Search results for 'Medicine History' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  80
    Anders Ottosson (2011). The Manipulated History of Manipulations of Spines and Joints? Rethinking Orthopaedic Medicine Through the 19th Century Discourse of European Mechanical Medicine. Medicine Studies 3 (2):83-116.
    More than one single professional group deals with therapeutic manipulations of the spine and the joints. Osteopaths, Chiropractors, Naprapaths, Physical Therapists (and a contingent Physicians) all share this interest. Each profession is also very clear about where its bulk of knowledge stems from. The disciplines that are reckoned as the oldest are from the USA. A number of “inventors” are to be found, all without a formal university degree in Medicine. Andrew Taylor Still (1828–1917) came up with his system (...)
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  2. Kurt Fleischhauer (2006). Goals of Medicine in the Course of History and Today: A Study in the History and Philosophy of Medicine. Distributed by Almqvist & Wiksell International.
     
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  3. Louis Alvin Turley (1935). The History of the Philosophy of Medicine. Norman, University of Oklahoma Press.
  4.  8
    David Cantor (2004). Book Review: On Second Thought and Other Essays in the History of Medicine and Science. [REVIEW] Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 25 (2):157-164.
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  5.  26
    Frances Garrett (2009). The Alchemy of Accomplishing Medicine ( Sman Sgrub ): Situating the Yuthok Heart Essence ( G.Yu Thog Snying Thig ) in Literature and History. [REVIEW] Journal of Indian Philosophy 37 (3):207-230.
    This essay examines historical and contemporary connections between Buddhist and medical traditions through a study of the Accomplishing Medicine ( sman sgrub ) practice and the Yuthok Heart Essence ( G.yu thog snying thig ) anthology. Accomplishing Medicine is an esoteric Buddhist yogic and contemplative exercise focused on several levels of “alchemical” transformation. The article will trace the acquisition of this practice from India by Tibetan medical figures and its assimilation into medical practice. It will propose that this (...)
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  6.  2
    Tjaart W. Schillhorn van Veen (1998). One Medicine: The Dynamic Relationship Between Animal and Human Medicine in History and at Present. [REVIEW] Agriculture and Human Values 15 (2):115-120.
    The relation and collaboration of human and animal medicine had its ups and downs throughout history. The interaction between these two disciplines has been especially fruitful in the broad areas of patho-physiology and of epidemiology. An exploration of the interaction between the two disciplines, using historical and contemporary examples in comparative medicine, zoonoses, zooprophylaxis, and human-animal bond, reveals that a better understanding of animal and human disease, as well as societal changes such as interest in non-conventional (...), are leading to a broader concept of one medicine that includes animal and human medicine as well as social and other sciences. (shrink)
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  7.  1
    D. M. Levin & G. F. Solomon (1990). The Discursive Formation of the Body in the History of Medicine. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 15 (5):515-537.
    The principal argument of the present paper is that the human body is as much a reflective formation of multiple discourses as it is an effect of natural and environmental processes. This paper examines the implications of this argument, and suggests that recognizing the body in this light can be illuminating, not only for our conception of the body, but also for our understanding of medicine. Since medicine is itself a discursive formation, a science with both a (...), and a future, it is argued that much can be learned by reflecting on the progression of models, or “paradigm-shifts,”, in terms of which modern medicine has articulated the human body that figures at the heart of its discourse. Four historical periods of medicine will be considered, each one governed by its own distinctive paradigm. It is argued, finally, that, with the emergence of behavioural medicine, and, more particularly, psychoneuroimmunology, a new discursive formation in medicine, one can see a new conceptualization of the human body beginning to take shape; and that this new figure of the body makes it possible for the very first time to conceive the construction of testable hypotheses regarding correlations between the objective body of science and the phenomenological body of experienced meaning. (shrink)
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  8.  5
    Laurie Zoloth (1999). The Best Laid Plans: Resistant Community and the Intrepid Vision in the History of Managed Care Medicine. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 24 (5):461 – 491.
