Search results for 'Medical innovations Moral and ethical aspects' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Gary Duhon (2008). An Uncomfortable Refusal Pp. 15-15 HTML Version | PDF Version (78k) Subject Headings: Premature Infants -- Medical Care -- Moral and Ethical Aspects. Commentary. [REVIEW] Hastings Center Report 38 (5):pp. 15-16.score: 984.0
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  2. Jane Stein (1978). Making Medical Choices: Who is Responsible? Houghton Mifflin.score: 843.0
     
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  3. Allen E. Buchanan (2011). Beyond Humanity?: The Ethics of Biomedical Enhancement. Oxford University Press.score: 808.0
    In Beyond Humanity a leading philosopher offers a powerful and controversial exploration of urgent ethical issues concerning human enhancement.
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  4. John Frederic Kilner, C. Christopher Hook & Diane B. Uustal (eds.) (2002). Cutting-Edge Bioethics: A Christian Exploration of Technologies and Trends. W.B. Eerdmans.score: 768.0
     
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  5. Fernando Lolas (ed.) (2006). Ética E Innovación Tecnológica. Centro Interdisciplinario de Estudios En Bioética (Cieb), Vicerrectoría de Investigación y Desarrollo, Universidad de Chile.score: 768.0
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  6. Janet Perry (1999). Mad Scientists. Gareth Stevens.score: 768.0
     
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  7. John Harris (1992). Wonderwoman and Superman: The Ethics of Human Biotechnology. Oxford University Press.score: 757.0
    Since the birth of the first test-tube baby, Louise Brown, in 1977, we have seen truly remarkable advances in biotechnology. We can now screen the fetus for Down Syndrome, Spina Bifida, and a wide range of genetic disorders. We can rearrange genes in DNA chains and redirect the evolution of species. We can record an individual's genetic fingerprint. And we can potentially insert genes into human DNA that will produce physical warning signs of cancer, allowing early detection. In fact, biotechnology (...)
     
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  8. Suzanne Shale (2012). Moral Leadership in Medicine: Building Ethical Healthcare Organizations. Cambridge University Press.score: 741.6
    Machine generated contents note: Preface; Acknowledgements; 1. Why medicine needs moral leaders; 2. Creating an organizational narrative; 3. Understanding normative expectations in medical moral leadership; Prologue to chapters four and five; 4. Expressing fiduciary, bureaucratic and collegial propriety; 5. Expressing inquisitorial and restorative propriety; Epilogue to chapters four and five; 6. Understanding organizational moral narrative; 7. Moral leadership for ethical organizations; Appendix 1. How the research was done; Appendix 2. Accountability for clinical performance: individuals (...)
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  9. Robert F. Weir (1989). Abating Treatment with Critically Ill Patients: Ethical and Legal Limits to the Medical Prolongation of Life. Oxford University Press.score: 701.6
    This book offers an in-depth analysis of the wide range of issues surrounding "passive euthanasia" and "allow-to-die" decisions. The author develops a comprehensive conceptual model that is highly useful for assessing and dealing with real-life situations. He presents an informative historical overview, an evaluation of the clinical settings in which treatment abatement takes place, and an insightful discussion of relevant legal aspects. The result is a clearly articulated ethical analysis that is medically realistic, philosophically sound, and legally viable.
     
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  10. Ezekiel J. Emanuel (ed.) (2003). Ethical and Regulatory Aspects of Clinical Research: Readings and Commentary. Johns Hopkins University Press.score: 681.6
    All investigators funded by the National Institutes of Health are now required to receive training about the ethics of clinical research. Based on a course taught by the editors at NIH, Ethical and Regulatory Aspects of Clinical Research is the first book designed to help investigators meet this new requirement. The book begins with the history of human subjects research and guidelines instituted since World War II. It then covers various stages and components of the clinical trial process: (...)
     
