Search results for 'Medical policy Social aspects' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  6
    Social Policy (1999). Human Needs, Consumption, and Social Policy. Economics and Philosophy 15:187-208.
    From its early origins to the present, the development of mainstream economic theory has taken a direction which has excluded the analysis of human needs as a basis for social policy. The problems associated with this orientation are increasingly recognized both by economists and non-economists. As Sen (1985) points out, it is indeed strange for a discipline concerned with the well-being of people to neglect the question of needs. Currently, some writers such as Doyal and Gough (1991), post-Keynesian (...)
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  2.  5
    Bogdan Stancu, Georgel Rednic, Nicolae Ovidiu Grad, Ion Aurel Mironiuc & Claudia Diana Gherman (2016). Medical, Social and Christian Aspects in Patients with Major Lower Limb Amputations. Journal for the Study of Religions and Ideologies 15 (43):82-101.
    Lower limb major amputations are both life-saving procedures and life-changing events. Individual responses to limb loss are varied and complex, some individuals experience functional, psychological and social dysfunction, many others adjust and function well. Some patients refuse amputation for religious and/or cultural reasons. One of the greatest difficulties for a person undergoing amputation surgery is overcoming the psychological stigma that society associates with the loss of a limb. Persons who have undergone amputations are often viewed as incomplete individuals. The (...)
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  3. Nicolae Morar & Natalia Washington (2016). Implicit Cognition and Gifts: How Does Social Psychology Help Us Think Differently About Medical Practice? Hastings Center Report 46 (3):33-43.
    This article takes the following two assumptions for granted: first, that gifts influence physicians and, second, that the influences gifts have on physicians may be harmful for patients. These assumptions are common in the applied ethics literature, and they prompt an obvious practical question, namely, what is the best way to mitigate the negative effects? We examine the negative effects of gift giving in depth, considering how the influence occurs, and we assert that the ethical debate surrounding gift-giving practices must (...)
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  4. Norman Daniels (2008). Just Health: Meeting Health Needs Fairly. Cambridge University Press.
    In this new book by the award-winning author of Just Healthcare, Norman Daniels develops a comprehensive theory of justice for health that answers three key questions: What is the special moral importance of health? When are health inequalities unjust? How can we meet health needs fairly when we cannot meet them all? The theory has implications for national and global health policy: Can we meet health needs fairly in aging societies? Or protect health in the workplace while respecting individual (...)
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  5.  15
    Nicolae Morar & Natalia Washington (2016). Implicit Cognition and Gifts: How Does Social Psychology Help Us Think Differently About Medical Practice? Hastings Center Report 46 (3):33-43.
    This article takes the following two assumptions for granted: first, that gifts influence physicians and, second, that the influences gifts have on physicians may be harmful for patients. These assumptions are common in the applied ethics literature, and they prompt an obvious practical question, namely, what is the best way to mitigate the negative effects? We examine the negative effects of gift giving in depth, considering how the influence occurs, and we assert that the ethical debate surrounding gift-giving practices must (...)
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  6. David N. Weisstub (ed.) (1998). Research on Human Subjects: Ethics, Law, and Social Policy. Pergamon.
    There have been serious controversies in the latter part of the 20th century about the roles and functions of scientific and medical research. In whose interests are medical and biomedical experiments conducted and what are the ethical implications of experimentation on subjects unable to give competent consent? From the decades following the Second World War and calls for the global banning of medical research to the cautious return to the notion that in controlled circumstances, medical research (...)
     
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  7. Charles Fried (1974). Medical Experimentation Personal Integrity and Social Policy. Monograph Collection (Matt - Pseudo).
     
