Search results for 'Medicine Judaism' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Albert B. Sabin (1983). Judaism and Medicine. Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 26 (2):188-197.
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  2. Lynne Fallwell (2009). Mitchell B. Hart.The Healthy Jew: The Symbiosis of Judaism and Modern Medicine. X + 280 Pp., Bibl., Index. New York: Cambridge University Press, 2007. $28. [REVIEW] Isis 100 (2):379-380.
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  3. David M. Feldman (1986). Health and Medicine in the Jewish Tradition: L'hayyim--To Life. Crossroad.
  4. Jonathan Wiesen (ed.) (2009). And You Shall Surely Heal: The Albert Einstein College of Medicine Synagogue Compendium of Torah and Medicine. Ktav Pub. House.
     
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  5. Fred Rosner (1991). Modern Medicine and Jewish Ethics. Yeshiva University Press.
     
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  6.  91
    Norbert M. Samuelson (2011). Reflections on the Distinctness of Judaism and the Sciences. Zygon 46 (2):396-412.
    Abstract. The object of this essay is to explain what there is about discussions of Judaism and the sciences that is distinctive from discussions about religion in general and the sciences. The description draws primarily but not exclusively from recent meetings of the Judaism, Medicine, and Science Group in Tempe, Arizona. The author's Jewish Faith and Modern Science, together with a selective bibliography of writings in this subfield, are used to generate a list of science issues—focused around (...)
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  7. Elliot N. Dorff & Louis E. Newman (eds.) (1995). Contemporary Jewish Ethics and Morality: A Reader. Oxford University Press.
    Over the past decade much significant new work has appeared in the field of Jewish ethics. While much of this work has been devoted to issues in applied ethics, a number of important essays have explored central themes within the tradition and clarified the theoretical foundations of Jewish ethics. This important text grew out of the need for a single work which accurately and conveniently reflects these developments within the field. The first text of its kind in almost two decades, (...)
     
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  8.  43
    Elliot N. Dorff (1998). Matters of Life and Death: A Jewish Approach to Modern Medical Ethics. Jewish Publication Society.
    In Matters of Life and Death Elliot Dorff thoroughly addresses this unavoidable confluence of medical technology and Jewish law and ethics.
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  9. David M. Feldman (2006). Where There's Life, There's Life. Yashar Books.
     
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  10. Isaac Franck & J. DAvid Bleich (eds.) (1980). Biomedical Ethics in Perspective of Jewish Teaching and Tradition: Proceedings of an Academic Conference, November 13, 1977. College of Jewish Studies of Greater Washington (D.C.).
     
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  11.  28
    David L. Freeman & Judith Z. Abrams (eds.) (1999). Illness and Health in the Jewish Tradition: Writings From the Bible to Today. Jewish Publication Society.
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  12. Gad Freudenthal (ed.) (1998). Jewish Responses to Aids. Ktav Pub. House.
     
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  13. Mordechai Halperin & Leora Moshe (eds.) (2006). Refuʼah Ṿa-Halakhah: Halakhah le-Maʻaśeh: Asupat Maʼamarim le-Khenes Ṿeʻidat Rabane Eropah, Iyar 766 (Mai 2006). [REVIEW] Ha-Makhon ʻal Shem Dr. Falḳ Shlezinger le-Ḥeḳer Ha-RefuʼAh ʻal Pi Ha-Torah.
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  14. Mordechai Halperin (2011). Refuʼah, Metsiʼut Ṿa-Halakhah: U-Leshon Ḥahamim Marpe. Ha-Makhon ʻa. Sh. Dr. Falḳ Shlezinger le-Ḥeḳer Ha-RefuʼAh ʻal-Pi Ha-Torah, le-Yad Ha-Merkaz Ha-RefuʼI Shaʻare Tsedeḳ.
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  15. Shelomoh Zalman Oyerbakh (2005). Sefer Shulḥan Shelomoh: ʻerkhe Refuʼah: Asupat Berure Halakhot U-Fisḳe Dinim. Śimḥah Bunem Ben Avraham Yosef Laizerzon.
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  16. Ḥanina Yiśraʼ Roṭenberg & el ben Eliʻezer Sheraga (2005). Sefer Divre Ḥanina: ʻal Refuʼah U-Fiḳuaḥ Nefesh: Kolel Maśa U-Matan U-Veʼurim Be-Ṭipul Be-Ḥolim Sofaniyim .. [REVIEW] Ḥanina YiśraʼEl Ben Eliʻezer Sheraga Roṭenberg.