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  11. Maurice B. Visscher (1975). Ethical Constraints and Imperatives in Medical Research. Thomas.score: 633.6
     
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  12. Marian Egan (forthcoming). Dr. Klein Moral Aspects of Medicine 3 December 2006 Ethics of Medical Research in Third World Countries. Ethics.score: 594.0
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  13. J. Arlebrink (1997). The Moral Roots of Prenatal Diagnosis. Ethical Aspects of the Early Introduction and Presentation of Prenatal Diagnosis in Sweden. Journal of Medical Ethics 23 (4):260-261.score: 588.0
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  14. Joseph B. R. Gaie (2004). The Ethics of Medical Involvement in Capital Punishment: A Philosophical Discussion. Kluwer Academic.score: 581.6
    This book examines the extremely important issue of the consistency of medical involvement in ending lives in medicine, law and war. It uses philosophical theory to show why medical doctors may be involved at different stages of the capital punishment process. The author uses the theories of Emmanuel Kant and John S. Mill, combined with Gerwith's principle of generic consistency, to concretize ethics in capital punishment practice. This book does not discuss the moral justification of capital punishment, (...)
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  15. B. G. Gazzard (1992). AIDS a Moral Issue -- Ethical, Legal and Social Aspects. Journal of Medical Ethics 18 (1):51-52.score: 564.0
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  16. Trevor Smith (1999). Ethics in Medical Research: A Handbook of Good Practice. Cambridge University Press.score: 561.6
    This is a comprehensive and practical guide to the ethical issues raised by different kinds of medical research, and is the first such book to be written with the needs of the researcher in mind. Clearly structured and written in a plain and accessible style, the book covers every significant ethical issue likely to be faced by researchers and research ethics committees. The author outlines and clarifies official guidelines, gives practical advice on how to adhere to these, (...)
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  17. F. Regnier & J. -M. Rouzioux (1983). Report From France: Contemporary Aspects of Medical Ethics in France. Journal of Medical Ethics 9 (3):170-174.score: 556.0
    The authors consider four aspects of contemporary medical ethics in France: abortion and contraception; artificial insemination; suicide and euthanasia, and drug trials on healthy human volunteers, and then outline the various ethical codes which apply to French doctors. Many in France who accept technological progress are unwilling or unable to acknowledge the impact upon medical ethics of this progress. The conflict is epitomised by the new role being demanded from the doctor. Where formerly he was regarded (...)
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  18. Bertram Bandman (2003). The Moral Development of Health Care Professionals: Rational Decisionmaking in Health Care Ethics. Praeger.score: 537.6
    A central challenge motivates this work: How, if at all, can philosophical ethics help in the moral development of health professionals?
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  19. Nancy Berlinger (2005). After Harm: Medical Error and the Ethics of Forgiveness. Johns Hopkins University Press.score: 537.6
    Medical error is a leading problem of health care in the United States. Each year, more patients die as a result of medical mistakes than are killed by motor vehicle accidents, breast cancer, or AIDS. While most government and regulatory efforts are directed toward reducing and preventing errors, the actions that should follow the injury or death of a patient are still hotly debated. According to Nancy Berlinger, conversations on patient safety are missing several important components: religious voices, (...)
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  20. Constantinos Deltas, Helenē Kalokairinou & Sabine Rogge (eds.) (2006). Progress in Science and the Danger of Hubris: Genetics, Transplantation, Stem Cell Research: Proceedings of the First International Conference on Medical Ethics, Nicosia, 24-26 September 2004. [REVIEW] Waxmann.score: 537.6
    Introduction The present volume contains the proceedings of the First International Conference on Medical Ethics which took place in Nicosia, from the 24th ...
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  21. Frédéric Gilbert & Susan Dodds (2014). Is There a Moral Obligation to Develop Brain Implants Involving NanoBionic Technologies? Ethical Issues for Clinical Trials. Nanoethics 8 (1):49-56.score: 537.6
    In their article published in Nanoethics, “Ethical, Legal and Social Aspects of Brain-Implants Using Nano-Scale Materials and Techniques”, Berger et al. suggest that there may be a prima facie moral obligation to improve neuro implants with nanotechnology given their possible therapeutic advantages for patients [Nanoethics, 2:241–249]. Although we agree with Berger et al. that developments in nanomedicine hold the potential to render brain implant technologies less invasive and to better target neural stimulation to respond to brain impairments (...)
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  22. Robert Baker & Laurence B. McCullough (2007). The Relationship Between Moral Philosophy and Medical Ethics Reconsidered. Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 17 (3):271-276.score: 536.0
    : Medical ethics often is treated as applied ethics, that is, the application of moral philosophy to ethical issues in medicine. In an earlier paper, we examined instances of moral philosophy's influence on medical ethics. We found the applied ethics model inadequate and sketched an alternative model. On this model, practitioners seeking to change morality "appropriate" concepts and theory fragments from moral philosophy to valorize and justify their innovations. Goldilocks-like, five commentators tasted our (...)
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  23. Wenzel Geissler & Catherine Molyneux (eds.) (2011). Evidence, Ethos and Experiment: The Anthropology and History of Medical Research in Africa. Berghahn Books.score: 519.4
    "This is an extremely interesting and innovative collection with unusual empirical richness, with ethical and epistemological discussions cutting across ...
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  24. Jürgen Boomgaarden, Pekka Louhiala & Urban Wiesing (eds.) (2003). Issues in Medical Research Ethics. Berghahn Books.score: 517.6
    Introduction TEMPE (Teaching Ethics: Material for Practitioner Education) is a two-year research project (2000-2002) funded by the European Commission ...
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  25. Robert Laurence Barry (1989). Medical Ethics: Essays on Abortion and Euthanasia. P. Lang.score: 513.6
  26. Margaret Monahan Hogan & David Solomon (eds.) (2007/2008). Medical Ethics at Notre Dame: The J. Philip Clarke Family Lectures, 1988-1999. [South Bend, Ind.?]The Notre Dame Center for Ethics and Culture.score: 513.6
     
