Search results for 'Medical policy Social aspects' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Social Policy (1999). Human Needs, Consumption, and Social Policy. Economics and Philosophy 15:187-208.score: 1470.0
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  2. David N. Weisstub (ed.) (1998). Research on Human Subjects: Ethics, Law, and Social Policy. Pergamon.score: 516.0
    There have been serious controversies in the latter part of the 20th century about the roles and functions of scientific and medical research. In whose interests are medical and biomedical experiments conducted and what are the ethical implications of experimentation on subjects unable to give competent consent? From the decades following the Second World War and calls for the global banning of medical research to the cautious return to the notion that in controlled circumstances, medical research (...)
     
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  3. Alan Cribb (2005). Health and the Good Society: Setting Healthcare Ethics in Social Context. Oxford University Press.score: 456.0
    What is health policy for? In Health and the Good Society, Alan Cribb addresses this question in a way that cuts across disciplinary boundaries. His core argument is that biomedical ethics should draw upon public health values and ethics; specifically, he argues that everybody has some share of responsibility for health, including a responsibility for promoting greater health equality. In the process, Cribb argues for a major rethink of the whole project of health education.
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  4. S. M. Rajah (1975). Medical Experimentation: Personal Integrity and Social Policy. Journal of Medical Ethics 1 (3):155-155.score: 414.0
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  5. Leon M. Hermans, N. El-Masry & T. M. Sadek (2002). Participative Water Management: Social and Ecological Aspects: Linking Actors and Models for Water Policy Development in Egypt: Analyzing Actors and Their Options. Knowledge Technology and Policy 14 (4):57-74.score: 414.0
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  6. Norman Daniels (2008). Just Health: Meeting Health Needs Fairly. Cambridge University Press.score: 408.0
    In this new book by the award-winning author of Just Healthcare, Norman Daniels develops a comprehensive theory of justice for health that answers three key questions: What is the special moral importance of health? When are health inequalities unjust? How can we meet health needs fairly when we cannot meet them all? The theory has implications for national and global health policy: Can we meet health needs fairly in aging societies? Or protect health in the workplace while respecting individual (...)
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  7. Jonathan D. Moreno (2011). The Body Politic: The Battle Over Science in America. Bellevue Literary Press.score: 408.0
    Who owns science? -- Science in America -- Thepolitics of heredity -- Dangerous ideas -- The stem Cell debate -- Valuing humanity -- Crossing lines -- In defense of "progress".
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  8. Richard Stein (2007). Review of Mark A. Rothstein (Ed.), Genetics and Life Insurance, Medical Underwriting and Social Policy. Cambridge, MA: The MIT Press, 2004. 293 Pp. $34.00, Hardcover. [REVIEW] American Journal of Bioethics 7 (4):88-89.score: 405.0
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  9. M. H. Kottow (1999). In Defence of Medical Ethics. Journal of Medical Ethics 25 (4):340-343.score: 396.0
    A number of recent publications by the philosopher David Seedhouse are discussed. Although medicine is an eminently ethical enterprise, the technical and ethical aspects of health care practices can be distinguished, therefore justifying the existence of medical ethics and its teaching as a specific part of every medical curriculum. The goal of teaching medical ethics is to make health care practitioners aware of the essential ethical aspects of their work. Furthermore, the contention that rational bioethics (...)
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  10. Adam Lindgreen, Michael Antioco, David Harness & Remi van der Sloot (2009). Purchasing and Marketing of Social and Environmental Sustainability for High-Tech Medical Equipment. Journal of Business Ethics 85 (2):445 - 462.score: 337.5
    As the functional capabilities of high-tech medical products converge, supplying organizations seek new opportunities to differentiate their offerings. Embracing product sustainability-related differentiators provides just such an opportunity. This study examines the challenge organizations face when attempting to understand how customers perceive environmental and social dimensions of sustainability by exploring and defining both dimensions on the basis of a review of extant literature and focus group research with a leading supplier of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanning equipment. The study (...)
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  11. David Greaves (1998). What Are Heart Attacks? Rethinking Some Aspects of Medical Knowledge. Medicine, Healthcare and Philosophy 1 (2):133-141.score: 333.0
    There has been a modern epidemic of heart attacks in the western world, and this paper is concerned with this ‘new’ medical condition and how it arose. Two competing theories are commonly proposed, relating either to conventional accounts of medical science, or to social construction. Whilst recognising that aspects of both theories have some validity, it is claimed that neither is wholly adequate. This issue has particular relevance for heart attacks and is explored in some detail, (...)