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  8.  76
    Alan Cribb (2005). Health and the Good Society: Setting Healthcare Ethics in Social Context. Oxford University Press.
    What is health policy for? In Health and the Good Society, Alan Cribb addresses this question in a way that cuts across disciplinary boundaries. His core argument is that biomedical ethics should draw upon public health values and ethics; specifically, he argues that everybody has some share of responsibility for health, including a responsibility for promoting greater health equality. In the process, Cribb argues for a major rethink of the whole project of health education.
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  9.  2
    S. M. Rajah (1975). Medical Experimentation: Personal Integrity and Social Policy. Journal of Medical Ethics 1 (3):155-155.
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  10. Leon M. Hermans, N. El-Masry & T. M. Sadek (2002). Participative Water Management: Social and Ecological Aspects: Linking Actors and Models for Water Policy Development in Egypt: Analyzing Actors and Their Options. Knowledge, Technology & Policy 14 (4):57-74.
     
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  11. Jonathan D. Moreno (2011). The Body Politic: The Battle Over Science in America. Bellevue Literary Press.
    Who owns science? -- Science in America -- Thepolitics of heredity -- Dangerous ideas -- The stem Cell debate -- Valuing humanity -- Crossing lines -- In defense of "progress".
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  12.  1
    Richard Stein (2007). Review of Mark A. Rothstein (Ed.), Genetics and Life Insurance, Medical Underwriting and Social Policy. Cambridge, MA: The MIT Press, 2004. 293 Pp. $34.00, Hardcover. [REVIEW] American Journal of Bioethics 7 (4):88-89.
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  13. Ronald D. Pasquariello (1985). Tax Justice: Social and Moral Aspects of American Tax Policy. Upa.
    To find more information on Rowman & Littlefield titles, please visit us at www.rowmanlittlefield.com.
     
