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Search results for 'Medicine History' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Anders Ottosson (2011). The Manipulated History of Manipulations of Spines and Joints? Rethinking Orthopaedic Medicine Through the 19th Century Discourse of European Mechanical Medicine. Medicine Studies 3 (2):83-116.score: 81.0
    More than one single professional group deals with therapeutic manipulations of the spine and the joints. Osteopaths, Chiropractors, Naprapaths, Physical Therapists (and a contingent Physicians) all share this interest. Each profession is also very clear about where its bulk of knowledge stems from. The disciplines that are reckoned as the oldest are from the USA. A number of “inventors” are to be found, all without a formal university degree in Medicine. Andrew Taylor Still (1828–1917) came up with his system (...)
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  2. Kurt Fleischhauer (2006). Goals of Medicine in the Course of History and Today: A Study in the History and Philosophy of Medicine. Distributed by Almqvist & Wiksell International.score: 66.0
     
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  3. Louis Alvin Turley (1935). The History of the Philosophy of Medicine. Norman, University of Oklahoma Press.score: 66.0
  4. Frances Garrett (2009). The Alchemy of Accomplishing Medicine ( Sman Sgrub ): Situating the Yuthok Heart Essence ( G.Yu Thog Snying Thig ) in Literature and History. [REVIEW] Journal of Indian Philosophy 37 (3):207-230.score: 54.0
    This essay examines historical and contemporary connections between Buddhist and medical traditions through a study of the Accomplishing Medicine ( sman sgrub ) practice and the Yuthok Heart Essence ( G.yu thog snying thig ) anthology. Accomplishing Medicine is an esoteric Buddhist yogic and contemplative exercise focused on several levels of “alchemical” transformation. The article will trace the acquisition of this practice from India by Tibetan medical figures and its assimilation into medical practice. It will propose that this (...)
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  5. Tjaart W. Schillhorn van Veen (1998). One Medicine: The Dynamic Relationship Between Animal and Human Medicine in History and at Present. [REVIEW] Agriculture and Human Values 15 (2):115-120.score: 54.0
    The relation and collaboration of human and animal medicine had its ups and downs throughout history. The interaction between these two disciplines has been especially fruitful in the broad areas of patho-physiology and of epidemiology. An exploration of the interaction between the two disciplines, using historical and contemporary examples in comparative medicine, zoonoses, zooprophylaxis, and human-animal bond, reveals that a better understanding of animal and human disease, as well as societal changes such as interest in non-conventional (...), are leading to a broader concept of one medicine that includes animal and human medicine as well as social and other sciences. (shrink)
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  6. George F. Solomon (1990). The Discursive Formation of the Body in the History of Medicine. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 15 (5):515-537.score: 51.0
    The principal argument of the present paper is that the human body is as much a reflective formation of multiple discourses as it is an effect of natural and environmental processes. This paper examines the implications of this argument, and suggests that recognizing the body in this light can be illuminating, not only for our conception of the body, but also for our understanding of medicine. Since medicine is itself a discursive formation, a science with both a (...), and a future, it is argued that much can be learned by reflecting on the progression of models, or "paradigm-shifts,", in terms of which modern medicine has articulated the human body that figures at the heart of its discourse. Four historical periods of medicine will be considered, each one governed by its own distinctive paradigm. It is argued, finally, that, with the emergence of behavioural medicine, and, more particularly, psychoneuroimmunology, a new discursive formation in medicine, one can see a new conceptualization of the human body beginning to take shape; and that this new figure of the body makes it possible for the very first time to conceive the construction of testable hypotheses regarding correlations between the objective body of science and the phenomenological body of experienced meaning. Keywords: body of experienced meaning, discursive formation, immunocompetence, objective body, psychoneuro-immunology CiteULike Connotea Del.icio.us What's this? (shrink)
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  7. Andrzej Szczeklik (2005). Catharsis: On the Art of Medicine. University of Chicago Press.score: 51.0
    The ancient Greeks used the term catharsis for the cleansing of both the body by medicine and the soul by art. In this inspiring book, internationally renowned cardiologist Andrzej Szczeklik draws deeply on our humanistic heritage to describe the artistry and the mystery of being a doctor. Moving between examples ancient and contemporary, mythological and scientific, Catharsis explores how medicine and art share common roots and pose common challenges. The process of diagnosis, for instance, belongs to a world (...)