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  12. David Harper & Ewen Speed (2012). Uncovering Recovery: The Resistible Rise of Recovery and Resilience. Studies in Social Justice 6 (1):9-26.score: 300.0
    Discourses of recovery and resilience have risen to positions of dominance in the mental health field. Models of recovery and resilience enjoy purchase, in both policy and practice, across a range of settings from self-described psychiatric survivors through to mental health charities through to statutory mental health service providers. Despite this ubiquity, there is confusion about what recovery means. In this article we problematize notions of recovery and resilience, and consider what, if anything, should be recovered from these concepts. (...)
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  13. D. Greaves (1997). Changing Priorities in Residential Medical and Social Services. Journal of Medical Ethics 23 (2):77-81.score: 297.0
    During the past thirty years a high proportion of all long stay hospital beds have been closed. The responsibility for those who would have occupied those beds previously has to a large extent been transferred from health to social services departments, or to family, voluntary and private care. The overall effect has been to prioritize acute medical care, and to expose the public provision and funding of long term residential care, whether medical or social, to the (...)
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  14. Francois Berger, Sjef Gevers, Ludwig Siep & Klaus-Michael Weltring (2008). Ethical, Legal and Social Aspects of Brain-Implants Using Nano-Scale Materials and Techniques. Nanoethics 2 (3):241-249.score: 288.0
    Nanotechnology is an important platform technology which will add new features like improved biocompatibility, smaller size, and more sophisticated electronics to neuro-implants improving their therapeutic potential. Especially in view of possible advantages for patients, research and development of nanotechnologically improved neuro implants is a moral obligation. However, the development of brain implants by itself touches many ethical, social and legal issues, which also apply in a specific way to devices enabled or improved by nanotechnology. For researchers developing nanotechnology such (...)
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  15. Sonja Olin-Lauritzen & Lars-Christer Hydén (eds.) (2007). Medical Technologies and the Life World: The Social Construction of Normality. Routledge.score: 288.0
    Although the use of new health technologies in healthcare and medicine is generally seen as beneficial, there has been little analysis of the impact of such technologies on people's lives and understandings of health and illness. This book explores how new technologies not only provide hope for cure and well-being, but also introduce new ethical dilemmas and raise questions about the "natural" body. Focusing on the ways new health technologies intervene into our lives and affect our ideas about normalcy, the (...)
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  16. Nathalie Burnay (2010). Older Workers in Changing Social Policy Patterns. Studies in Social Justice 3 (2):155-171.score: 288.0
    Normal 0 false false false EN-CA X-NONE X-NONE Compared to other European countries, the employment rate of older workers in Belgium is rather low. This paper argues that one of the most relevant factors underlying the problems of this low employment rate in Belgium is the social policies directed at older workers. Indeed, when unemployment became a widespread phenomenon in the1970s and 80s, early-retirement schemes were designed to alleviate the financial implications on an aging workforce. The government encouraged anyone (...)
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  17. Hajime Sato, Akira Akabayashi & Ichiro Kai (2006). Public, Experts, and Acceptance of Advanced Medical Technologies: The Case of Organ Transplant and Gene Therapy in Japan. [REVIEW] Health Care Analysis 14 (4):203-214.score: 288.0
    In 1997, after long social debates, the Japanese government enacted a law on organ transplantation from brain-dead bodies. Since 1993, on gene therapy, administrative agencies have issued a series of guidelines. This study seeks to elucidate when people became aware of the issues and when they formed their opinions on organ transplant and gene therapy. At the same time, it aims to examine at which point in time experts, those in university ethical committees and in academic societies, consider these (...)
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  18. Linda Joy Morrison (2005). Talking Back to Psychiatry: The Psychiatric Consumer/Survivor/Ex-Patient Movement. Routledge.score: 276.0
    Linda Morrison brings the voices and issues of a little-known, complex social movement to the attention of sociologists, mental health professionals, and the general public. The members of this social movement work to gain voice for their own experience, to raise consciousness of injustice and inequality, to expose the darker side of psychiatry, and to promote alternatives for people in emotional distress. Talking Back to Psychiatry explores the movement's history, its complex membership, its strategies and goals, and the (...)
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  19. S. Shkedi-Rafid & Y. Hashiloni-Dolev (2012). Egg Freezing for Non-Medical Uses: The Lack of a Relational Approach to Autonomy in the New Israeli Policy and in Academic Discussion. Journal of Medical Ethics 38 (3):154-157.score: 274.5
    Recently, the Israel National Bioethics Council (INBC) issued recommendations permitting egg freezing to prevent both disease- and age-related fertility decline. The INBC report forms the basis of Israel's new policy, being one of the first countries to regulate and authorise egg freezing for what it considers to be non-medical (ie, social) uses. The ethical discussion in the INBC report is reviewed and compared with the scant ethical discourse in the academic literature on egg freezing as a means (...)