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  14.  16
    M. H. Kottow (1999). In Defence of Medical Ethics. Journal of Medical Ethics 25 (4):340-343.
    A number of recent publications by the philosopher David Seedhouse are discussed. Although medicine is an eminently ethical enterprise, the technical and ethical aspects of health care practices can be distinguished, therefore justifying the existence of medical ethics and its teaching as a specific part of every medical curriculum. The goal of teaching medical ethics is to make health care practitioners aware of the essential ethical aspects of their work. Furthermore, the contention that rational bioethics (...)
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  15.  6
    Jessica Smith Rolston, Skylar Huzyk Zilliox, Corinne Packard, Carl Mitcham & Brian Zaharatos (2014). Nanoethics and Policy Education: A Case Study of Social Science Coursework and Student Engagement with Emerging Technologies. NanoEthics 8 (3):217-225.
    The article analyzes the integration of a module on nanotechnology, ethics, and policy into a required second-year social science course at a technological university. It investigates not simply the effectiveness of student learning about the technical aspects of nanotechnology but about how issues explored in an interdisciplinary social science course might influence student opinions about the potential of nanotechnology to benefit the developing world. The authors find a correlation between student opinions about the risks and benefits (...)
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  16.  19
    Adam Lindgreen, Michael Antioco, David Harness & Remi van der Sloot (2009). Purchasing and Marketing of Social and Environmental Sustainability for High-Tech Medical Equipment. Journal of Business Ethics 85 (2):445 - 462.
    As the functional capabilities of high-tech medical products converge, supplying organizations seek new opportunities to differentiate their offerings. Embracing product sustainability-related differentiators provides just such an opportunity. This study examines the challenge organizations face when attempting to understand how customers perceive environmental and social dimensions of sustainability by exploring and defining both dimensions on the basis of a review of extant literature and focus group research with a leading supplier of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanning equipment. The study (...)
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  17.  6
    David Greaves (1998). What Are Heart Attacks? Rethinking Some Aspects of Medical Knowledge. Medicine, Healthcare and Philosophy 1 (2):133-141.
    There has been a modern epidemic of heart attacks in the western world, and this paper is concerned with this ‘new’ medical condition and how it arose. Two competing theories are commonly proposed, relating either to conventional accounts of medical science, or to social construction. Whilst recognising that aspects of both theories have some validity, it is claimed that neither is wholly adequate. This issue has particular relevance for heart attacks and is explored in some detail, (...)
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  18.  90
    D. Greaves (1997). Changing Priorities in Residential Medical and Social Services. Journal of Medical Ethics 23 (2):77-81.
    During the past thirty years a high proportion of all long stay hospital beds have been closed. The responsibility for those who would have occupied those beds previously has to a large extent been transferred from health to social services departments, or to family, voluntary and private care. The overall effect has been to prioritize acute medical care, and to expose the public provision and funding of long term residential care, whether medical or social, to the (...)
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  19.  4
    David Harper & Ewen Speed (2012). Uncovering Recovery: The Resistible Rise of Recovery and Resilience. Studies in Social Justice 6 (1):9-26.
    Discourses of recovery and resilience have risen to positions of dominance in the mental health field. Models of recovery and resilience enjoy purchase, in both policy and practice, across a range of settings from self-described psychiatric survivors through to mental health charities through to statutory mental health service providers. Despite this ubiquity, there is confusion about what recovery means. In this article we problematize notions of recovery and resilience, and consider what, if anything, should be recovered from these concepts. (...)
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  20.  78
    Francois Berger, Sjef Gevers, Ludwig Siep & Klaus-Michael Weltring (2008). Ethical, Legal and Social Aspects of Brain-Implants Using Nano-Scale Materials and Techniques. NanoEthics 2 (3):241-249.
    Nanotechnology is an important platform technology which will add new features like improved biocompatibility, smaller size, and more sophisticated electronics to neuro-implants improving their therapeutic potential. Especially in view of possible advantages for patients, research and development of nanotechnologically improved neuro implants is a moral obligation. However, the development of brain implants by itself touches many ethical, social and legal issues, which also apply in a specific way to devices enabled or improved by nanotechnology. For researchers developing nanotechnology such (...)
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  21.  2
    Irma Niurka Falcón Fariñas, Aylín Nordelo Valdivia, Odalys Escalante Padrón & Ana C. Campal Espinosa (2016). Social aspects of the application of the Heberprot-P in the Angiology service at Manuel Ascunce Domenech Hospital. Humanidades Médicas 16 (1):98-114.
    En la actualidad Cuba desarrolla un Programa de Atención Integral al Paciente con Úlcera de Pie Diabético mediante el uso del Heberprot-P, esencial para disminuir la amputación y la discapacidad. El trabajo tiene el objetivo de realizar un diagnóstico sobre la aplicación del Heberprot-P en el Servicio de Angiología del Hospital Provincial Universitario Manuel Ascunce Domenech de Camagüey. Se realizaron encuestas a pacientes para identificar necesidades sentidas relacionadas con el tratamiento y para las actitudes manifiestas, y se hicieron entrevistas al (...)
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  22.  4
    Hajime Sato, Akira Akabayashi & Ichiro Kai (2006). Public, Experts, and Acceptance of Advanced Medical Technologies: The Case of Organ Transplant and Gene Therapy in Japan. [REVIEW] Health Care Analysis 14 (4):203-214.
    In 1997, after long social debates, the Japanese government enacted a law on organ transplantation from brain-dead bodies. Since 1993, on gene therapy, administrative agencies have issued a series of guidelines. This study seeks to elucidate when people became aware of the issues and when they formed their opinions on organ transplant and gene therapy. At the same time, it aims to examine at which point in time experts, those in university ethical committees and in academic societies, consider these (...)
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  23.  3
    Nathalie Burnay (2010). Older Workers in Changing Social Policy Patterns. Studies in Social Justice 3 (2):155-171.
    Normal 0 false false false EN-CA X-NONE X-NONE Compared to other European countries, the employment rate of older workers in Belgium is rather low. This paper argues that one of the most relevant factors underlying the problems of this low employment rate in Belgium is the social policies directed at older workers. Indeed, when unemployment became a widespread phenomenon in the1970s and 80s, early-retirement schemes were designed to alleviate the financial implications on an aging workforce. The government encouraged anyone (...)
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  24.  10
    Sonja Olin-Lauritzen & Lars-Christer Hydén (eds.) (2007). Medical Technologies and the Life World: The Social Construction of Normality. Routledge.
    Although the use of new health technologies in healthcare and medicine is generally seen as beneficial, there has been little analysis of the impact of such technologies on people's lives and understandings of health and illness. This book explores how new technologies not only provide hope for cure and well-being, but also introduce new ethical dilemmas and raise questions about the "natural" body. Focusing on the ways new health technologies intervene into our lives and affect our ideas about normalcy, the (...)
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  25. Linda Joy Morrison (2005). Talking Back to Psychiatry: The Psychiatric Consumer/Survivor/Ex-Patient Movement. Routledge.
    Linda Morrison brings the voices and issues of a little-known, complex social movement to the attention of sociologists, mental health professionals, and the general public. The members of this social movement work to gain voice for their own experience, to raise consciousness of injustice and inequality, to expose the darker side of psychiatry, and to promote alternatives for people in emotional distress. Talking Back to Psychiatry explores the movement's history, its complex membership, its strategies and goals, and the (...)
     
