Search results for 'Medical ethics committees' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Marek Czarkowski & Krzysztof Różanowski (2009). Polish Research Ethics Committees in the European Union System of Assessing Medical Experiments. Science and Engineering Ethics 15 (2):201-212.score: 531.0
    The Polish equivalents of Research Ethics Committees are Bioethics Committees (BCs). A questionnaire study has been undertaken to determine their situation. The BC is usually comprised of 13 members. Nine of these are doctors and four are non-doctors. In 2006 BCs assessed an average of 27.3 ± 31.7 (range: 0–131) projects of clinical trials and 71.1 ± 139.8 (range: 0–638) projects of other types of medical research. During one BC meeting an average of 10.3 ± 14.7 (...)
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  2. John O. Christensen (1991). Medical Ethics Committees: A Selective Bibliography of Recent References. Vance Bibliographies.score: 450.0
     
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  3. Marcel J. H. Kenter (2009). Regulating Human Participants Protection in Medical Research and the Accreditation of Medical Research Ethics Committees in the Netherlands. Journal of Academic Ethics 7 (1-2):33-43.score: 429.0
    The review system on research with human participants in the Netherlands is characterised as a decentralised controlled and integrated peer review system. It consists of an independent governmental body, the Central Committee on Research Involving Human Subjects (or Central Committee), which regulates the review of research proposals by accredited Medical Research Ethics Committees (MRECs). The legal basis was founded in 1999 with the Medical Research Involving Human Subjects Act. The review system is a decentralised arrangement since (...)
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  4. P. Riis (1993). Medical Ethics in the European Community. Journal of Medical Ethics 19 (1):7-12.score: 429.0
    Increasing European co-operation must take place in many areas, including medical ethics. Against the background of common cultural norms and pluralistic variation within political traditions, religion and lifestyles, Europe will have to converge towards unity within the field of medical ethics. This article examines how such convergence might develop with respect to four major areas: European research ethics committees, democratic health systems, the human genome project and rules for stopping futile treatments.
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  5. Akira Akabayashi, Brian T. Slingsby, Noriko Nagao, Ichiro Kai & Hajime Sato (2007). An Eight-Year Follow-Up National Study of Medical School and General Hospital Ethics Committees in Japan. BMC Medical Ethics 8 (1):1-8.score: 390.0
    Background Ethics committees and their system of research protocol peer-review are currently used worldwide. To ensure an international standard for research ethics and safety, however, data is needed on the quality and function of each nation's ethics committees. The purpose of this study was to describe the characteristics and developments of ethics committees established at medical schools and general hospitals in Japan. Methods This study consisted of four national surveys sent twice over (...)
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  6. S. Guest (1997). Compensation for Subjects of Medical Research: The Moral Rights of Patients and the Power of Research Ethics Committees. Journal of Medical Ethics 23 (3):181-185.score: 390.0
    Awareness of the morally significant distinction between research and innovative therapy reveals serious gaps in the legal provision for compensation in the UK for injured subjects of medical research. Major problems are limitations inherent in negligence actions and a culture that emphasises indemnifying researchers before compensating victims. Medical research morally requires compensation on a no-fault basis even where there is proper consent on the part of the research subject. In particular, for drug research, there is insufficient provision in (...)
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  7. M. Hayry (1998). Ethics Committees, Principles and Consequences. Journal of Medical Ethics 24 (2):81-85.score: 384.0
    When ethics committees evaluate the research proposals submitted to them by biomedical scientists, they can seek guidance from laws and regulations, their own beliefs, values and experiences, and from the theories of philosophers. The starting point of this paper is that philosophers can only be helpful to the members of ethics committees if they take into account in their models both the basic moral intuitions that most of us share and the consequences of people's choices. A (...)