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  8. Roger Qvarsell & Jan Sundin (1995). The Social and Cultural History of Medicine and Health in Sweden. History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 17 (2):315 - 336.score: 51.0
    The social and cultural history of medicine and health is a growing field of research in Sweden, stimulated by the present political, economic and social concern about health and health care. Since there have never been any chairs in the history of medicine within the medical faculty, the topic has mostly been approached by historians of science and ideas, social historians and anthropologists and sociologists interested in long-term developments. Psychiatry and psychiatric care is one of the (...)
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  9. Elizabeth A. Williams (1994). The Physical and the Moral: Anthropology, Physiology, and Philosophical Medicine in France, 1750-1850. Cambridge University Press.score: 51.0
    This book explores the tradition of the 'science of man' in French medicine of the era 1750-1850, focusing on controversies about the nature of the 'physical-moral' relation and their effects on the role of medicine in French society. Its chief purpose is to recover the history of a holistic tradition in French medicine that has been neglected because it lay outside the mainstream themes of modern medicine, which include experimental, reductionist, and localistic conceptions of health (...)
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  10. P. L. Entralgo (1996). From Galen to Magnetic Resonance: History of Medicine in Latin America. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 21 (6):571-591.score: 51.0
    Spanish influence in the New World was particularly acute in the areas of medicine and medical education. From the time of Columbus forward prominent medical experts journeyed to Latin America establishing medical schools and research centers. This essay chronicles the history of Latin America with a strong focus on the physicians and scientists who brought modern scientific medicine, as it wag then known in Western Europe, to the Americas.
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  11. D. M. Levin & G. F. Solomon (1990). The Discursive Formation of the Body in the History of Medicine. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 15 (5):515-537.score: 51.0
    The principal argument of the present paper is that the human body is as much a reflective formation of multiple discourses as it is an effect of natural and environmental processes. This paper examines the implications of this argument, and suggests that recognizing the body in this light can be illuminating, not only for our conception of the body, but also for our understanding of medicine. Since medicine is itself a discursive formation, a science with both a (...), and a future, it is argued that much can be learned by reflecting on the progression of models, or “paradigm-shifts,”, in terms of which modern medicine has articulated the human body that figures at the heart of its discourse. Four historical periods of medicine will be considered, each one governed by its own distinctive paradigm. It is argued, finally, that, with the emergence of behavioural medicine, and, more particularly, psychoneuroimmunology, a new discursive formation in medicine, one can see a new conceptualization of the human body beginning to take shape; and that this new figure of the body makes it possible for the very first time to conceive the construction of testable hypotheses regarding correlations between the objective body of science and the phenomenological body of experienced meaning. (shrink)
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  12. Laurie Zoloth (1999). The Best Laid Plans: Resistant Community and the Intrepid Vision in the History of Managed Care Medicine. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 24 (5):461 – 491.score: 51.0
    In the move to critique managed care, the essential principles that first made it a reasonable alternative to fee-for-service medicine can easily be lost. Careful reflection on the history of early grassroots movements that created managed care, and on selected textual narratives of the founders of the managed care organizations at their inception, offers us insight into which of the critical premises and goals of that effort might be reclaimed as we analyze the current managed care environment.
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  13. Thomas K. McElhinney & Edmund D. Pellegrino (2001). The Institute on Human Values in Medicine: Its Role and Influence in the Conception and Evolution of Bioethics. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 22 (4):291-317.score: 48.0
    For ten years, 1971–1981, the Institute onHuman Values in Medicine (IHVM) played a keyrole in the development of Bioethics as afield. We have written this history andanalysis to bring to new generations ofBioethicists information about the developmentof their field within both the humanitiesdisciplines and the health professions. Thepioneers in medical humanities and ethics cametogether with medical professionals in thedecade of the 1960s. By the 1980s Bioethics wasa fully recognized discipline. We show the rolethat IHVM programs played in defining (...)
