may be usefully replaced with (...)
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  39. Caroline Whitbeck (1981). On the Aims of Medicine: Comments on 'Philosophy of Medicine as the Source for Medical Ethics'. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 2 (1):35-41.score: 90.0
    Health defined as the psychophysiological capacity to act or respond appropriately in a wide variety of situations, is enhanced by many means other than preventing and treating disease and injury. Therefore no choice of a particular medical intervention is likely to maximize health for all people with (or at risk for) a given disease. As a result, if medical practitioners are to be fully competent in the sense of knowing not only how to perform procedures but when and (...)
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  40. John C. Moskop (1982). Book Review:Philosophy and Medicine Series. H. Tristram Engelhardt, Jr., Stuart F. Spicker; Philosophy and Medicine Series. Vol. 1: Explanation and Evaluation in the Biomedical Sciences. H. Tristram Engelhardt, Jr., Stuart F. Spicker; Philosophy and Medicine Series. Vol. 2: Philosophical Dimensions of the Neuro-Medical Sciences. Stuart F. Spicker, H. Tristram Engelhardt, Jr.; Philosophy and Medicine Series. Vol. 3: Philosophical Medical Ethics: Its Nature and Significance. Stuart F. Spicker, H. Tristram Engelhardt, Jr.; Philosophy and Medicine Series. Vol. 4. Mental Health: Philosophical Perspectives. H. Tristram Engelhardt, Jr., Stuart F. Spicker; Philosophy and Medicine Series. Vol. 5: Mental Illness: Law and Public Policy. Baruch A. Brody, H. Tristram Engelhardt, Jr.; Philosophy and Medicine Series. Vol. 6: Clinical Judgment: A Critical Appraisal. H. Tristram Engelhardt, Jr., Stuart F. Spicker, Bernard Towers; Philosophy and Medicine Series. Vol. 7. Organism, Medicine, and Metaphysi. [REVIEW] Ethics 92 (2):381-.score: 90.0
  41. William E. Stempsey (1999). The Quarantine of Philosophy in Medical Education: Why Teaching the Humanities May Not Produce Humane Physicians. Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 2 (1):3-9.score: 90.0
    Patients increasingly see physicians not as humane caregivers but as unfeeling technicians. The study of philosophy in medical school has been proposed to foster critical thinking about one's assumptions, perspectives and biases, encourage greater tolerance toward the ideas of others, and cultivate empathy. I suggest that the study of ethics and philosophy by medical students has failed to produce the humane physicians we seek because of the way the subject matter is quarantined in American (...) education. First, the liberal arts are seen as the province of undergraduate education, and not medical school. Second, philosophy, when taught in medical school, is seen by students as just one subject to be mastered along with many other more important ones, and not as a way to foster critical thinking and empathy. What is needed is a new pedagogy that combines both cognitive and affective elements to implant and nourish the liberal arts in students. Removing the quarantine of philosophy from other facets of medical education is an important first step. (shrink)
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  42. Nance Cunningham Butler (1985). Applied Philosophy in Health Care Outside the Medical Ethics Arena. International Journal of Applied Philosophy 2 (3):75-80.score: 90.0
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  43. Michael Loughlin, Ross E. G. Upshur, Maya J. Goldenberg, Robyn Bluhm & Kirstin Borgerson (2010). Philosophy, Ethics, Medicine and Health Care: The Urgent Need for Critical Practice. Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 16 (2):249-259.score: 90.0
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  44. Kimberly Garchar & John Kaag (2014). Classical American Philosophy and Modern Medical Ethics: The Case of Richard Cabot. Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society: A Quarterly Journal in American Philosophy 49 (4):553-574.score: 90.0
    In November of 1893, Richard Cabot euthanized his brother Ted, who was suffering from the effects of untreated diabetes. Richard assumed responsibility of Ted’s care in June of that year and administered many treatments to ease the suffering and symptoms of his brother. These treatments, however, were ultimately ineffective to stave off the pain of renal failure and infection. Richard adored his older brother, and according to him, was the one that Richard “loved best.” As the date of Ted’s euthanization (...)
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  45. Heiner Klemme (1999). John Gregory and the Invention of Professional Medical Ethics and the Profession of Medicine, And: John Gregory's Writings on Medical Ethics and Philosophy of Medicine, And: Medicine and Morals in the Enlightenment: John Gregory, Thomas Percival and Benjamin Rush (Review). Journal of the History of Philosophy 37 (3):535-538.score: 90.0
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  46. R. Meakin (2004). Editorial: Philosophy in the Undergraduate Medical Curriculum-- Beyond Medical Ethics. Medical Humanities 30 (1):53-53.score: 90.0
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  47. M. L. S. Bette Anton (2006). G. Caleb Alexander, MD, MS is Assistant Professor, Department of Medicine Affiliate Faculty and Robert Wood Johnson Clinical Scholars Program Affiliate Faculty, MacLean Center for Clinical Medical Ethics, Chicago, Illinois. Fritz Allhoff is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Philosophy at Western Michigan University in Kalamazoo. Before Coming to Western Michi. [REVIEW] Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 15:337-340.score: 90.0
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  48. Michael Boylan (2008). Margaret Pabst Battin, MFA, Ph. D. Is Distinguished Professor of Philosophy and Adjunct Professor of Internal Medicine in the Division of Medical Ethics and Humanities at the University of Utah. The Author of Prize-Winning Short Stories and Recipient of the University of Utah's Distinguished Research Award, She has Authored, Edited, or Coedited Fifteen Books, Among Them a Study of Philosophical. [REVIEW] In , International Public Health Policy & Ethics. Dordrecht. 42--289.score: 90.0
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  49. Thomas A. Cavanaugh, Jean E. Chambers, Tony Cornford, Leonard M. Fleck, Matti Häyry & Thomas K. Hazlet (2001). Mary HM Bach is a Student in the School of Pharmacy at the University of Washington, Seattle. Keith A. Bauer, MSW, is a Graduate Student in the Department of Philosophy/Medical Ethics at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville. His Dissertation Addresses the Ethics and Social Dimensions of Home-Based Telemedicine, the Use of Infor. [REVIEW] Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 10:123-124.score: 90.0
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  50. Wim Dekkers & Bert Gordijn (2010). Conceptual Analysis and Empirical Research in Medical Philosophy and Medical Ethics. Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 13 (1):1-2.score: 90.0
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