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  8. Linda Farber Post (2007). Handbook for Health Care Ethics Committees. Johns Hopkins University Press.score: 348.0
    The Joint Commission on the Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations (JCAHO) requires as a condition of accreditation that every health care institution -- hospital, nursing home, or home care agency -- have a standing mechanism to address ethical issues. Most organizations have chosen to fulfill this requirement with an interdisciplinary ethics committee. The best of these committees are knowledgeable, creative, and effective resources in their institutions. Many are wellmeaning but lack the information, experience, and skills to negotiate adequately the (...)
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  9. Guy Lebeer (ed.) (2002). Ethical Function in Hospital Ethics Committees. Ios Press.score: 348.0
    IOS Prexs, 2002 Introduction This book is the final project report of the BIOMED II project Ethical Function in Hospital Ethics Committees Commission,-2001 ...
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  10. Akira Akabayashi, Brian Taylor Slingsby, Noriko Nagao, Ichiro Kai & Hajime Sato (2008). A Five Year Follow-Up National Study of Ethics Committees in Medical Organizations in Japan. HEC Forum 20 (1):49-60.score: 348.0
    Compared to institutional and area-based ethics committees, little is known about the structure and activities performed by ethics committees at national medical organizations and societies. This five year follow-up study aimed to determine (1) the creation and function of ethics committees at medical organizations in Japan, and (2) their general strategies to deal with ethical problems. The study sample included the member societies of the Japanese Association of Medical Sciences (n=92 in (...)
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  11. P. J. Lewis (1982). Focus: Current Issues in Medical Ethics: The Drawbacks of Research Ethics Committees. Journal of Medical Ethics 8 (2):61-64.score: 345.0
    Research ethics committees, while in many ways an excellent innovation, do have some drawbacks. This paper examines three of these. The first problem of such committees is that their approval of specific projects in their own institutions acquires intrinsic value. The second problem relates to the possible devolution of responsibility from the investigator to the committee. The committee approves, the investigator feels relieved of some responsibility and things can be done to patients which neither the committee nor (...)
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  12. Eleanor Updale (2009). The Role of Clinical Ethics Committees. Diametros 22:116-123.score: 342.0
    Over the past 15 years or so, Clinical Ethics Committees (CECs) have been established in many healthcare settings in the UK. How do they work, who sits on them, and what do they discuss? How formal should they be? Should their decisions be binding on clinicians, or purely advisory? Should they offer their services to patients and their families too? Are they valuable additions to clinical support, or simply intellectual talking-shops for their members? Should other countries set up (...)
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  13. T. Hope (1999). Empirical Medical Ethics. Journal of Medical Ethics 25 (3):219-220.score: 342.0
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  14. J. Simek, L. Zamykalova & M. Mesanyova (2010). Ethics Committee or Community? Examining the Identity of Czech Ethics Committees in the Period of Transition. Journal of Medical Ethics 36 (9):548-552.score: 339.0
    Reflecting on a three year long exploratory research of ethics committees in the Czech Republic authors discuss the current role and identity of research ethics committees. The research of Czech ethics committees focused on both self-presentation and self-understanding of ECs members, and how other stakeholders (representatives of the pharmaceutical industry) view them. The exploratory research was based on formal and informal communication with the members of the ethics committees. Members of the research (...)
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  15. Hans-Peter Graf (2013). Are the Votes of Ethics Committees in Germany for the Protection of Clinical Study Trial Subjects “Sovereign Acts?”. Science and Engineering Ethics 19 (2):341-354.score: 328.0
    A sudden paradigm shift has resulted in governmental measures that greatly impact the scope in which the ethics committees in Germany can perform their task of providing expert opinions for clinical research. The so-called “revaluation” of the Medical Device Law Deutsches Medizinproduktegesetz—MPG) is, in our opinion, not based on sound political and professional judgment. In accordance with the changed regulations, ethics committees are now seen as being sub-organs of the state medical associations or the (...)
