Search results for 'Medical ethics Social aspects' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Robert Baker (ed.) (1999). The American Medical Ethics Revolution: How the Ama's Code of Ethics has Transformed Physicians' Relationships to Patients, Professionals, and Society. Johns Hopkins University Press.score: 684.0
    The American Medical Association enacted its Code of Ethics in 1847, the first such national codification. In this volume, a distinguished group of experts from the fields of medicine, bioethics, and history of medicine reflect on the development of medical ethics in the United States, using historical analyses as a springboard for discussions of the problems of the present, including what the editors call "a sense of moral crisis precipitated by the shift from a system of (...)
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  2. M. H. Kottow (1999). In Defence of Medical Ethics. Journal of Medical Ethics 25 (4):340-343.score: 630.0
    A number of recent publications by the philosopher David Seedhouse are discussed. Although medicine is an eminently ethical enterprise, the technical and ethical aspects of health care practices can be distinguished, therefore justifying the existence of medical ethics and its teaching as a specific part of every medical curriculum. The goal of teaching medical ethics is to make health care practitioners aware of the essential ethical aspects of their work. Furthermore, the contention that (...)
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  3. David N. Weisstub (ed.) (1998). Research on Human Subjects: Ethics, Law, and Social Policy. Pergamon.score: 588.0
    There have been serious controversies in the latter part of the 20th century about the roles and functions of scientific and medical research. In whose interests are medical and biomedical experiments conducted and what are the ethical implications of experimentation on subjects unable to give competent consent? From the decades following the Second World War and calls for the global banning of medical research to the cautious return to the notion that in controlled circumstances, medical research (...)
     
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  4. Melanie Phillips (1985). Doctors' Dilemmas: Medical Ethics and Contemporary Science. Methuen.score: 564.0
     
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  5. Alan Cribb (2005). Health and the Good Society: Setting Healthcare Ethics in Social Context. Oxford University Press.score: 552.0
    What is health policy for? In Health and the Good Society, Alan Cribb addresses this question in a way that cuts across disciplinary boundaries. His core argument is that biomedical ethics should draw upon public health values and ethics; specifically, he argues that everybody has some share of responsibility for health, including a responsibility for promoting greater health equality. In the process, Cribb argues for a major rethink of the whole project of health education.
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  6. Kenneth R. Overberg (2006). Ethics and Aids: Compassion and Justice in a Global Crisis. Rowman & Littlefield Publishers, Inc..score: 456.0
    Introduction : confronting numbness -- Basic facts about HIV/AIDS -- Ethical foundations -- Ethics and the beginning of life -- Ethics and relationships -- Ethics and the end of life -- Ethics and society -- Ethics and global structures -- Creating the future -- Appendix I : the mystery of God and suffering -- Appendix II : preparing now for the hour of death.
     
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  7. Michael Parker (ed.) (1999). Ethics and Community in the Health Care Professions. Routledge.score: 448.0
    This volume explores the focus of interest in community and the emerging theoretical opposition between communitarianism and liberalism, including the practical, theoretical and ethical issues that relate to community in the healthcare professions.
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  8. C. Barry Hoffmaster (ed.) (2001). Bioethics in Social Context. Temple University Press.score: 444.0
    Yet these forces are largely ignored by a professional bioethics that concentrates on the theoretical justification of decisions.The original essays in this ...
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  9. Sonja Olin-Lauritzen & Lars-Christer Hydén (eds.) (2007). Medical Technologies and the Life World: The Social Construction of Normality. Routledge.score: 440.0
    Although the use of new health technologies in healthcare and medicine is generally seen as beneficial, there has been little analysis of the impact of such technologies on people's lives and understandings of health and illness. This book explores how new technologies not only provide hope for cure and well-being, but also introduce new ethical dilemmas and raise questions about the "natural" body. Focusing on the ways new health technologies intervene into our lives and affect our ideas about normalcy, the (...)