    In the move to critique managed care, the essential principles that first made it a reasonable alternative to fee-for-service medicine can easily be lost. Careful reflection on the history of early grassroots movements that created managed care, and on selected textual narratives of the founders of the managed care organizations at their inception, offers us insight into which of the critical premises and goals of that effort might be reclaimed as we analyze the current managed care environment.
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  9.  4
    Simone Mammola (2013). Does the History of Medicine Begin Where the History of Philosophy Ends? An Example of Interdisciplinarity in the Early Modern Era. History of European Ideas 40 (4):1-17.
    A popular saying attributed to Aristotle states that ‘medicine begins where philosophy ends’—but this principle does not seem entirely valid for the late Middle Ages and the Renaissance, when medicine and philosophy were considered to be integral parts of the same branch of knowledge. For this reason, although today medicine and philosophy are clearly distinct disciplines, historians of ideas cannot study them entirely separately. Indeed, since the early modern era was a period of profound revision of knowledge, (...)
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  10.  10
    George F. Solomon (1990). The Discursive Formation of the Body in the History of Medicine. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 15 (5):515-537.
    The principal argument of the present paper is that the human body is as much a reflective formation of multiple discourses as it is an effect of natural and environmental processes. This paper examines the implications of this argument, and suggests that recognizing the body in this light can be illuminating, not only for our conception of the body, but also for our understanding of medicine. Since medicine is itself a discursive formation, a science with both a (...), and a future, it is argued that much can be learned by reflecting on the progression of models, or "paradigm-shifts,", in terms of which modern medicine has articulated the human body that figures at the heart of its discourse. Four historical periods of medicine will be considered, each one governed by its own distinctive paradigm. It is argued, finally, that, with the emergence of behavioural medicine, and, more particularly, psychoneuroimmunology, a new discursive formation in medicine, one can see a new conceptualization of the human body beginning to take shape; and that this new figure of the body makes it possible for the very first time to conceive the construction of testable hypotheses regarding correlations between the objective body of science and the phenomenological body of experienced meaning. Keywords: body of experienced meaning, discursive formation, immunocompetence, objective body, psychoneuro-immunology CiteULike Connotea Del.icio.us What's this? (shrink)
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  11.  4
    P. L. Entralgo (1996). From Galen to Magnetic Resonance: History of Medicine in Latin America. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 21 (6):571-591.
    Spanish influence in the New World was particularly acute in the areas of medicine and medical education. From the time of Columbus forward prominent medical experts journeyed to Latin America establishing medical schools and research centers. This essay chronicles the history of Latin America with a strong focus on the physicians and scientists who brought modern scientific medicine, as it wag then known in Western Europe, to the Americas.
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  12.  0
    Nancy Siraisi (2012). Medicine, 1450–1620, and the History of Science. Isis: A Journal of the History of Science 103:491-514.
    History of science and history of medicine are today largely organized as distinct disciplines, though ones widely recognized as interrelated. Attempts to evaluate the extent and nature of their relation have reached varying conclusions, depending in part on the historical period under consideration. This essay examines some characteristics of European medicine from the fifteenth to the early seventeenth century and considers their relevance for the history of science. Attention is given to the range of interests (...)
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  13.  0
    P. B. Wood & J. V. Golinski (1981). Collections VIII: Library and Archive Resources in the History of Science and Medicine at the University of Leeds. British Journal for the History of Science 14 (3):263-281.
    Although the University of Leeds has attained something of a reputation for the quality of its scholarship in the history of science, few historians are aware of the impressive collection of early scientific and medical books and manuscripts to be found in the University libraries. In order to make the library resources more widely known, we embarked on a systematic survey of the contents of the main historical collections. We wanted not only to give a general impression of the (...)
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  14.  16
    David Oldroyd (2011). Mineralogy, Chemistry, Botany, Medicine, Geology, Agriculture, Meteorology, Classification,…: The Life and Times of John Walker (1730–1803), Professor of Natural History at Edinburgh University. [REVIEW] Metascience 20 (2):395-399.