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  16. Ronald E. Cranford & A. Edward Doudera (eds.) (1984). Institutional Ethics Committees and Health Care Decision Making. Health Administration Press.score: 306.0
     
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  17. D. Micah Hester (ed.) (2008). Ethics by Committee: A Textbook on Consultation, Organization, and Education for Hospital Ethics Committees. Rowman & Littlefield Pub..score: 306.0
     
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  18. John F. Monagle & David C. Thomasma (eds.) (1992). Medical Ethics: Policies, Protocols, Guidelines & Programs. Aspen Publishers.score: 306.0
     
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  19. R. E. Ashcroft (2002). Ethics Committees in Central and Eastern Europe: Edited by J Glasa for the Council of Europe. IMEB Foundation and Charis A.S.: Order From the Institute of Medical Ethics and Bioethics Foundation, Limbova 12, 83303 Bratislava, Slovak Republic, J.Glasa@Upkm.Sk, 2001, US$7.00 (Within Europe), US$9 (Elsewhere) (Includes Postage), Pp 266. ISBN 80-88743-40-. [REVIEW] Journal of Medical Ethics 28 (5):334-334.score: 303.0
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  20. Caterina Caminiti, Francesca Diodati, Arianna Gatti, Saverio Santachiara & Sandro Spinsanti (2011). Current Functions of Italian Ethics Committees: A Cross-Sectional Study. Bioethics 25 (4):220-227.score: 297.0
    Background: The rapid pace of progress in medical research, the consequent need for the timely transfer of new knowledge into practice, and the increasing need for ethics support, is making the work of Ethics Committees (ECs) ever more complex and demanding. As a response, ECs in many countries exhibit large variation in number, mandate, organization and member competences. This cross-sectional study aims to give an overview of the different types of activities of Italian ECs and favour (...)
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  21. Dr Martin Tolich & Kate Mary Baldwin (2005). Unequal Protection for Patient Rights: The Divide Between University and Health Ethics Committees. [REVIEW] Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 2 (1):34-40.score: 297.0
    Despite recommendations from the Cartwright Report ethical review by health ethics committees has continued in New Zealand without health practitioners ever having to acknowledge their dual roles as health practitioners researching their own patients. On the other hand, universities explicitly identify doctor/research-patient relations as potentially raising conflict of role issues. This stems from the acknowledgement within the university sector itself that lecturer/research-student relations are fraught with such conflicts. Although similar unequal relationships are seen to exist between health researchers (...)
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  22. Katrina A. Bramstedt (2011). Finding Your Way: Through the Maze of Medical Ethics in Modern Health Care. Hilton Pub..score: 297.0
    Machine generated contents note: Introduction Chapter 1: The basics of ethical decision-making Chapter 2: Hospital ethics committees and clinical ethicists Chapter 3: The settings of health care ethical dilemmas Chapter 4: Advance directives Chapter 5: Do Not Resuscitate orders and "Code Blue" Chapter 6: Non-beneficial medical interventions Chapter 7: Quality of life and treatment burdens Chapter 8: Patient privacy and confidentiality Chapter 9: Refusing medical treatment Chapter 10: Health care at the end of life Chapter 11: (...)
     
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  23. Dr Boleslav Lichterman (2002). Conflict or Harmony? Clinical Research and the Medical Press in Russia. Science and Engineering Ethics 8 (3):383-386.score: 297.0
    The author relates conditions for conducting clinical trials in Russia, current experiences of ethics committees, areas where conflicts of interest can occur regarding publishing the results of clinical trials in medical journals and the state of medical journalism in Russia today.
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  24. Keymanthri Moodley & Landon Myer (2007). Health Research Ethics Committees in South Africa 12 Years Into Democracy. BMC Medical Ethics 8 (1):1-8.score: 294.0
    Background Despite the growth of biomedical research in South Africa, there are few insights into the operation of Research Ethics Committees (RECs) in this setting. We investigated the composition, operations and training needs of health RECs in South Africa against the backdrop of national and international guidelines. Methods The 12 major health RECs in South Africa were surveyed using semi-structured questionnaires that investigated the composition and functions of each REC as well as the operational issues facing committees. (...)