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  20. Robert Willmott (2002). Education Policy and Realist Social Theory: Primary Teachers, Child-Centred Philosophy, and the New Managerialism. Routledge.score: 261.0
    Over the last two decades, the framework of economic competitiveness has become the defining aim of education. This book thoughtfully and persuasively argues against this new vision of education.
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  21. Robert S. Wigton (1996). Social Judgement Theory and Medical Judgement. Thinking and Reasoning 2 (2 & 3):175 – 190.score: 261.0
    Social judgement theory is particularly well suited to the study of medical judgements. Medical judgements characteristically involve decision making under uncertainty with inevitable error and an abundance of fallible cues. In medicine, as in other areas, SJT research has found wide variation among decision makers in their judgements and in the weighting of clinical information. Strategies inferred from case vignettes differ from physicians' self-described strategies and from the weights suggested by experts. These observations parallel recent findings of (...)
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  22. Stevan Dedijer, Jan Annerstedt & Andrew Jamison (eds.) (1988). From Research Policy to Social Intelligence: Essays for Stevan Dedijer. Macmillan Press.score: 261.0
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  23. Robert Baker (ed.) (1999). The American Medical Ethics Revolution: How the Ama's Code of Ethics has Transformed Physicians' Relationships to Patients, Professionals, and Society. Johns Hopkins University Press.score: 256.5
    The American Medical Association enacted its Code of Ethics in 1847, the first such national codification. In this volume, a distinguished group of experts from the fields of medicine, bioethics, and history of medicine reflect on the development of medical ethics in the United States, using historical analyses as a springboard for discussions of the problems of the present, including what the editors call "a sense of moral crisis precipitated by the shift from a system of fee-for-service medicine (...)
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  24. William M. Sage (2010). Will Embryonic Stem Cells Change Health Policy? Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 38 (2):342-351.score: 252.0
    Embryonic stem cells are actively debated in political and public policy arenas. However, the connections between stem cell innovation and overall health care policy are seldom elucidated. As with many controversial aspects of medical care, the stem cell debate bridges to a variety of social conversations beyond abortion. Some issues, such as translational medicine, commercialization, patient and public safety, health care spending, physician practice, and access to insurance and health care services, are core health (...) concerns. Other issues, such as economic development, technologic progress, fiscal politics, and tort reform, are only indirectly related to the health care system but are frequently seen through a health care lens. These connections will help determine whether the stem cell debate reaches a resolution, and what that resolution might be. (shrink)
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  25. John N. Hawkins & W. James Jacob (eds.) (2011). Policy Debates in Comparative, International, and Development Education. Palgrave Macmillan.score: 252.0
    Machine generated contents note: PART I: OVERVIEW OF KEY INTERNATIONAL EDUCATION POLICY DEBATES * PART II: THE ROLE OF POLICY IN SOCIAL JUSTICE DEBATES * PART III: POLICY DEBATES IN INTERNATIONAL HIGHER EDUCATION * PART IV: EDUCATION POLICY DEBATES WITH LASTING CONSEQUENCES.
     
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  26. Thomas S. Huddle (2013). The Limits of Social Justice as an Aspect of Medical Professionalism. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 38 (4):369-387.score: 243.0
    Contemporary accounts of medical ethics and professionalism emphasize the importance of social justice as an ideal for physicians. This ideal is often specified as a commitment to attaining the universal availability of some level of health care, if not of other elements of a “decent minimum” standard of living. I observe that physicians, in general, have not accepted the importance of social justice for professional ethics, and I further argue that social justice does not belong among (...)
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  27. Victor R. Fuchs (2011). Who Shall Live?: Health, Economics, and Social Choice. World Scientific.score: 225.0
    Problems and choices -- Who shall live? -- The physician : the captain of the team -- The hospital : the house of hope -- Drugs : the key to modern medicine -- Paying for medical care.
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  28. C. Barry Hoffmaster (ed.) (2001). Bioethics in Social Context. Temple University Press.score: 220.5
    Yet these forces are largely ignored by a professional bioethics that concentrates on the theoretical justification of decisions.The original essays in this ...
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  29. Jonathan D. Linton & Steven T. Walsh (2012). Introduction to the Field of Nanotechnology Ethics and Policy. Journal of Business Ethics 109 (4):547-549.score: 220.5
    Nanotechnologies and nanoscience have generated an unprecedented global research and development race involving dozens of countries. The understanding of associated environmental, ethical, and societal implications lags far behind the science and technology. Consequently, it is critical to consider both what is known and what is unknown to offer a kernel that future work can be added to. The challenges presented by nanotechnologies are discussed. Some initial solutions such as self-regulation and borrowing techniques and tools from other fields are accompanied by (...)