    Mineralogy, chemistry, botany, medicine, geology, agriculture, meteorology, classification,…: The life and times of John Walker (1730–1803), Professor of Natural History at Edinburgh University Content Type Journal Article DOI 10.1007/s11016-010-9471-7 Authors David Oldroyd, School of History and Philosophy, University of New South Wales, Sydney, 2052 Australia Journal Metascience Online ISSN 1467-9981 Print ISSN 0815-0796.
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  15.  4
    Howard Brody & Peter Vinten-Johansen (1991). Teaching the History of Medicine by Case Study and Small Group Discussion. Journal of Medical Humanities 12 (1):19-24.
    A case-study, small-group-discussion (“focal problem”) exercise in the history of medicine was designed, piloted, and evaluated in an overseas course and an on-campus elective course for medical students. Results suggest that this is a feasible approach to teaching history of medicine which can overcome some of the problems often encountered in teaching this subject in the medical curriculum.
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  16.  1
    Christoph Meinel (1979). Teaching the History of Medicine, Science and Technology in the Federal Republic of Germany and in West Berlin. Annals of Science 36 (3):279-289.
    History of medicine is taught in West Germany as part of the standard course offerings for medical students and is well represented at many universities. But history of science and technology unfortunately still lacks any adequate supporting system and accordingly barely continues to survive at a few institutions of the Federal Republic. Although history of medicine serves a different function than history of science and technology, closer cooperation between these groups is possible and greatly (...)
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  17.  4
    Ian Dowbiggin (2007). A Concise History of Euthanasia: Life, Death, God, and Medicine. Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
    This deeply informed history traces the controversial record of "mercy-killing," a source of heated debate among doctors and laypeople alike. Dowbiggin examines evolving opinions about what constitutes a good death, taking into account the societal and religious values placed on sin, suffering, resignation, judgment, penance, and redemption. He also examines the bitter struggle between those who stress a right to compassionate and effective end-of-life care and those who define human life in terms of either biological criteria, utilitarian standards, a (...)
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  18.  0
    R. Arnott (2002). The University of Birmingham Medical School and the History of Medicine. Medical Humanities 28 (1):33-34.
    The publication in 1993 by the General Medical Council of Tomorrow's Doctors—Recommendations on Undergraduate Medical Education provided the first real opportunity for many medical schools to advance the introduction of the history of medicine into the undergraduate medical curriculum. While the University of Birmingham Medical School, was not one of the first to introduce the subject, it has been at the forefront of the introduction of the history of medicine into the undergraduate medical curriculum since 1997, (...)
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  19.  0
    John P. Swann (1989). Manuscript Resources in the History of Chemistry at the National Library of Medicine. Annals of Science 46 (3):249-262.
    This paper discusses the chemistry manuscript collection in an institution that does not readily come to mind when searching for unpublished matter on the history of chemistry, the National Library of Medicine in Bethesda, Maryland. This collection includes personal papers of some twentieth-century American chemists and biochemists, lecture notes of British and American chemistry courses of the eighteenth, nineteenth, and twentieth centuries from a variety of institutional settings, and extended oral histories of some major figures in the (...) of modern chemistry and biochemistry. Among those represented in this collection are Joseph Black, Louis Pasteur, George B. Wood, Donald D. Van Slyke, and Albert Szent-Györgyi. In addition to illustrating the type of resources available, this paper also suggests some specific ways in which the collection can contribute to research in the history of chemistry. (shrink)
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  20.  2
    Peter C. Wyer & Suzana A. Silva (2009). Where is the Wisdom? I – A Conceptual History of Evidence‐Based Medicine. Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 15 (6):891-898.
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  21.  6
    Fran Collyer (2010). Origins and Canons: Medicine and the History of Sociology. History of the Human Sciences 23 (2):86-108.
    Differing accounts are conventionally given of the origins of medical sociology and its parent discipline of sociology. These distinct ‘histories’ are justified on the basis that the sociological founders were uninterested in medicine, mortality and disease. This article challenges these ‘constructions’ of the past, proposing the theorization of health not as a ‘late development of sociology’ but an integral part of its formation. Drawing on a selection of key sociological texts, it is argued that evidence of the founders’ sustained (...)