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  27. Margaret Monahan Hogan & David Solomon (eds.) (2007/2008). Medical Ethics at Notre Dame: The J. [South Bend, Ind.?]The Notre Dame Center for Ethics and Culture.score: 513.6
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  28. John F. Monagle & David C. Thomasma (eds.) (1992). Medical Ethics: Policies, Protocols, Guidelines & Programs. Aspen Publishers.score: 513.6
     
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  29. Mary Briody Mahowald (2006). Bioethics and Women: Across the Life Span. Oxford University Press.score: 501.6
    All persons, while different from one another, have the same value: this is the author's relatively uncontroversial starting point. Her end point is not uncontroversial: an ideal of justice as human flourishing, based on each person's unique set of capabilities. Because the book's focus is women's health care, gender justice, a necessary component of justice, is central to examination of the issues. Classical pragmatists and feminist standpoint theorists are enlisted in support of a strategy by which gender justice is promoted. (...)
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  30. Sonja Olin-Lauritzen & Lars-Christer Hydén (eds.) (2007). Medical Technologies and the Life World: The Social Construction of Normality. Routledge.score: 501.6
    Although the use of new health technologies in healthcare and medicine is generally seen as beneficial, there has been little analysis of the impact of such technologies on people's lives and understandings of health and illness. This book explores how new technologies not only provide hope for cure and well-being, but also introduce new ethical dilemmas and raise questions about the "natural" body. Focusing on the ways new health technologies intervene into our lives and affect our ideas about normalcy, (...)
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  31. Samuel Gorovitz (1991/1993). Drawing the Line: Life, Death, and Ethical Choices in an American Hospital. Temple University Press.score: 501.6
    In 1985, philosopher Samuel Gorovitz spent seven weeks at Boston's Beth Israel, one of the nation's premier teaching hospitals, where he was given free run as "Authorized Snoop and Irritant-at-Large." In Drawing the Line, he provides an intense, disturbing, and insightful account of his observations during those seven weeks. Gorovitz guides us through an operating room and intensive care units, and takes us to meetings where surgeons discuss the mishaps of the preceding week, where internists map out their approaches to (...)
     