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  17. Ḥanina Yiśraʼel ben Eliʻezer Sheraga Roṭenberg (2005). Sefer Divre Ḥanina: ʻal Refuʼah U-Fiḳuaḥ Nefesh: Kolel Maśa U-Matan U-Veʼurim Be-Ṭipul Be-Ḥolim Sofaniyim .. Ḥanina Yiśraʼel Ben Eliʻezer Sheraga Roṭenberg.
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  18. Isaac Shailat (2013). Refuʼah, Halakhah Ṿe-Khaṿanot Ha-Torah: Shevaʻ Sugyot Be-ʻinyane Refuʼah Ṿe-Halakhah. Hotsaʼat Shilat.
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  19. Paul Steinberg (2003). Study Guide to Jewish Ethics: A Reader's Companion to Matters of Life and Death, to Do the Right and the Good, Love Your Neighbor and Yourself. The Jewish Publication Society.
    This companion to Elliot Dorff's three books on Jewish ethics -- Matters of Life and Death , To Do the Right and the Good , and Love Your Neighbor and Yourself -- is designed for group as well as individual study. Through suggested readings from Dorff's books, probing questions, lively discussion topics, and simple writing exercises, readers will be able to analyze and clarify their own positions on a host of controversial issues: sex, surrogate motherhood, adoption, family abuse, responsibilities for (...)
     
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  20. Moshe David Tendler (ed.) (1975). Medical Ethics: A Compendium of Jewish Moral, Ethical, and Religious Principles in Medical Practice. Committee on Religious Affairs, Federation of Jewish Philanthropies of New York.
     
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  21. David A. Teutsch (2005). Bioethics. Reconstructionist Rabbinical College Press.
  22.  39
    David Novak (1979). Judaism and Contemporary Bioethics. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 4 (4):347-366.
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  23.  26
    T. M. Rudavsky (1997). Philosophical Cosmology in Judaism. Early Science and Medicine 2 (2):149-184.
    In this paper I shall examine the philosophical cosmology of medieval Jewish thinkers as developed against the backdrop of their views on time and creation. I shall concentrate upon the Neoplatonic and Aristotelian traditions, with a particular eye to the interweaving of astronomy, cosmology and temporality. This interweaving occurs in part because of the influence of Greek cosmological and astronomical texts upon Jewish philosophers. The tension between astronomy and cosmology is best seen in Maimonides' discussion of creation. Gersonides, on the (...)
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  24.  39
    Jacob Stegenga, Ashley Kennedy, Serife Tekin, Saana Jukola & Robyn Bluhm (forthcoming). New Directions in Philosophy of Medicine. In James Marcum (ed.), Bloomsbury Companion to Contemporary Philosophy of Medicine. Bloomsbury 343-367.
    The purpose of this chapter is to describe what we see as several important new directions for philosophy of medicine. This recent work (i) takes existing discussions in important and promising new directions, (ii) identifies areas that have not received sufficient and deserved attention to date, and/or (iii) brings together philosophy of medicine with other areas of philosophy (including bioethics, philosophy of psychiatry, and social epistemology). To this end, the next part focuses on what we call the “epistemological (...)
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  25.  60
    Jeremy Howick (2011). The Philosophy of Evidence-Based Medicine. Wiley-Blackwell, Bmj Books.
    The philosophy of evidence-based medicine -- What is EBM? -- What is good evidence for a clinical decision? -- Ruling out plausible rival hypotheses and confounding factors : a method -- Resolving the paradox of effectiveness : when do observational studies offer the same degree of evidential support as randomized trials? -- Questioning double blinding as a universal methodological virtue of clinical trials : resolving the Philip's paradox -- Placebo controls : problematic and misleading baseline measures of effectiveness -- (...)
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  26. Eric J. Cassell (2004). The Nature of Suffering and the Goals of Medicine. Oxford University Press.
    Here is a thoroughly updated edition of a classic in palliative medicine. Two new chapters have been added to the 1991 edition, along with a new preface summarizing where progress has been made and where it has not in the area of pain management. This book addresses the timely issue of doctor-patient relationships arguing that the patient, not the disease, should be the central focus of medicine. Included are a number of compelling patient narratives. Praise for the first (...)