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  26.  6
    S. Shkedi-Rafid & Y. Hashiloni-Dolev (2012). Egg Freezing for Non-Medical Uses: The Lack of a Relational Approach to Autonomy in the New Israeli Policy and in Academic Discussion. Journal of Medical Ethics 38 (3):154-157.
    Recently, the Israel National Bioethics Council (INBC) issued recommendations permitting egg freezing to prevent both disease- and age-related fertility decline. The INBC report forms the basis of Israel's new policy, being one of the first countries to regulate and authorise egg freezing for what it considers to be non-medical (ie, social) uses. The ethical discussion in the INBC report is reviewed and compared with the scant ethical discourse in the academic literature on egg freezing as a means (...)
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  27.  5
    Sara M. Bergstresser & Erick Castellanos (2015). Feeding Versus Artificial Nutrition and Hydration: At the Boundaries of Medical Intervention and Social Interaction. Ijfab: International Journal of Feminist Approaches to Bioethics 8 (2):204-225.
    In this article, we examine the emergence of a concept of medical feeding that emphasizes artificiality and medical technology. We discuss how this concept has been created in specific contrast to the daily provision of food and water; medical definitions retain clear disjunctures with cultural and religious beliefs surrounding food, gendered aspects of eating and feeding, and the everyday practices of social and family life in the United States. We begin with an examination of the (...)
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  28.  43
    Robert Baker (ed.) (1999). The American Medical Ethics Revolution: How the Ama's Code of Ethics has Transformed Physicians' Relationships to Patients, Professionals, and Society. Johns Hopkins University Press.
    The American Medical Association enacted its Code of Ethics in 1847, the first such national codification. In this volume, a distinguished group of experts from the fields of medicine, bioethics, and history of medicine reflect on the development of medical ethics in the United States, using historical analyses as a springboard for discussions of the problems of the present, including what the editors call "a sense of moral crisis precipitated by the shift from a system of fee-for-service medicine (...)
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  29.  14
    Robert S. Wigton (1996). Social Judgement Theory and Medical Judgement. Thinking and Reasoning 2 (2 & 3):175 – 190.
    Social judgement theory is particularly well suited to the study of medical judgements. Medical judgements characteristically involve decision making under uncertainty with inevitable error and an abundance of fallible cues. In medicine, as in other areas, SJT research has found wide variation among decision makers in their judgements and in the weighting of clinical information. Strategies inferred from case vignettes differ from physicians' self-described strategies and from the weights suggested by experts. These observations parallel recent findings of (...)
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  30. Stevan Dedijer, Jan Annerstedt & Andrew Jamison (eds.) (1988). From Research Policy to Social Intelligence: Essays for Stevan Dedijer. Macmillan Press.
     
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  31. Raymond Tallis & Royal College of Physicians of London (1998). Increasing Longevity Medical, Social and Political Implications.
     