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  30. Dario Sacchini, Andrea Virdis, Pietro Refolo, Maddalena Pennacchini & Ignacio Carrasco de Paula (2009). Health Technology Assessment (HTA): Ethical Aspects. [REVIEW] Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 12 (4):453-457.score: 220.0
    “HTA is a multidisciplinary process that summarizes information about the medical, social, economic and ethical issues related to the use of a health technology in a systematic, transparent, unbiased, robust manner. Its aim is to inform the formulation of safe, effective, health policies that are patient focused, and seek to achieve best value” (EUnetHTA 2007). Even though the assessment of ethical aspects of a health technology is listed as one of the objectives of a HTA process, in (...)
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  31. Madison Powers & Ruth Faden (2008). Social Justice: The Moral Foundations of Public Health and Health Policy. OUP USA.score: 216.0
    In bioethics, discussions of justice have tended to focus on questions of fairness in access to health care: is there a right to medical treatment, and how should priorities be set when medical resources are scarce. But health care is only one of many factors that determine the extent to which people live healthy lives, and fairness is not the only consideration in determining whether a health policy is just. In this pathbreaking book, senior bioethicists Powers and (...)
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  32. Jacquineau Azétsop & Stuart Rennie (2010). Principlism, Medical Individualism, and Health Promotion in Resource-Poor Countries: Can Autonomy-Based Bioethics Promote Social Justice and Population Health? [REVIEW] Philosophy, Ethics, and Humanities in Medicine 5 (1):1.score: 216.0
    Through its adoption of the biomedical model of disease which promotes medical individualism and its reliance on the individual-based anthropology, mainstream bioethics has predominantly focused on respect for autonomy in the clinical setting and respect for person in the research site, emphasizing self-determination and freedom of choice. However, the emphasis on the individual has often led to moral vacuum, exaggeration of human agency, and a thin (liberal?) conception of justice. Applied to resource-poor countries and communities within developed countries, autonomy-based (...)
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  33. Bradford H. Gray (1981). Human Subjects in Medical Experimentation: A Sociological Study of the Conduct and Regulation of Clinical Research. R.E. Krieger Pub. Co..score: 216.0
     
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  34. Heta Häyry (1998). Individual Liberty and Medical Control. Ashgate Pub..score: 216.0
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  35. Melanie Phillips (1985). Doctors' Dilemmas: Medical Ethics and Contemporary Science. Methuen.score: 216.0
     
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  36. Carlos Pérez Soto (2009). Sobre la Condición Social de la Psicología. Lom Ediciones.score: 216.0
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  37. Douglas Torgerson (1980). Industrialization and Assessment: Social Impact Assessment as a Social Phenomenon. President's Advisory Committee on Northern Studies, York University, with the Cooperation of the Northern Social Research Division, Dept. Of Indian and Northern Affairs.score: 216.0
     
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  38. B. G. Gazzard (1992). AIDS a Moral Issue -- Ethical, Legal and Social Aspects. Journal of Medical Ethics 18 (1):51-52.score: 211.5
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  39. Tony Lawson (1997). Economics and Reality. Routledge.score: 207.0
    There is an increasingly widespread belief, both within and outside the discipline, that modern economics is irrelevant to the understanding of the real world. Economics and Reality traces this irrelevance to the failure of economists to match their methods with their subject, showing that formal, mathematical models are unsuitable to the social realities economists purport to address. Tony Lawson examines the various ways in which mainstream economics is rooted in positivist philosophy and examines the problems this causes. It focuses (...)
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  40. Tom Regan & Donald VanDeVeer (eds.) (1982). And Justice for All: New Introductory Essays in Ethics and Public Policy. Rowman and Littlefield.score: 207.0
  41. Luc Fransen (2013). The Embeddedness of Responsible Business Practice: Exploring the Interaction Between National-Institutional Environments and Corporate Social Responsibility. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 115 (2):213-227.score: 198.0
    Academic literature recognizes that firms in different countries deal with corporate social responsibility (CSR) in different ways. Because of this, analysts presume that variations in national-institutional arrangements affect CSR practices. Literature, however, lacks specificity in determining, first, what parts of national political-economic configurations actually affect CSR practices; second, the precise aspects of CSR affected by national-institutional variables; third, how causal mechanisms between national-institutional framework variables and aspects of CSR practices work. Because of this the literature is not (...)