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  14. Charles M. Bourne & Rethy K. Chhem (forthcoming). War Medicine as Springboard for Early Knowledge Construction in Radiology. Medicine Studies:1-18.score: 48.0
    Shortly after X-ray technology was discovered, it was utilized in war medicine. In this paper, the authors consider how the challenging context of war created fertile conditions for learning, as early radiologists were forced to find solutions to the unique problems posed during wartime. The “battlefield” became the “classroom” where radiologists constructed knowledge in X-ray instrumentation, methods, and education, as well as in medicine generally. Through an examination of two broad historical wartime examples, the authors illustrate how X-rays (...)
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  15. David Oldroyd (2011). Mineralogy, Chemistry, Botany, Medicine, Geology, Agriculture, Meteorology, Classification,…: The Life and Times of John Walker (1730–1803), Professor of Natural History at Edinburgh University. [REVIEW] Metascience 20 (2):395-399.score: 48.0
    Mineralogy, chemistry, botany, medicine, geology, agriculture, meteorology, classification,…: The life and times of John Walker (1730–1803), Professor of Natural History at Edinburgh University Content Type Journal Article DOI 10.1007/s11016-010-9471-7 Authors David Oldroyd, School of History and Philosophy, University of New South Wales, Sydney, 2052 Australia Journal Metascience Online ISSN 1467-9981 Print ISSN 0815-0796.
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  16. Howard Brody & Peter Vinten-Johansen (1991). Teaching the History of Medicine by Case Study and Small Group Discussion. Journal of Medical Humanities 12 (1):19-24.score: 48.0
    A case-study, small-group-discussion (“focal problem”) exercise in the history of medicine was designed, piloted, and evaluated in an overseas course and an on-campus elective course for medical students. Results suggest that this is a feasible approach to teaching history of medicine which can overcome some of the problems often encountered in teaching this subject in the medical curriculum.
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  17. Norbert W. Paul (2009). Medicine Studies: Exploring the Interplays of Medicine, Science and Societies Beyond Disciplinary Boundaries. [REVIEW] Medicine Studies 1 (1):3-10.score: 48.0
    Taking into account how much modern medicine is a function of—and at the same time has a function in—science and technology, it is hardly surprising that both the approach of science studies and the idea of the social and cultural construction of health, disease, and bodies overlap, generally and specifically, in the realm of the novel field of MEDICINE STUDIES. The work already done in science and technology studies as well as in social studies of medicine, together (...)
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  18. Frank W. Stahnisch (2005). Historical and Philosophical Perspectives on Experimental Practice in Medicine and the Life Sciences. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 26 (5):397-425.score: 48.0
    The aim of this paper is to discuss a key question in the history and philosophy of medicine, namely how scholars should treat the practices and experimental hypotheses of modern life science laboratories. The paper seeks to introduce some prominent historiographical methods and theoretical approaches associated with biomedical research. Although medical scientists need no convincing that experimentation has a significant function in their laboratory work, historians, philosophers, and sociologists long neglected its importance when examining changes in medical theories (...)
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  19. F. Töpfer & U. Wiesing (2005). The Medical Theory of Richard Koch II: Natural Philosophy and History. [REVIEW] Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 8 (3):323-334.score: 48.0
    Richard Koch1 became known in the 1920s with works on basic medical theory. Among these publications, the character of medical action and its status within the theory of science was presented as the most important theme. While science is inherently driven by the pursuit of knowledge for its own sake, medicine pursues the practical purpose of helping the sick. Therefore, medicine must be seen as an active relationship between a helping and a suffering person. While elucidating this relationship, (...)
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  20. Fran Collyer (2010). Origins and Canons: Medicine and the History of Sociology. History of the Human Sciences 23 (2):86-108.score: 45.0
    Differing accounts are conventionally given of the origins of medical sociology and its parent discipline of sociology. These distinct ‘histories’ are justified on the basis that the sociological founders were uninterested in medicine, mortality and disease. This article challenges these ‘constructions’ of the past, proposing the theorization of health not as a ‘late development of sociology’ but an integral part of its formation. Drawing on a selection of key sociological texts, it is argued that evidence of the founders’ sustained (...)