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  25. R. Dal-Re, J. Espada & R. Ortega (1999). Performance of Research Ethics Committees in Spain. A Prospective Study of 100 Applications for Clinical Trial Protocols on Medicines. Journal of Medical Ethics 25 (3):268-273.score: 294.0
    OBJECTIVES: To review the characteristics and performance of research ethics committees in Spain in the evaluation of multicentre clinical trial drug protocols. DESIGN: A prospective study of 100 applications. SETTING: Forty-one committees reviewing clinical trial protocols, involving 50 hospitals in 25 cities. MAIN MEASURES: Protocol-related features, characteristics of research ethics committees and evaluation dynamics. RESULTS: The 100 applications involved 15 protocols (of which 12 were multinational) with 12 drugs. Committees met monthly (except one). They (...)
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  26. G. Kent (1997). The Views of Members of Local Research Ethics Committees, Researchers and Members of the Public Towards the Roles and Functions of LRECs. Journal of Medical Ethics 23 (3):186-190.score: 294.0
    BACKGROUND: It can be argued that the ethical conduct of research involves achieving a balance between the rights and needs of three parties-potential research participants, society, and researchers. Local Research Ethics Committees (LRECs) have a number of roles and functions in the research enterprise, but there have been some indications that LREC members, researchers and the public can have different views about these responsibilities. Any such differences are potential sources of disagreement and misunderstanding. OBJECTIVES: To compare the views (...)
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  27. G. Kent (1999). Responses by Four Local Research Ethics Committees to Submitted Proposals. Journal of Medical Ethics 25 (3):274-277.score: 294.0
    BACKGROUND: There is relatively little research concerning the processes whereby Local Research Ethics Committees discharge their responsibilities towards society, potential participants and investigators. OBJECTIVES: To examine the criteria used by LRECs in arriving at their decisions concerning approval of research protocols through an analysis of letters sent to investigators. DESIGN: Four LRECs each provided copies of 50 letters sent to investigators after their submitted proposals had been considered by the committees. These letters were subjected to a content (...)
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  28. A. H. Ahmed & K. G. Nicholson (1996). Delays and Diversity in the Practice of Local Research Ethics Committees. Journal of Medical Ethics 22 (5):263-266.score: 294.0
    OBJECTIVES: To compare the practices of local research ethics committees and the time they take to obtain ethical approval for a multi-centre study. DESIGN: A retrospective analysis of outcome of applications for a multi-centre study to local research ethics committees. SETTING: Thirty-six local research ethics committees covering 38 district health authorities in England. MAIN MEASURES: Response of chairmen and women, the time required to obtain approval, and questions asked in application forms. RESULTS: We received (...)
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  29. M. E. Redshaw, A. Harris & J. D. Baum (1996). Research Ethics Committee Audit: Differences Between Committees. Journal of Medical Ethics 22 (2):78-82.score: 282.0
    The same research proposal was submitted to 24 district health authority (DHA) research ethics committees in different parts of the country. The objective was to obtain permission for a multi-centre research project. The study of neonatal care in different types of unit (regional, subregional and district), required that four health authorities were approached in each of six widely separated health regions in England. Data were collected and compared concerning aspects of processing, including application forms, information required, timing and (...)
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  30. Dennis John Mazur (2007). Evaluating the Science and Ethics of Research on Humans: A Guide for Irb Members. Johns Hopkins University Press.score: 282.0
    Biomedical research on humans is an important part of medical progress. But, when lives are at risk, safety and ethical practices need to be the top priority. The need for the committees that regulate and oversee such research -- institutional review boards, or IRBs -- is growing. IRB members face difficult decisions every day. Evaluating the Science and Ethics of Research on Humans is a guide for new and veteran members of IRBs that will help them better (...)