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  42. David C. Thomasma (1990). Euthanasia: Toward an Ethical Social Policy. Continuum.score: 198.0
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  43. Jorge Arturo Chaves (2002). Economic Democracy, Social Dialogue, and Ethical Analysis: Theory and Practice. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 39 (1/2):153 - 159.score: 198.0
    The purpose of this article is to present in a summarized form a new approach to the ethical analysis of economic policies and to illustrate its importance with a reference to recent experiences of social dialogue in Costa Rica. A general view of the Latin American scenario is presented, with the belief that some of the main problems there observed call for a type of analysis like the one here proposed. In the second place, a brief characterization of this (...)
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  44. Simon Btesh (ed.) (1972). Recent Progress in Biology and Medicine, its Social and Ethical Implications: Proceedings of a Round Table Conference on Science Policy and Biomedical Research, Unesco House, Paris, 4-6 September, 1972 = les Récents Progrès De La Biologie Et De La Médecine Et Leur Portée Sociale Et Éthique: Comptes Rendus Du Colloque Sur La Politique Scientifique Et La Recherche Biomédicale, Maison De L'unesco, Paris, 4-6 Septembre, 1972. [REVIEW] Council for International Organizations of Medical Sciences.score: 198.0
     
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  45. Sayantani DasGupta, Alice Fornari, Kamini Geer, Louisa Hahn, Vanita Kumar, Hyun Joon Lee, Susan Rubin & Marji Gold (2006). Medical Education for Social Justice: Paulo Freire Revisited. [REVIEW] Journal of Medical Humanities 27 (4):245-251.score: 198.0
    Although social justice is an integral component of medical professionalism, there is little discussion in medical education about how to teach it to future physicians. Using adult learning theory and the work of Brazilian educator Paulo Freire, medical educators can teach a socially-conscious professionalism through educational content and teaching strategies. Such teaching can model non-hierarchical relationships to learners, which can translate to their clinical interactions with patients. Freirian teaching can additionally foster professionalism in both teachers and (...)
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  46. Rosamond Rhodes, Leslie Francis & Anita Silvers (eds.) (2007). The Blackwell Guide to Medical Ethics. Blackwell Pub..score: 198.0
    The Blackwell Guide to Medical Ethics is a guide to the complex literature written on the increasingly dense topic of ethics in relation to the new technologies of medicine. Examines the key ethical issues and debates which have resulted from the rapid advances in biomedical technology Brings together the leading scholars from a wide range of disciplines, including philosophy, medicine, theology and law, to discuss these issues Tackles such topics as ending life, patient choice, selling body parts, resourcing and (...)
     
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  47. Norman Daniels (1985). Just Health Care. Cambridge University Press.score: 193.5
    How should medical services be distributed within society? Who should pay for them? Is it right that large amounts should be spent on sophisticated new technology and expensive operations, or would the resources be better employed in, for instance, less costly preventive measures? These and others are the questions addreses in this book. Norman Daniels examines some of the dilemmas thrown up by conflicting demands for medical attention, and goes on to advance a theory of justice in the (...)
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  48. Nicholas Maxwell (2009). Are Universities Undergoing an Intellectual Revolution?,. Oxford Magazine (290):13-16.score: 192.0
    For over 30 years I have argued, in and out of print that, for both intellectual and humanitarian reasons, we urgently need a revolution in the aims and methods of academic inquiry. Instead of giving priority to the search for knowledge, academia needs to devote itself to seeking and promoting wisdom by rational means, wisdom being the capacity to realize what is of value in life, for oneself and others. Wisdom thus includes knowledge but much else besides. A basic task (...)
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  49. Ayodele S. Jegede (2009). Culture and Genetic Screening in Africa. Developing World Bioethics 9 (3):128-137.score: 192.0
    Africa is a continent in transition amidst a revival of cultural practices. Over previous years the continent was robbed of the benefits of medical advances by unfounded cultural practices surrounding its cultural heritage. In a fast moving field like genetic screening, discussions of social and policy aspects frequently need to take place at an early stage to avoid the dilemma encountered by Western medicine. This paper, examines the potential challenges to genetic screening in Africa. It discusses (...)
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  50. Janet Atkinson-Grosjean & Cory Fairley (2009). Moral Economies in Science: From Ideal to Pragmatic. Minerva 47 (2):147-170.score: 192.0
    In the following pages we discuss three historical cases of moral economies in science: Drosophila genetics, late twentieth century American astronomy, and collaborations between American drug companies and medical scientists in the interwar years. An examination of the most striking differences and similarities between these examples, and the conflicts internal to them, reveals constitutive features of moral economies, and the ways in which they are formed, negotiated, and altered. We critically evaluate these three examples through the filters of rational (...)
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