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  27. Lawrence Torcello (2013). What's the Harm? Why the Mainstreaming of Complementary and Alternative Medicine is an Ethical Problem. Ethics in Biology, Engineering and Medicine 4 (4):333-344.
    This paper argues that it is morally irresponsible for modern medical providers or health care institutions to support and advocate the integration of CAM practices (i.e. homeopathy, acupuncture, energy healing, etc.) with conventional modern medicine. The results of such practices are not reliable beyond that of placebo. As a corollary, it is argued that prescribing placebos perceived to stand outside the norm of modern medicine is morally inappropriate. Even when such treatments do no direct physical harm, they create (...)
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  28.  69
    A. la Caze (2009). Evidence-Based Medicine Must Be .. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 34 (5):509-527.
    Proponents of evidence-based medicine (EBM) provide the “hierarchy of evidence” as a criterion for judging the reliability of therapeutic decisions. EBM's hierarchy places randomized interventional studies (and systematic reviews of such studies) higher in the hierarchy than observational studies, unsystematic clinical experience, and basic science. Recent philosophical work has questioned whether EBM's special emphasis on evidence from randomized interventional studies can be justified. Following the critical literature, and in particular the work of John Worrall, I agree that many of (...)
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  29. Hillel D. Braude (2009). Clinical Intuition Versus Statistics: Different Modes of Tacit Knowledge in Clinical Epidemiology and Evidence-Based Medicine. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 30 (3):181-198.
    Despite its phenomenal success since its inception in the early nineteen-nineties, the evidence-based medicine movement has not succeeded in shaking off an epistemological critique derived from the experiential or tacit dimensions of clinical reasoning about particular individuals. This critique claims that the evidence-based medicine model does not take account of tacit knowing as developed by the philosopher Michael Polanyi. However, the epistemology of evidence-based medicine is premised on the elimination of the tacit dimension from clinical judgment. This (...)
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  30.  21
    Marianne Boenink (2010). Molecular Medicine and Concepts of Disease: The Ethical Value of a Conceptual Analysis of Emerging Biomedical Technologies. [REVIEW] Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 13 (1):11-23.
    Although it is now generally acknowledged that new biomedical technologies often produce new definitions and sometimes even new concepts of disease, this observation is rarely used in research that anticipates potential ethical issues in emerging technologies. This article argues that it is useful to start with an analysis of implied concepts of disease when anticipating ethical issues of biomedical technologies. It shows, moreover, that it is possible to do so at an early stage, i.e. when a technology is only just (...)
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  31.  40
    Havi Carel (2011). Phenomenology and its Application in Medicine. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 32 (1):33-46.
    Phenomenology is a useful methodology for describing and ordering experience. As such, phenomenology can be specifically applied to the first person experience of illness in order to illuminate this experience and enable health care providers to enhance their understanding of it. However, this approach has been underutilized in the philosophy of medicine as well as in medical training and practice. This paper demonstrates the usefulness of phenomenology to clinical medicine. In order to describe the experience of illness, we (...)
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  32. Anders Ottosson (2011). The Manipulated History of Manipulations of Spines and Joints? Rethinking Orthopaedic Medicine Through the 19th Century Discourse of European Mechanical Medicine. Medicine Studies 3 (2):83-116.
    More than one single professional group deals with therapeutic manipulations of the spine and the joints. Osteopaths, Chiropractors, Naprapaths, Physical Therapists (and a contingent Physicians) all share this interest. Each profession is also very clear about where its bulk of knowledge stems from. The disciplines that are reckoned as the oldest are from the USA. A number of “inventors” are to be found, all without a formal university degree in Medicine. Andrew Taylor Still (1828–1917) came up with his system (...)
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  33.  16
    Jonathan Sholl (2015). Putting Phenomenology in its Place: Some Limits of a Phenomenology of Medicine. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 36 (6):391-410.
    Several philosophers have recently argued that phenomenology is well-suited to help understand the concepts of health, disease, and illness. The general claim is that by better analysing how illness appears to or is experienced by ill individuals—incorporating the first-person perspective—some limitations of what is seen as the currently dominant third-person or ‘naturalistic’ approaches to understand health and disease can be overcome. In this article, after discussing some of the main insights and benefits of the phenomenological approach, I develop three general (...)