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  21. Peter C. Wyer & Suzana A. Silva (2009). Where is the Wisdom? I – A Conceptual History of Evidence‐Based Medicine. Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 15 (6):891-898.score: 42.0
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  22. Wolfgang Uwe Eckart (ed.) (2006). Man, Medicine, and the State: The Human Body as an Object of Government Sponsored Medical Research in the 20th Century. Steiner.score: 39.0
    Mit Beitragen von: Wolfgang U. Eckart, Christian Bonah, Wolfgang U. Eckart / Andreas Reuland, Alexander Neumann, Peter Steinkamp, Volker Roelcke, Anne ...
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  23. Matthew K. Wynia (2008). The Short History and Tenuous Future of Medical Professionalism: The Erosion of Medicine's Social Contract. Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 51 (4):565-578.score: 39.0
  24. Christoph Lüthy (2009). Journals Under Threat: A Joint Response From History of Science, Technology and Medicine Editors. Early Science and Medicine 14 (4):441-444.score: 39.0
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  25. Marcelo Aranda (2012). Giorgio Strano, Stephen Johnston, Mara Miniati, and Alison Morrison-Low, Eds., European Collections of Scientific Instruments, 1550-1750 (History of Science and Medicine Library 10), (Leiden: Brill, 2009), Pp. Xxii + 218, 13 Pp. Of Plates, Ills., €105, US$ 144, ISBN 978 90 04 17270 8. [REVIEW] Early Science and Medicine 17 (6):667-668.score: 39.0
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  26. Patrick J. Murray (2013). Keir Waddington, An Introduction to the Social History of Medicine: Europe Since 1500 (Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan, 2011), Pp. 408, B/W Tables, B/W Photos, € 30.00 (Paperback), ISBN 978 1 403 94693 5. [REVIEW] Early Science and Medicine 18 (3):322-324.score: 39.0
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  27. Sachiko Kusukawa (2011). Visualizing Medieval Medicine and Natural History, 1200-1550. Early Science and Medicine 16 (4):354-355.score: 39.0
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  28. H. Darrel Rutkin (2012). André Goddu, Copernicus and the Aristotelian Tradition: Education, Reading and Philosophy in Copernicus's Path to Heliocentrism (History of Science and Medicine Library 15) (Leiden: Brill, 2010), Pp. Xxvii + 545, Illus., Bibl., Index, € 132.00, $ 183.00, ISBN 978 90 04 1 8107 6. [REVIEW] Early Science and Medicine 17 (6):650-652.score: 39.0
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  29. Rachel A. Ankeny (2003). How History and Philosophy of Science and Medicine Could Save the Life of Bioethics. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 28 (1):115 – 125.score: 39.0
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  30. Leen De Vreese (2008). Causal (Mis)Understanding and the Search for Scientific Explanations: A Case Study From the History of Medicine. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C 39 (1):14-24.score: 39.0
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  31. Simon Pawley (2010). Book Review: Petteri Pietikainen, Neurosis and Modernity: The Age of Nervousness in Sweden. History of Science and Medicine Library, Vol. 2. Leiden: Brill, 2007. ISBN 978-9004160750. Xiii + 391 Pp. 99. [REVIEW] History of the Human Sciences 23 (4):117-120.score: 39.0
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  32. David J. Rothman (2003/2008). Strangers at the Bedside: A History of How Law and Bioethics Transformed Medical Decision Making. Aldinetransaction.score: 39.0
    Introduction: making the invisible visible -- The nobility of the material -- Research at war -- The guilded age of research -- The doctor as whistle-blower -- New rules for the laboratory -- Bedside ethics -- The doctor as stranger -- Life through death -- Commissioning ethics -- No one to trust -- New rules for the bedside -- Epilogue: The price of success.
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  33. Robert L. Martensen (2004). The Brain Takes Shape: An Early History. Oxford University Press.score: 39.0
    This fine book tells an important story of how long-standing notions about the body as dominated by spirit-like humors were transformed into scientific descriptions of its solid tissues. Vesalius, Harvey, Descartes, Willis, and Locke all played roles in this transformation, as the cerebral hemispheres and cranial nerves began to take precedence over the role of spirit, passion, and the heart in human thought and behavior. Non of this occurred in a social vacuum, and the book describes the historical context clearly. (...)