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  32.  29
    Robert Willmott (2002). Education Policy and Realist Social Theory: Primary Teachers, Child-Centred Philosophy, and the New Managerialism. Routledge.
    Over the last two decades, the framework of economic competitiveness has become the defining aim of education. This book thoughtfully and persuasively argues against this new vision of education.
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  33.  17
    William M. Sage (2010). Will Embryonic Stem Cells Change Health Policy? Journal of Law, Medicine & Ethics 38 (2):342-351.
    Embryonic stem cells are actively debated in political and public policy arenas. However, the connections between stem cell innovation and overall health care policy are seldom elucidated. As with many controversial aspects of medical care, the stem cell debate bridges to a variety of social conversations beyond abortion. Some issues, such as translational medicine, commercialization, patient and public safety, health care spending, physician practice, and access to insurance and health care services, are core health (...) concerns. Other issues, such as economic development, technologic progress, fiscal politics, and tort reform, are only indirectly related to the health care system but are frequently seen through a health care lens. These connections will help determine whether the stem cell debate reaches a resolution, and what that resolution might be. (shrink)
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  34.  55
    Madison Powers & Ruth Faden (2008). Social Justice: The Moral Foundations of Public Health and Health Policy. OUP Usa.
    In bioethics, discussions of justice have tended to focus on questions of fairness in access to health care: is there a right to medical treatment, and how should priorities be set when medical resources are scarce. But health care is only one of many factors that determine the extent to which people live healthy lives, and fairness is not the only consideration in determining whether a health policy is just. In this pathbreaking book, senior bioethicists Powers and (...)
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  35. John N. Hawkins & W. James Jacob (eds.) (2011). Policy Debates in Comparative, International, and Development Education. Palgrave Macmillan.
    Machine generated contents note: PART I: OVERVIEW OF KEY INTERNATIONAL EDUCATION POLICY DEBATES * PART II: THE ROLE OF POLICY IN SOCIAL JUSTICE DEBATES * PART III: POLICY DEBATES IN INTERNATIONAL HIGHER EDUCATION * PART IV: EDUCATION POLICY DEBATES WITH LASTING CONSEQUENCES.
     