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  22.  1
    Jonathan Simon (2005). In Search of a 'Good Story' for the History of Medicine. Metascience 14 (3):427-429.
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  23.  3
    Ian Wilson (2009). Scratching the Surface of the History of Military Medicine. Metascience 18 (2):285-287.
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  24. Lynn Thorndike & William A. Dunning Fund (1929). Science and Thought in the Fifteenth Century Studies in the History of Medicine and Surgery, Natural and Mathematical Science, Philosophy and Politics. Columbia University Press.
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  25.  90
    Phil Nicholls (1989). Reviews : Roy Porter and Andrew Wear (Eds), Problems and Methods in the History of Medicine, Beckenham: Croom Helm, 1987, £30.00, Ix + 262 Pp. Social History of Medicine: The Journal of the Society for the Social History of Medicine, Volume I, Number I, April 1988, Oxford: Oxford University Press, £35.00 (£12.00) P.A. [REVIEW] History of the Human Sciences 2 (3):403-407.
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  26.  89
    Stephen Bann (1988). History and Her Siblings Law, Medicine and Theology. History of the Human Sciences 1 (1):5-21.
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  27.  13
    Leen De Vreese (2008). Causal (Mis)Understanding and the Search for Scientific Explanations: A Case Study From the History of Medicine. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C 39 (1):14-24.
    In 1747, James Lind carried out an experiment which proved the usefulness of citrus fruit as a cure for scurvy. Nonetheless, he rejected the earlier hypothesis of Bachstrom that the absence of fresh fruit and vegetables was the only cause of the disease. I explain why it was rational for James Lind not to accept Bachstrom’s explanation. I argue that it was the urge for scientific understanding that guided Lind in his rejection and in the development of his alternative theory (...)
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  28.  94
    Simon Pawley (2010). Book Review: Petteri Pietikainen, Neurosis and Modernity: The Age of Nervousness in Sweden. History of Science and Medicine Library, Vol. 2. Leiden: Brill, 2007. ISBN 978-9004160750. Xiii + 391 Pp. 99. [REVIEW] History of the Human Sciences 23 (4):117-120.
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  29.  24
    Matthew K. Wynia (2008). The Short History and Tenuous Future of Medical Professionalism: The Erosion of Medicine's Social Contract. Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 51 (4):565-578.
  30.  25
    Rhonda Martens (2014). Patrick J. Boner Kepler's Cosmological Synthesis: Astrology, Mechanism and the Soul (History of Science and Medicine Library 39; Medieval and Early Modern Science 20) (Leiden: Brill Academic Publishers, 2013), Pp. 204, € 101, $138, ISBN 978 90 04 24608 9 (Hardback). [REVIEW] Early Science and Medicine 19 (2):197-199.
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  31.  81
    Nancy G. Siraisi (2003). History, Antiquarianism, and Medicine: The Case of Girolamo Mercuriale. Journal of the History of Ideas 64 (2):231-251.
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  32.  60
    Rachel A. Ankeny (2003). How History and Philosophy of Science and Medicine Could Save the Life of Bioethics. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 28 (1):115 – 125.
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  33.  16
    Patrick J. Murray (2013). Keir Waddington, An Introduction to the Social History of Medicine: Europe Since 1500 (Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan, 2011), Pp. 408, B/W Tables, B/W Photos, € 30.00 (Paperback), ISBN 978 1 403 94693 5. [REVIEW] Early Science and Medicine 18 (3):322-324.
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  34.  18
    Christoph Lüthy (2009). Journals Under Threat: A Joint Response From History of Science, Technology and Medicine Editors. Early Science and Medicine 14 (4):441-444.
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  35.  16
    Marcelo Aranda (2012). Giorgio Strano, Stephen Johnston, Mara Miniati, and Alison Morrison-Low, Eds., European Collections of Scientific Instruments, 1550-1750 (History of Science and Medicine Library 10), (Leiden: Brill, 2009), Pp. Xxii + 218, 13 Pp. Of Plates, Ills., €105, US$ 144, ISBN 978 90 04 17270 8. [REVIEW] Early Science and Medicine 17 (6):667-668.