     
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  31. Bela Blasszauer (1991). Medical Ethics Committees in Hungary Dr. Bela Blasszauer. HEC Forum 3 (5):277-283.score: 270.0
  32. Mary Beth West & Joan McIver Gibson (1992). Facilitating Medical Ethics Case Review: What Ethics Committees Can Learn From Mediation and Facilitation Techniques. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 1 (01):63-.score: 270.0
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  33. Kenneth M. Boyd, Robert V. Brody, David A. Buehler, Daniel Callahan, Kevin T. FitzGerald, Elizabeth Graham, John Harris, Steve Heilig & Søren Holm (1998). William Andereck, MD, is Chair of the Ethics Committees at California Pacific Medical Center and the Pacific Fertility Center, San Francisco, California. Lori B. Andrews, JD, is Professor of Law at Chicago-Kent College of Law and Senior Scholar at the Center for Clinical Medical Ethics at the University of Chicago, Illinois. [REVIEW] Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 7:117-118.score: 270.0
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  34. Kazumasa Hoshino (1992). The Liaison Society for Ethics Committees of Medical Schools in Japan. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 1 (02):179-.score: 270.0
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  35. A. Nyika, W. Kilama, R. Chilengi, G. Tangwa, P. Tindana, P. Ndebele & J. Ikingura (2009). Composition, Training Needs and Independence of Ethics Review Committees Across Africa: Are the Gate-Keepers Rising to the Emerging Challenges? Journal of Medical Ethics 35 (3):189-193.score: 270.0
    Background: The high disease burden of Africa, the emergence of new diseases and efforts to address the 10/90 gap have led to an unprecedented increase in health research activities in Africa. Consequently, there is an increase in the volume and complexity of protocols that ethics review committees in Africa have to review. Methods: With a grant from the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, the African Malaria Network Trust (AMANET) undertook a survey of 31 ethics review committees (...)
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  36. Richard Toellner (1981). The Historical Preconditions for the Origin of Medical Ethics Committees in West Germany. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 2 (3):275-282.score: 270.0
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  37. D. Anderson-Ford & A. George (2010). Review of the Regulatory and Governance Environment for Medical Research in the UK with a Particular Focus on Clinical Trials. The Academy of Medical Sciences -- Call for Evidence; National Research Ethics Advisors' Panel/Association of Research Ethics Committees Joint Statement May 2010. [REVIEW] Research Ethics 6 (3):108-113.score: 270.0
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  38. Trevor Smith (1999). Ethics in Medical Research: A Handbook of Good Practice. Cambridge University Press.score: 267.0
    This is a comprehensive and practical guide to the ethical issues raised by different kinds of medical research, and is the first such book to be written with the needs of the researcher in mind. Clearly structured and written in a plain and accessible style, the book covers every significant ethical issue likely to be faced by researchers and research ethics committees. The author outlines and clarifies official guidelines, gives practical advice on how to adhere to these, (...)
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  39. Jonathan D. Moreno (1995). Deciding Together: Bioethics and Moral Consensus. Oxford University Press.score: 267.0
    Western society today is less unified by a set of core values than ever before. Undoubtedly, the concept of moral consensus is a difficult one in a liberal, democratic and pluralistic society. But it is imperative to avoid a rigid majoritarianism where sensitive personal values are at stake, as in bioethics. Bioethics has become an influential part of public and professional discussions of health care. It has helped frame issues of moral values and medicine as part of a more general (...)