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  10. Bradford H. Gray (1981). Human Subjects in Medical Experimentation: A Sociological Study of the Conduct and Regulation of Clinical Research. R.E. Krieger Pub. Co..score: 432.0
     
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  11. Bernard Barber (ed.) (1978). Medical Ethics and Social Change. American Academy of Political and Social Science.score: 432.0
     
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  12. Kasper Lippert-Rasmussen, Mads Rosendahl Thomsen & Jacob Wamberg (eds.) (2012). The Posthuman Condition: Ethics, Aesthetics and Politics of Biotechnological Challenges. Aarhus University Press ;.score: 432.0
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  13. Fabio Marino (2007). Bioetica Sociale Tra Scienza E Vita: Quale Principio Etico Per la Prassi Bioetica? Aracne.score: 420.0
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  14. Sabine Salloch, Jan Schildmann & Jochen Vollmann (2012). Empirical Research in Medical Ethics: How Conceptual Accounts on Normative-Empirical Collaboration May Improve Research Practice. BMC Medical Ethics 13 (1):5.score: 414.0
    BackgroundThe methodology of medical ethics during the last few decades has shifted from a predominant use of normative-philosophical analyses to an increasing involvement of empirical methods. The articles which have been published in the course of this so-called 'empirical turn' can be divided into conceptual accounts of empirical-normative collaboration and studies which use socio-empirical methods to investigate ethically relevant issues in concrete social contexts.DiscussionA considered reference to normative research questions can be expected from good quality empirical research (...)
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  15. A. Baumann, G. Audibert, C. G. Lafaye, L. Puybasset, P. -M. Mertes & F. Claudot (2013). Elective Non-Therapeutic Intensive Care and the Four Principles of Medical Ethics. Journal of Medical Ethics 39 (3):139-142.score: 409.5
    The chronic worldwide lack of organs for transplantation and the continuing improvement of strategies for in situ organ preservation have led to renewed interest in elective non-therapeutic ventilation of potential organ donors. Two types of situation may be eligible for elective intensive care: patients definitely evolving towards brain death and patients suitable as controlled non-heart beating organ donors after life-supporting therapies have been assessed as futile and withdrawn. Assessment of the ethical acceptability and the risks of these strategies is essential. (...)
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  16. Mary Warnock (2008). Easeful Death: Is There a Case for Assisted Dying? Oxford University Press.score: 408.0
    Fundamental principles : the nature of the dispute -- Types of euthanasia -- Psychiatric assisted suicide -- Neonates -- Incompetent adults -- Human life is sacred -- The slippery slope -- Medical views -- Four methods of easing death and their effect on doctors -- Looking further ahead.
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  17. Elisabeth Conradi, Nikola Biller-Andorno, Margarete Boos, Christina Sommer & Claudia Wiesemann (2003). Gender in Medical Ethics: Re-Examining the Conceptual Basis of Empirical Research. Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 6 (1):51-58.score: 408.0
    Conducting empirical research on gender in medical ethics is a challenge from a theoretical as well as a practical point of view. It still has to be clarified how gender aspects can be integrated without sustaining gender stereotypes. The developmental psychologist Carol Gilligan was among the first to question ethics from a gendered point of view. The notion of care introduced by her challenged conventional developmental psychology as well as moral philosophy. Gilligan was criticised, however, because (...)
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  18. John Frederic Kilner, C. Christopher Hook & Diane B. Uustal (eds.) (2002). Cutting-Edge Bioethics: A Christian Exploration of Technologies and Trends. W.B. Eerdmans.score: 408.0
     
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  19. Linda Joy Morrison (2005). Talking Back to Psychiatry: The Psychiatric Consumer/Survivor/Ex-Patient Movement. Routledge.score: 408.0
    Linda Morrison brings the voices and issues of a little-known, complex social movement to the attention of sociologists, mental health professionals, and the general public. The members of this social movement work to gain voice for their own experience, to raise consciousness of injustice and inequality, to expose the darker side of psychiatry, and to promote alternatives for people in emotional distress. Talking Back to Psychiatry explores the movement's history, its complex membership, its strategies and goals, and the (...)
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  20. Joëlle Vailly, Janina Kehr & Jörg Niewöhner (eds.) (2011). De la Vie Biologique à la Vie Sociale: Approches Sociologiques Et Anthropologiques. La Découverte.score: 408.0
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  21. David G. Lygre (1979). Life Manipulation: From Test-Tube Babies to Aging. Walker.score: 402.0
     
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  22. Norman Daniels (2008). Just Health: Meeting Health Needs Fairly. Cambridge University Press.score: 396.0
    In this new book by the award-winning author of Just Healthcare, Norman Daniels develops a comprehensive theory of justice for health that answers three key questions: What is the special moral importance of health? When are health inequalities unjust? How can we meet health needs fairly when we cannot meet them all? The theory has implications for national and global health policy: Can we meet health needs fairly in aging societies? Or protect health in the workplace while respecting individual liberty? (...)