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  34.  36
    Kathryn Montgomery (2006). How Doctors Think: Clinical Judgment and the Practice of Medicine. Oxford University Press.
    How Doctors Think defines the nature and importance of clinical judgment. Although physicians make use of science, this book argues that medicine is not itself a science but rather an interpretive practice that relies on clinical reasoning. A physician looks at the patient's history along with the presenting physical signs and symptoms and juxtaposes these with clinical experience and empirical studies to construct a tentative account of the illness. How Doctors Think is divided into four parts. Part one introduces (...)
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  35.  66
    Maya J. Goldenberg (2012). Innovating Medical Knowledge: Undestanding Evidence-Based Medicine as a Socio-Medical Phenomenon. In Nikolaos Sitaras (ed.), Evidence-Based Medicine: Closer to Patients or Scientists? InTech Open Science
    Because few would object to evidence-based medicine’s (EBM) principal task of basing medical decisionmaking on the most judicious and up-to-date evidence, the debate over this prolific movement may seem puzzling. Who, one may ask, could be against evidence (Carr-Hill, 2006)? Yet this question belies the sophistication of the evidence-based movement. This chapter presents the evidence-based approach as a socio-medical phenomenon and seeks to explain and negotiate the points of disagreement between supporters and detractors. This is done by casting EBM (...)
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  36.  2
    Jane Maienschein (2009). Regenerative Medicine in Historical Context. Medicine Studies 1 (1):33-40.
    The phrase “regenerative medicine” is used so often and for so many different things, with such enthusiasm or worry, and often with a sense that this is something radically new. This paper places studies of regeneration and applications in regenerative medicine into historical perspective. In fact, the first stem cell experiment was carried out in 1907, and many important lines of research have contributed since. This paper explores both what we can learn about the history and what we (...)
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  37.  67
    Mona Gupta (2007). Does Evidence-Based Medicine Apply to Psychiatry? Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 28 (2):103.
    Evidence-based psychiatry (EBP) has arisen through the application of evidence-based medicine (EBM) to psychiatry. However, there may be aspects of psychiatric disorders and treatments that do not conform well to the assumptions of EBM. This paper reviews the ongoing debate about evidence-based psychiatry and investigates the applicability, to psychiatry, of two basic methodological features of EBM: prognostic homogeneity of clinical trial groups and quantification of trial outcomes. This paper argues that EBM may not be the best way to pursue (...)
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  38.  14
    Alena M. Buyx (2008). Be Careful What You Wish For? Theoretical and Ethical Aspects of Wish-Fulfilling Medicine. Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 11 (2):133-143.
    There is a growing tendency for medicine to be used not to prevent or heal illnesses, but to fulfil individual personal wishes such as wishes for enhanced work performance, better social skills, children with specific characteristics, stress relief, a certain appearance or a better sex life. While recognizing that the subject of wish-fulfilling medicine may vary greatly and that it may employ very different techniques, this article argues that wish-fulfilling medicine can be described as a cohesive phenomenon (...)
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  39.  26
    Marcel Mertz (2007). Complementary and Alternative Medicine: The Challenges of Ethical Justification. [REVIEW] Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 10 (3):329-345.
    With the prevalence of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) increasing in western societies, questions of the ethical justification of these alternative health care approaches and practices have to be addressed. In order to evaluate philosophical reasoning on this subject, it is of paramount importance to identify and analyse possible arguments for the ethical justification of CAM considering contemporary biomedical ethics as well as more fundamental philosophical aspects. Moreover, it is vital to provide adequate analytical instruments for this task, such (...)
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  40.  26
    Malcolm Parker (2002). Whither Our Art? Clinical Wisdom and Evidence-Based Medicine. Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 5 (3):273-280.
    The relationship between evidence-based medicine (EBM) and clinical judgement is the subject of conceptual and practical dispute. For example, EBM and clinical guidelines are seen to increasingly dominate medical decision-making at the expense of other, human elements, and to threaten the art of medicine. Clinical wisdom always remains open to question. We want to know why particular beliefs are held, and the epistemological status of claims based in wisdom or experience. The paper critically appraises a number of claims (...)
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  41.  39
    Norbert Paul (1998). Incurable Suffering From the “Hiatus Theoreticus”? Some Epistemological Problems in Modern Medicine and the Clinical Relevance of Philosophy of Medicine. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 19 (3):229-251.