     
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  40. Stephen Wilkinson (2003). Book Review: Sue Eckstein, Manual for Research Ethics Committees (Centre of Medical Law and Ethics, King's College London). [REVIEW] Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 6 (4):459-460.score: 264.0
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  41. Brian Taylor Slingsby Akira Akabayashi, Ichiro Kai Noriko Nagao & Hajime Sato (2008). A Five Year Follow-Up National Study of Ethics Committees in Medical Organizations in Japan. HEC Forum 20 (1).score: 261.0
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  42. Ronald E. Domen (1995). A Survey of Ethics Committees in National Medical Organizations in the United States. HEC Forum 7 (6):333-338.score: 261.0
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  43. K. S. Saeed (1999). How Physician Executives and Clinicians Perceive Ethical Issues in Saudi Arabian Hospitals. Journal of Medical Ethics 25 (1):51-56.score: 261.0
    OBJECTIVES: To compare the perceptions of physician executives and clinicians regarding ethical issues in Saudi Arabian hospitals and the attributes that might lead to the existence of these ethical issues. DESIGN: Self-completion questionnaire administered from February to July 1997. SETTING: Different health regions in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. PARTICIPANTS: Random sample of 457 physicians (317 clinicians and 140 physician executives) from several hospitals in various regions across the kingdom. RESULTS: There were statistically significant differences in the perceptions of physician (...)
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  44. Akio Sakai (1989). The Present Status of Ethics Committees in Japan's 80 Medical Schools. HEC Forum 1 (4):221-228.score: 261.0
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  45. Takao Saito (1992). Ethics Committees in Japanese Medical Schools. HEC Forum 4 (4):281-7.score: 261.0
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  46. L. Waller (forthcoming). The Role and Function of Institutional Ethics Committees in Medical Research: A Commentary. Proceedings of the 1984 Conference on Bioethics. St Vincent's Hospital Bioethics Centre, Melbourne.score: 261.0
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  47. Y. J. Craig (1996). Patient Decision-Making: Medical Ethics and Mediation. Journal of Medical Ethics 22 (3):164-167.score: 258.0
    A review of medical ethics literature relating to the importance of the participation of patients in decision-making introduces the role of rights-based mediation as a voluntary process now being developed innovatively in America. This is discussed in relation to the theory of communicative ethics and moral personhood. References are then made to the work of medical ethics committees and the role of mediation within these. Finally it is suggested that mediation is part of an (...)
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  48. R. Pedersen, V. Akre & R. Forde (2009). What is Happening During Case Deliberations in Clinical Ethics Committees? A Pilot Study. Journal of Medical Ethics 35 (3):147-152.score: 255.0
    Background: Clinical ethics consultation services have been established in many countries during recent decades. An important task is to discuss concrete clinical cases. However, empirical research observing what is happening during such deliberations is scarce. Objectives: To explore clinical ethics committees’ deliberations and to identify areas for improvement. Design: A pilot study including observations of committees deliberating a paper case, semistructured group interviews, and qualitative analysis of the data. Participants: Nine hospital ethics committees in (...)
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  49. P. Zhou, D. Xue, T. Wang, Z. L. Tang, S. K. Zhang, J. P. Wang, P. P. Mao, Y. Q. Xi, R. Wu & R. Shi (2009). Survey on the Function, Structure and Operation of Hospital Ethics Committees in Shanghai. Journal of Medical Ethics 35 (8):512-516.score: 255.0
    Objective: The objectives of this study are to understand the current functions, structure and operation of hospital ethics committees (HECs) in Shanghai and to facilitate their improvement. Methods: (1) A questionnaire survey, (2) interviews with secretaries and (3) on-site document reviews of HECs in Shanghai were used in the study, which surveyed 33 hospitals. Results: In Shanghai, 57.56% of the surveyed hospitals established HECs from 1998 to 2005. Most HECs used bioethical review of research involving human subjects as (...)
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  50. J. E. Fleetwood, R. M. Arnold & R. J. Baron (1989). Giving Answers or Raising Questions?: The Problematic Role of Institutional Ethics Committees. Journal of Medical Ethics 15 (3):137-142.score: 255.0
    Institutional ethics committees (IECs) are part of a growing phenomenon in the American health care system. Although a major force driving hospitals to establish IECs is the desire to resolve difficult clinical dilemmas in a quick and systematic way, in this paper we argue that such a goal is naive and, to some extent, misguided. We assess the growing trend of these committees, analyse the theoretical assumptions underlying their establishment, and evaluate their strengths and shortcomings. We show (...)
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