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  23. John Z. Sadler (2005). Values and Psychiatric Diagnosis. Oxford University Press.score: 396.0
    The public, mental health consumers, as well as mental health practitioners wonder about what kinds of values mental health professionals hold, and what kinds of values influence psychiatric diagnosis. Are mental disorders socio-political, practical, or scientific concepts? Is psychiatric diagnosis value-neutral? What role does the fundamental philosophical question "How should I live?" play in mental health care? In his carefully nuanced and exhaustively referenced monograph, psychiatrist and philosopher of psychiatry John Z. Sadler describes the manifold kinds of values and value (...)
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  24. Lorraine Dennerstein & Margret M. Baltes (eds.) (2000). Women's Rights and Bioethics. Unesco.score: 396.0
    This book, based on the Round Table on Bioethics and Women held at UNESCO during the Fourth Session of the International Bioethics Committee (IBC), presents the ...
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  25. Matthias Kettner (ed.) (2009). Wunscherfüllende Medizin: Ärztliche Behandlung Im Dienst von Selbstverwirklichung Und Lebensplanung. Campus.score: 396.0
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  26. Annette Hilt, Isabella Jordan & Frewer Andreas (eds.) (2010). Endlichkeit, Medizin Und Unsterblichkeit: Geschichte, Theorie, Ethik. Steiner.score: 396.0
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  27. Ralf J. Jox (2011). Sterben Lassen: Über Entscheidungen Am Ende des Lebens. Edition Körber-Stiftung.score: 396.0
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  28. Jörg Niewöhner, Janina Kehr & Joëlle Vailly (eds.) (2011). Leben in Gesellschaft: Biomedizin, Politik, Sozialwissenschaften. Transcript.score: 396.0
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  29. F. Regnier & J. -M. Rouzioux (1983). Report From France: Contemporary Aspects of Medical Ethics in France. Journal of Medical Ethics 9 (3):170-174.score: 382.5
    The authors consider four aspects of contemporary medical ethics in France: abortion and contraception; artificial insemination; suicide and euthanasia, and drug trials on healthy human volunteers, and then outline the various ethical codes which apply to French doctors. Many in France who accept technological progress are unwilling or unable to acknowledge the impact upon medical ethics of this progress. The conflict is epitomised by the new role being demanded from the doctor. Where formerly he was (...)
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  30. M. Stacey (1985). Medical Ethics and Medical Practice: A Social Science View. Journal of Medical Ethics 11 (1):14-18.score: 382.5
    This paper argues that two characteristics of social life impinge importantly upon medical attempts to maintain high ethical standards. The first is the tension between the role of ethics in protecting the patient and maintaining the solidarity of the profession. The second derives from the observation that the foundations of contemporary medical ethics were laid at a time of one-to-one doctor-patient relations while nowadays most doctors work in or are associated with large-scale organisations. Records cease (...)
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  31. Steven M. Flipse, Maarten C. A. Sanden & Patricia Osseweijer (2013). The Why and How of Enabling the Integration of Social and Ethical Aspects in Research and Development. Science and Engineering Ethics 19 (3):703-725.score: 375.0
    New and Emerging Science and Technology (NEST) based innovations, e.g. in the field of Life Sciences or Nanotechnology, frequently raise societal and political concerns. To address these concerns NEST researchers are expected to deploy socially responsible R&D practices. This requires researchers to integrate social and ethical aspects (SEAs) in their daily work. Many methods can facilitate such integration. Still, why and how researchers should and could use SEAs remains largely unclear. In this paper we aim to relate motivations (...)
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  32. Steven M. Flipse, Maarten Ca van der Sanden & Patricia Osseweijer (2013). The Why and How of Enabling the Integration of Social and Ethical Aspects in Research and Development. Science and Engineering Ethics 19 (3):703-725.score: 375.0
    New and Emerging Science and Technology (NEST) based innovations, e.g. in the field of Life Sciences or Nanotechnology, frequently raise societal and political concerns. To address these concerns NEST researchers are expected to deploy socially responsible R&D practices. This requires researchers to integrate social and ethical aspects (SEAs) in their daily work. Many methods can facilitate such integration. Still, why and how researchers should and could use SEAs remains largely unclear. In this paper we aim to relate motivations (...)
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  33. Adam Lindgreen, Michael Antioco, David Harness & Remi van der Sloot (2009). Purchasing and Marketing of Social and Environmental Sustainability for High-Tech Medical Equipment. Journal of Business Ethics 85 (2):445 - 462.score: 366.0
    As the functional capabilities of high-tech medical products converge, supplying organizations seek new opportunities to differentiate their offerings. Embracing product sustainability-related differentiators provides just such an opportunity. This study examines the challenge organizations face when attempting to understand how customers perceive environmental and social dimensions of sustainability by exploring and defining both dimensions on the basis of a review of extant literature and focus group research with a leading supplier of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanning equipment. The study (...)