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  34. Kuni Sakamoto (2013). Gideon Manning, Ed., Matter and Form in Early Modern Science and Philosophy (History of Science and Medicine Library 28) (Leiden: Brill, 2012), Pp. X + 248, Illus., Index, € 105.00, $ 144.00, ISBN 978 90 04 21870 3. [REVIEW] Early Science and Medicine 18 (6):574-576.score: 39.0
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  35. Virginia Berridge (2010). History, Medicine and the Media. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C 41 (3):304-306.score: 39.0
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  36. Georges Canguilhem (2012). Writings on Medicine. Fordham University Press.score: 39.0
    The idea of nature in medical theory and practice -- Diseases -- Health: popular concept and philosophical question -- Is a pedagogy of healing possible? -- The problem of regulation in the organism and in society.
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  37. David Cantor (2004). Book Review: On Second Thought and Other Essays in the History of Medicine and Science. [REVIEW] Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 25 (2):157-164.score: 39.0
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  38. C. D. (2003). The Idea of a Germ - Spreading Germs: Disease Theories and Medical Practice in Britain, 1865-1900 Michael Worboys, Cambridge Studies in the History of Medicine, Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, 2000, Pp. XVI+327, Price £45 Hardback, ISBN 0-521-77302-. [REVIEW] Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C 34 (2):367-373.score: 39.0
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  39. Jacalyn Duffin (2001). Discovery and Disease: History, Philosophy, and Medicine in the Year 2000. History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 23 (1):75 - 85.score: 39.0
  40. Christos Lynteris (2013). The Spirit of Selflessness in Maoist China: Socialist Medicine and the New Man. Palgrave Macmillan.score: 39.0
    The book narrates how, called to embody this selfless spirit, medical doctors were trapped in a spiral between cultivation and abolition, leading to the explosion of ideology during the Cultural Revolution.
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  41. Simone Mammola (2013). Does the History of Medicine Begin Where the History of Philosophy Ends? An Example of Interdisciplinarity in the Early Modern Era. History of European Ideas:1-17.score: 39.0
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  42. Nancy G. Siraisi (2003). History, Antiquarianism, and Medicine: The Case of Girolamo Mercuriale. Journal of the History of Ideas 64 (2):231-251.score: 39.0
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  43. Katherine Arens (2012). Key Texts of Johann Wilhelm Ritter (1776–1810) on the Science and Art of Nature . Translations and Essays by Jocelyn Holland . History of Science and Medicine Library 16 (Medieval and Early Modern Science 13). Leiden, Boston: Brill, 2010. Pp. Xiv+713. $183.00 (Cloth). [REVIEW] Hopos: The Journal of the International Society for the History of Philosophy of Science 2 (1):169-172.score: 39.0
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  44. Stephen Bann (1988). History and Her Siblings Law, Medicine and Theology. History of the Human Sciences 1 (1):5-21.score: 39.0
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  45. Gert H. Brieger (1999). Bodies and Borders: A New History of Medicine. Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 17 (3):402.score: 39.0
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  46. Deborah C. Brunton (2003). The Idea of a Germ: Spreading Germs: Disease Theories and Medical Practice in Britain, 1865–1900 Michael Worboys, Cambridge Studies in the History of Medicine, Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, 2000, Pp. Xvi+ 327, Price£ 45 Hardback, ISBN 0-521-77302-4. [REVIEW] Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C: Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences 34 (2):367-373.score: 39.0
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  47. François Delaporte (2013). Figures of Medicine: Blood, Face Transplants, Parasites. Fordham University Press.score: 39.0
    Animal blood -- Fabricating noses -- The face transplant -- The Manson effect -- Robles' disease -- Chagas' error.
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  48. François Delaporte (1994). The History of Medicine According to Foucault. In Jan Ellen Goldstein (ed.), Foucault and the Writing of History. Blackwell. 1--7.score: 39.0
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  49. Ian Dowbiggin (2007). A Concise History of Euthanasia: Life, Death, God, and Medicine. Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.score: 39.0
    Traces the controversial history of euthanasia, examining evolving opinions about what constitutes a good death and taking issue with the right-to-die movement over the question of legalizing assisted suicide.
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  50. Jacalyn Duffin & Ulrich Trohler (2002). Book Reviews-History of Medicine. A Scandalously Short Introduction. History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 24 (3-4):523-524.score: 39.0
     
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