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  36.  14
    Sachiko Kusukawa (2011). Visualizing Medieval Medicine and Natural History, 1200-1550. Early Science and Medicine 16 (4):354-355.
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  37.  13
    H. Darrel Rutkin (2012). André Goddu, Copernicus and the Aristotelian Tradition: Education, Reading and Philosophy in Copernicus's Path to Heliocentrism (History of Science and Medicine Library 15) (Leiden: Brill, 2010), Pp. Xxvii + 545, Illus., Bibl., Index, € 132.00, $ 183.00, ISBN 978 90 04 1 8107 6. [REVIEW] Early Science and Medicine 17 (6):650-652.
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  38.  1
    Christopher Lawrence (1995). Companion Encyclopedia of the History of Medicine, Edited by WF Bynum and Roy Porter. History of Science 33:105-109.
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  39.  5
    Annual Intensive (2001). Date: 16–18 August 2001. Location: Lisboa, Portugal. Theme: Wisdom of the Health Care Professional. Organization: ESPMH. Information: Prof. Dr. Henk ten Have, Dept. Of Ethics, Philosophy and History of Medicine, Catholic University of Nijmegen, PO Box 9101, NL-6500 HB, Nijmegen, The Netherlands; Fax:+ 31-24-3540254; Email: H. Tenhave@ Efg. Kun. Nl. [REVIEW] Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 4 (253).
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  40.  4
    Jesse D. Sloane (forthcoming). The State, the Nation, and Their Limits: Recent Publications on the History of Chinese Medicine. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C.
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  41.  3
    Gert H. Brieger (2004). On Second Thought and Other Essays in the History of Medicine and Science (Review). Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 47 (2):312-314.
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  42.  0
    Plinio Prioreschi (1990). Does History of Medicine Teach Useful Lessons? Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 35 (1):97-104.
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  43.  1
    Gert H. Brieger (2004). Bodies and Borders: A New Cultural History of Medicine. Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 47 (3):402-421.
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  44.  4
    Charles T. Wolfe & Benjamin Goldberg (2012). Luuc Kooijmans . Death Defied: The Anatomy Lessons of Frederik Ruysch , Trans. Diane Webb. Leiden: Brill, 2011. History of Science and Medicine Library, Vol. 18. Pp. Xvi+472, Index. $169.00 (Cloth). [REVIEW] Hopos: The Journal of the International Society for the History of Philosophy of Science 2 (1):177-182.
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  45.  4
    Kuni Sakamoto (2013). Gideon Manning, Ed., Matter and Form in Early Modern Science and Philosophy (History of Science and Medicine Library 28) (Leiden: Brill, 2012), Pp. X + 248, Illus., Index, € 105.00, $ 144.00, ISBN 978 90 04 21870 3. [REVIEW] Early Science and Medicine 18 (6):574-576.
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  46.  3
    Irina Podgorny (2014). Alex Levine and Adriana Novoa . ¡Darwinistas! The Construction of Evolutionary Thought in Nineteenth Century Argentina . History of Science and Medicine Library 27. Scientific and Learned Cultures and Their Institutions 5. Leiden: Brill, 2012. Pp. Viii+279. $136.00 (Cloth). [REVIEW] Hopos: The Journal of the International Society for the History of Philosophy of Science 4 (1):179-182.
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  47.  0
    Owsei Temkin (1980). The Double Face of Janus and Other Essays in the History of Medicine. Journal of the History of Biology 13 (2):347-351.
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  48.  1
    Walter Pagel (1963). A History Of Medicine. Volume Ii. Early Greek, Hindu, And Persian Medicine By Henry E. Sigerist. [REVIEW] Isis: A Journal of the History of Science 54:499-501.
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  49.  1
    Lynn Thorndike (1929). Vatican Latin Manuscripts in the History of Science and Medicine. Isis: A Journal of the History of Science 13:53-102.
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  50.  1
    Paul Weindling (1986). Medicine and Modernization: The Social History of German Health and Medicine. History of Science 24:277-301.
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