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  32. M. W. Ross (1989). Psychosocial Ethical Aspects of AIDS. Journal of Medical Ethics 15 (2):74-81.score: 484.8
    The psychosocial morbidity associated with HIV infection and responses to such infection may exceed morbidity associated with medical sequelae of such infection. This paper argues that negative judgements on those with HIV infection or in groups associated with such infection will cause avoidable psychological and social distress. Moral judgements made regarding HIV infection may also harm the common good by promoting conditions which may increase the spread of HIV infection. This paper examines these two lines of argument with (...)
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  33. Oonagh Corrigan (ed.) (2009). The Limits of Consent: A Socio-Ethical Approach to Human Subject Research in Medicine. Oxford University Press.score: 477.6
    Since its inception as an international requirement to protect patients and healthy volunteers taking part in medical research, informed consent has become the primary consideration in research ethics. Despite the ubiquity of consent, however, scholars have begun to question its adequacy for contemporary biomedical research. This book explores this issue, reviewing the application of consent to genetic research, clinical trials, and research involving vulnerable populations. For example, in genetic research, information obtained from an autonomous research participant may have significant (...)
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  34. John Hart (1997). Ethics and Technology: Innovation and Transformation in Community Contexts. Pilgrim Press.score: 473.6
     
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  35. Ruth Macklin (1999). Against Relativism: Cultural Diversity and the Search for Ethical Universals in Medicine. Oxford University Press.score: 465.6
    This book provides an analysis of the debate surrounding cultural diversity, and attempts to reconcile the seemingly opposing views of "ethical imperialism," the belief that each individual is entitled to fundamental human rights, and cultural relativism, the belief that ethics must be relative to particular cultures and societies. The author examines the role of cultural tradition, often used as a defense against critical ethical judgments. Key issues in health and medicine are explored in the context of cultural diversity: (...)
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  36. Guy Lebeer (ed.) (2002). Ethical Function in Hospital Ethics Committees. Ios Press.score: 465.6
    IOS Prexs, 2002 Introduction This book is the final project report of the BIOMED II project Ethical Function in Hospital Ethics Committees Commission,-2001 ...
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  37. Laura Jeanine Morris Stark (2012). Behind Closed Doors: Irbs and the Making of Ethical Research. The University of Chicago Press.score: 465.6
    IRBs in action -- Everyone's an expert? Warrants for expertise -- Local precedents -- Documents and deliberations: an anticipatory perspective -- Setting IRBs in motion in Cold War America -- An ethics of place -- The many forms of consent -- Deflecting responsibility -- Conclusion: the making of ethical research.
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  38. Jane Barrett (2006). Ethics in Clinical Research. Icr Pub..score: 461.6
    Chapter One: Introduction “The ethical basis of all [medical] research is that information gained from one patient's experience should, where feasible, ...
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  39. Allen E. Buchanan (1989). Deciding for Others: The Ethics of Surrogate Decisionmaking. Cambridge University Press.score: 461.6
    This book is the most comprehensive treatment available of one of the most urgent--and yet in some respects most neglected--problems in bioethics: decisionmaking for incompetents. Part I develops a general theory for making treatment and care decisions for patients who are not competent to decide for themselves. It provides an in-depth analysis of competence, articulates and defends a coherent set of principles to specify suitable surrogate decisionmakers and to guide their choices, examines the value of advance directives, and investigates the (...)
     
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  40. Dennis John Mazur (2007). Evaluating the Science and Ethics of Research on Humans: A Guide for Irb Members. Johns Hopkins University Press.score: 461.6
    Biomedical research on humans is an important part of medical progress. But, when lives are at risk, safety and ethical practices need to be the top priority. The need for the committees that regulate and oversee such research -- institutional review boards, or IRBs -- is growing. IRB members face difficult decisions every day. Evaluating the Science and Ethics of Research on Humans is a guide for new and veteran members of IRBs that will help them better understand (...)
     