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  36.  24
    Victor R. Fuchs (2011). Who Shall Live?: Health, Economics, and Social Choice. World Scientific.
    Problems and choices -- Who shall live? -- The physician : the captain of the team -- The hospital : the house of hope -- Drugs : the key to modern medicine -- Paying for medical care.
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  37.  3
    B. E. Gibson, R. E. G. Upshur, N. L. Young & P. McKeever (2007). Disability, Technology, and Place: Social and Ethical Implications of Long-Term Dependency on Medical Devices. Ethics, Policy and Environment 10 (1):7-28.
    Medical technologies and assistive devices such as ventilators and power wheelchairs are designed to sustain life and/or improve functionality but they can also contribute to stigmatization and social exclusion. In this paper, drawing from a study of ten men with Duchenne muscular dystrophy, we explore the complex social processes that mediate the lives of persons who are dependent on multiple medical and assistive technologies. In doing so we consider the embodied and emplaced nature of disability and (...)
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  38.  2
    Bennett Foddy (2013). Medical, Religious and Social Reasons for and Against an Ancient Rite. Journal of Medical Ethics 39 (7):415-415.
    This month's issue of the Journal of Medical Ethics is a special issue devoted entirely to the ethics of infant male circumcision—an elective surgical practice that is currently performed on around a third of the world's male population.1The last time the Journal ran a symposium on this issue was in 2004, and there has been relatively scant discussion of the practice in the ethical literature since then. Three events that took place in the past year have brought the ethics (...)
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  39.  1
    C. Cowley (2006). Polemic: Five Proposals for a Medical School Admission Policy. Journal of Medical Ethics 32 (8):491-494.
    Five proposals for admitting better applicants into medical school are discussed in this article: An A level in a humanity or social science would be required, to supplement—not replace—the stringent science requirement. This would ensure that successful candidates would be better “primed” for the medical curriculum. Extra points in the applicant’s initial screening would be awarded for an A level in English literature. There would be a minimum age of 23 for applicants, although a prior degree would (...)
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  40.  59
    Tony Lawson (1997). Economics and Reality. Routledge.
    There is an increasingly widespread belief, both within and outside the discipline, that modern economics is irrelevant to the understanding of the real world. Economics and Reality traces this irrelevance to the failure of economists to match their methods with their subject, showing that formal, mathematical models are unsuitable to the social realities economists purport to address. Tony Lawson examines the various ways in which mainstream economics is rooted in positivist philosophy and examines the problems this causes. It focuses (...)
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  41.  1
    Jonathan D. Linton & Steven T. Walsh (2012). Introduction to the Field of Nanotechnology Ethics and Policy. Journal of Business Ethics 109 (4):547-549.
    Nanotechnologies and nanoscience have generated an unprecedented global research and development race involving dozens of countries. The understanding of associated environmental, ethical, and societal implications lags far behind the science and technology. Consequently, it is critical to consider both what is known and what is unknown to offer a kernel that future work can be added to. The challenges presented by nanotechnologies are discussed. Some initial solutions such as self-regulation and borrowing techniques and tools from other fields are accompanied by (...)
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  42.  5
    C. Barry Hoffmaster (ed.) (2001). Bioethics in Social Context. Temple University Press.
    Yet these forces are largely ignored by a professional bioethics that concentrates on the theoretical justification of decisions.The original essays in this ...
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  43.  37
    Jacquineau Azétsop & Stuart Rennie (2010). Principlism, Medical Individualism, and Health Promotion in Resource-Poor Countries: Can Autonomy-Based Bioethics Promote Social Justice and Population Health? [REVIEW] Philosophy, Ethics, and Humanities in Medicine 5 (1):1.
    Through its adoption of the biomedical model of disease which promotes medical individualism and its reliance on the individual-based anthropology, mainstream bioethics has predominantly focused on respect for autonomy in the clinical setting and respect for person in the research site, emphasizing self-determination and freedom of choice. However, the emphasis on the individual has often led to moral vacuum, exaggeration of human agency, and a thin (liberal?) conception of justice. Applied to resource-poor countries and communities within developed countries, autonomy-based (...)
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  44.  4
    Geoffrey M. Lairumbi, Michael Parker, Raymond Fitzpatrick & English C. Mike (2011). Stakeholders Understanding of the Concept of Benefit Sharing in Health Research in Kenya: A Qualitative Study. BMC Medical Ethics 12 (1):20.
    BackgroundThe concept of benefit sharing to enhance the social value of global health research in resource poor settings is now a key strategy for addressing moral issues of relevance to individuals, communities and host countries in resource poor settings when they participate in international collaborative health research.The influence of benefit sharing framework on the conduct of collaborative health research is for instance evidenced by the number of publications and research ethics guidelines that require prior engagement between stakeholders to determine (...)
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  45. Bradford H. Gray (1981). Human Subjects in Medical Experimentation: A Sociological Study of the Conduct and Regulation of Clinical Research. R.E. Krieger Pub. Co..
     
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  46. Melanie Phillips (1985). Doctors' Dilemmas: Medical Ethics and Contemporary Science. Methuen.
     
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  47. Heta Häyry (1998). Individual Liberty and Medical Control. Ashgate Pub..
     
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  48. Carlos Pérez Soto (2009). Sobre la Condición Social de la Psicología. Lom Ediciones.
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  49. Douglas Torgerson (1980). Industrialization and Assessment: Social Impact Assessment as a Social Phenomenon. President's Advisory Committee on Northern Studies, York University, with the Cooperation of the Northern Social Research Division, Dept. Of Indian and Northern Affairs.
     
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  50. Jaana Eigi (2013). Knowing Things in Common. Acta Baltica Historiae Et Philosophiae Scientiarum 1 (2):26-37.
    In her analysis of the politics of biotechnology, Sheila Jasanoff argued that modern democracy cannot be understood without an analysis of the ways knowledge is created and used in society. s he suggested calling these ways to “know things in common” civic epistemologies. Jasanoff thus approached knowledge as fundamentally social. t he focus on the social nature of knowledge allows drawing parallels with some developments in philosophy of science. In the first part of the paper, I juxtapose Jasanoff’s (...)
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