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  34. Horacio Fabrega Jr (1990). An Ethnomedical Perspective of Medical Ethics. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 15 (6):593-625.score: 360.0
    Ethnomedicine is the field that analyzes medical traditions comparatively. An ethnomedical approach is used in the essay to analyze the topic of medical ethics. General properties of medical ethics as realized in different societies are outlined. These pertain to the healer's relations with clients, with other healers, and with the group or society. The conditions of medical practice and the influence of social and political factors that affect them are discussed in relation to (...)
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  35. Michael H. Kottow (1999). Theoretical Aids in Teaching Medical Ethics. Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 2 (3):225-229.score: 348.0
    Medical ethics could be better understood if some basic theoretical aspects of practices in health care are analysed. By discussing the underlying ethical principles that govern medical practice, the student should also become familiar with the notion that medical ethics is much more than the external application of socially accepted moral standards. Professions in general and medicine in particular have internal values that command their moral virtuosity at the same time as their technical excellence. (...)
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  36. Eugenia M. Porto (1990). Social Context and Historical Emergence: The Underlying Dimension of Medical Ethics. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 11 (2).score: 342.0
    I argue that work in medical ethics which attempts to humanize medicine without examining hidden assumptions (about medicine's ontology, explanations, goals, relationships) has the dehumanizing effect of legitimating practices which treat persons as abstractions. After illustrating the need to reexamine the field of medical ethics and the doctor-patient relationship in particular, I use Foucault's work to provide a social, historical framework for discussion. This background begins to demonstrate that doctor-patient relationships cannot be made satisfactory by (...)
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  37. Nancy S. Jecker (1990). Integrating Medical Ethics with Normative Theory: Patient Advocacy and Social Responsibility. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 11 (2).score: 337.5
    It is often assumed that the chief responsibility medical professionals bear is patient care and advocacy. The meeting of other duties, such as ensuring a more just distribution of medical resources and promoting the public good, is not considered a legitimate basis for curtailing or slackening beneficial patient services. It is argued that this assumption is often made without sufficient attention to foundational principles of professional ethics; that once core principles are laid bare this assumption is revealed (...)
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  38. K. Boyd (1984). The Positive Aspects of Medical Ethics Today. Journal of Medical Ethics 10 (3):122-123.score: 337.5
    The author of this comment suggests that some of the important points made by Dr Adrian Rogers are vitiated by a tendency to contrast the worst of modern medical practice with an over-idealised view of the past. The state of medical ethics today, the author suggests, is more hopeful than Dr Rogers allows.
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  39. Oonagh Corrigan (ed.) (2009). The Limits of Consent: A Socio-Ethical Approach to Human Subject Research in Medicine. Oxford University Press.score: 336.0
    Since its inception as an international requirement to protect patients and healthy volunteers taking part in medical research, informed consent has become the primary consideration in research ethics. Despite the ubiquity of consent, however, scholars have begun to question its adequacy for contemporary biomedical research. This book explores this issue, reviewing the application of consent to genetic research, clinical trials, and research involving vulnerable populations. For example, in genetic research, information obtained from an autonomous research participant may have (...)
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  40. J. Mahoney (1975). Ethical Aspects of Donor Consent in Transplantation. Journal of Medical Ethics 1 (2):67-70.score: 336.0
    Two recent events have caused renewed anxiety concerning the ethics of donor transplantation. The first is the report of the British Transplantation Society and the second is the Bill introduced by Mr Tam Dalyell MP (see page 61 of this issue) in which he seeks to establish by law that unless an individual in his life time has expressly contracted out his organs may after death be used for transplantation. Dr Mahoney in this paper therefore examines from the point (...)
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  41. Klaus Hoeyer, Lisa Dahlager & Niels Lynöe (2006). Ethical Conflicts During the Social Study of Clinical Practice: The Need to Reassess the Mutually Challenging Research Ethics Traditions of Social Scientists and Medical Researchers. Clinical Ethics 1 (1):41-45.score: 333.0
    When anthropologists and other social scientists study health services in medical institutions, tensions sometimes arise as a result of the social scientists and health care professionals having different ideas about the ethics of research. In order to resolve this type of conflict and to facilitate mutual learning, we describe two general categories of research ethics framing: those of anthropology and those of medicine. The latter focuses on protection of the individual through the preservation of autonomy (...)