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  41. David N. Weisstub (ed.) (1998). Research on Human Subjects: Ethics, Law, and Social Policy. Pergamon.score: 461.6
    There have been serious controversies in the latter part of the 20th century about the roles and functions of scientific and medical research. In whose interests are medical and biomedical experiments conducted and what are the ethical implications of experimentation on subjects unable to give competent consent? From the decades following the Second World War and calls for the global banning of medical research to the cautious return to the notion that in controlled circumstances, medical (...)
     
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  42. Stavroula A. Papadodima, Chara A. Spiliopoulou & Emmanouil I. Sakelliadis (2008). Medical Confidentiality: Legal and Ethical Aspects in Greece. Bioethics 22 (7):397-405.score: 459.0
    Respect for confidentiality is firmly established in codes of ethics and law. Medical care and the patients' trust depend on the ability of the doctors to maintain confidentiality. Without a guarantee of confidentiality, many patients would want to avoid seeking medical assistance The principle of confidentiality, however, is not absolute and may be overridden by public interests. On some occasions (birth, death, infectious disease) there is a legal obligation on the part of the doctor to disclose but only (...)
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  43. Moshe David Tendler (ed.) (1975). Medical Ethics: A Compendium of Jewish Moral, Ethical, and Religious Principles in Medical Practice. Committee on Religious Affairs, Federation of Jewish Philanthropies of New York.score: 459.0
     
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  44. Claudio Marcello Tamburrini & Torbjörn Tännsjö (eds.) (2005). Genetic Technology and Sport: Ethical Questions. Routledge.score: 457.6
    For elite athletes seeking a winning advantage, manipulation of their own genetic code has become a realistic possibility. In Genetic Technology and Sport, experts from sports science, genetics, philosophy, ethics, and international sports administration describe the potential applications of the new technology and debate the questions surrounding its use.
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  45. William J. Ellos (1990). Ethical Practice in Clinical Medicine. Routledge.score: 457.6
    This textbook develops the issue of ethics to a philosophical level complex enough to be applicable to students of philosophy and applied ethics courses. It is the first book to address clinical problems from a classical perspective. This title available in eBook format. Click here for more information . Visit our eBookstore at: www.ebookstore.tandf.co.uk.
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  46. M. J. Newton (1986). Moral Dilemmas in Surgical Training: Intent and the Case for Ethical Ambiguity. Journal of Medical Ethics 12 (4):207-211.score: 456.0
    It is often assumed that the central problem in a medical ethics issue is determining which course of action is morally correct. There are some aspects of ethical issues that will yield to such analysis. However, at the core of important medical moral problems is an irreducible dilemma in which all possible courses of action, including inaction, seem ethically unsatisfactory. When facing these issues ethical behaviour depends upon an individual's understanding and acceptance of this (...)
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  47. Julius Sim (1997). Ethical Decision-Making in Therapy Practice. Butterworth-Heinemann.score: 453.6
    The text is extensively referenced, but practical in its approach, giving real life examples and cases based on therapeutic practice.
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  48. Bartha Maria Knoppers (ed.) (2003). Populations and Genetics: Legal and Socio-Ethical Perspectives. Martinus Nijhoff.score: 453.6
    This book of selected papers covers population research and banking as well as accompanying confidentiality, and governance concerns.
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  49. Susan B. Rubin (1998). When Doctors Say No: The Battleground of Medical Futility. Indiana University Press.score: 453.6
    Who should decide? In When Doctors Say No, philosopher and bioethicist Rubin examines this controversial issue.
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  50. Margaret A. Somerville (2000). The Ethical Canary: Science, Society, and the Human Spirit. Viking.score: 453.6
    Along the way, she calls upon us to recognize the mysteries that lie at the heart of our lives and the metaphysical reality that gives meaning to life.The ...
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