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  42. Stephen E. Lammers & Allen Verhey (eds.) (1998). On Moral Medicine: Theological Perspectives in Medical Ethics. William B. Eerdmans Pub..score: 333.0
    Collecting a wide range of contemporary and classical theological essays dealing with medical ethics, this volume is the finest resource available for engaging ...
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  43. Constantinos Deltas, Helenē Kalokairinou & Sabine Rogge (eds.) (2006). Progress in Science and the Danger of Hubris: Genetics, Transplantation, Stem Cell Research: Proceedings of the First International Conference on Medical Ethics, Nicosia, 24-26 September 2004. [REVIEW] Waxmann.score: 333.0
    Introduction The present volume contains the proceedings of the First International Conference on Medical Ethics which took place in Nicosia, from the 24th ...
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  44. Margaret L. Eaton (2004). Ethics and the Business of Bioscience. Stanford Business Books.score: 332.0
    Businesses that produce bioscience products—gene tests and therapies, pharmaceuticals, vaccines, and medical devices—are regularly confronted with ethical issues concerning these technologies. Conflicts exist between those who support advancements in bioscience and those who fear the consequences of unfettered scientific license. As the debate surrounding bioscience grows, it will be increasingly important for business managers to consider the larger consequences of their work. This groundbreaking book follows industry research, development, and marketing of medical and bioscience products across a variety (...)
     
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  45. C. Blomquist (1975). The Teaching of Medical Ethics in Sweden. Journal of Medical Ethics 1 (2):96-103.score: 324.0
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  46. J. de Boer, G. van Blijderveen, G. van Dijk, H. J. Duivenvoorden & M. Williams (2012). Implementing Structured, Multiprofessional Medical Ethical Decision-Making in a Neonatal Intensive Care Unit. Journal of Medical Ethics 38 (10):596-601.score: 322.5
    Background In neonatal intensive care, a child's death is often preceded by a medical decision. Nurses, social workers and pastors, however, are often excluded from ethical case deliberation. If multiprofessional ethical case deliberations do take place, participants may not always know how to perform to the fullest. Setting A level-IIID neonatal intensive care unit of a paediatric teaching hospital in the Netherlands. Methods Structured multiprofessional medical ethical decision-making (MEDM) was implemented to help overcome problems experienced. Important features (...)
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  47. Francois Berger, Sjef Gevers, Ludwig Siep & Klaus-Michael Weltring (2008). Ethical, Legal and Social Aspects of Brain-Implants Using Nano-Scale Materials and Techniques. Nanoethics 2 (3):241-249.score: 318.0
    Nanotechnology is an important platform technology which will add new features like improved biocompatibility, smaller size, and more sophisticated electronics to neuro-implants improving their therapeutic potential. Especially in view of possible advantages for patients, research and development of nanotechnologically improved neuro implants is a moral obligation. However, the development of brain implants by itself touches many ethical, social and legal issues, which also apply in a specific way to devices enabled or improved by nanotechnology. For researchers developing nanotechnology such (...)
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  48. Joseph B. R. Gaie (2004). The Ethics of Medical Involvement in Capital Punishment: A Philosophical Discussion. Kluwer Academic.score: 315.0
    This book examines the extremely important issue of the consistency of medical involvement in ending lives in medicine, law and war. It uses philosophical theory to show why medical doctors may be involved at different stages of the capital punishment process. The author uses the theories of Emmanuel Kant and John S. Mill, combined with Gerwith's principle of generic consistency, to concretize ethics in capital punishment practice. This book does not discuss the moral justification of capital punishment, (...)
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  49. Chris Beckett (2005). Values & Ethics in Social Work: An Introduction. Sage.score: 315.0
    In social work there is seldom an uncontroversial `right way' of doing things. So how will you deal with the value questions and ethical dilemmas that you will be faced with as a professional social worker? This lively and readable introductory text is designed to equip students with a sound understanding of the principles of values and ethics which no social worker should be without. Bridging the gap between theory and practice, this book successfully explores the (...)
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  50. Nancy Berlinger (2005). After Harm: Medical Error and the Ethics of Forgiveness. Johns Hopkins University Press.score: 315.0
    Medical error is a leading problem of health care in the United States. Each year, more patients die as a result of medical mistakes than are killed by motor vehicle accidents, breast cancer, or AIDS. While most government and regulatory efforts are directed toward reducing and preventing errors, the actions that should follow the injury or death of a patient are still hotly debated. According to Nancy Berlinger, conversations on patient safety are missing several important components: religious voices, (...)
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