    Up to now neither the question, whether all theoretical medical knowledge can at least be described as scientific, nor the one how exactly access to the existing scientific and theoretical medical knowledge during clinical problem-solving is made, has been sufficiently answered. Scientific theories play an important role in controlling clinical practice and improving the quality of clinical care in modern medicine on the one hand, and making it vindicable on the other. Therefore, the vagueness of unexplicit interrelations between (...)''s stock of knowledge and medical practice appears as a gap in the theoretical concept of modern medicine which can be described as Hiatus theoreticus in the anatomy of medicine. A central intention of the paper is to analyze the role of philosophy of medicine for the clarification of the theoretical basis of medical practice. Clinical relevance and normativity in the sense of modern theory of science are suggested as criteria to establish a differentiation between philosophy of medicine as a primary medical discipline and the application of general philosophy in medicine. (shrink)
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  42.  5
    Iain Brassington (2007). On Heidegger, Medicine, and the Modernity of Modern Medical Technology. Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 10 (2):185-195.
    This paper examines medicine’s use of technology in a manner from a standpoint inspired by Heidegger’s thinking on technology. In the first part of the paper, I shall suggest an interpretation of Heidegger’s thinking on the topic, and attempt to show why he associates modern technology with danger. However, I shall also claim that there is little evidence that medicine’s appropriation of modern technology is dangerous in Heidegger’s sense, although there is no prima facie reason why it mightn’t (...)
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  43.  30
    Jeremy R. Simon (2010). Advertisement for the Ontology for Medicine. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 31 (5):333-346.
    The ontology of medicine—the question of whether disease entities are real or not—is an underdeveloped area of philosophical inquiry. This essay explains the primary question at issue in medical ontology, discusses why answering this question is important from both a philosophical and a practical perspective, and argues that the problem of medical ontology is unique, i.e., distinct, from the ontological problems raised by other sciences and therefore requires its own analysis.
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  44.  29
    Y. Michael Barilan & Moshe Weintraub (2001). The Naturalness of the Artificial and Our Concepts of Health, Disease and Medicine. Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 4 (3):311-325.
    This article isolates ten prepositions, which constitute the undercurrent paradigm of contemporary discourse of health disease and medicine. Discussion of the interrelationship between those prepositions leads to a systematic refutation of this paradigm. An alternative set is being forwarded. The key notions of the existing paradigm are that health is the natural condition of humankind and that disease is a deviance from that nature. Natural things are harmonious and healthy while human made artifacts are coercive interference with natural balance. (...)
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  45.  14
    William E. Stempsey (2005). The Philosophy of Medicine: Development of a Discipline. [REVIEW] Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 7 (3):243-251.
    This paper is a criticalexamination of the development of thephilosophy of medicine as a discipline. Ithighlights two major themes in the contemporarydebate about the philosophy of medicine: thescope of the discipline and the relation of thediscipline to its cognate disciplines. A broadview of the philosophy of medicine is defendedand the philosophy of medicine is seen as aphilosophical sub-discipline. These viewsdepend in important ways on three factors: ageneral metaphysical world view, particularunderstandings of the cognate disciplines, andthe perspective (...)
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  46.  14
    Alan Petersen & Kate Seear (2009). In Search of Immortality: The Political Economy of Anti-Aging Medicine. [REVIEW] Medicine Studies 1 (3):267-279.
    In Search of Immortality: The Political Economy of Anti-aging Medicine Content Type Journal Article Category Original Paper Pages 267-279 DOI 10.1007/s12376-009-0020-x Authors Alan Petersen, Monash University Sociology Program, School of Political and Social Inquiry Clayton VIC 3800 Australia Kate Seear, Monash University Sociology Program, School of Political and Social Inquiry Clayton VIC 3800 Australia Journal Medicine Studies Online ISSN 1876-4541 Print ISSN 1876-4533 Journal Volume Volume 1 Journal Issue Volume 1, Number 3.
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  47.  28
    Peter J. Forshaw (2008). "Paradoxes, Absurdities, and Madness": Conflict Over Alchemy, Magic and Medicine in the Works of Andreas Libavius and Heinrich Khunrath. Early Science and Medicine 13 (1):53-81.
    Both Andreas Libavius and Heinrich Khunrath graduated from Basel Medical Academy in 1588, though the theses they defended reveal antithetical approaches to medicine, despite their shared interests in iatrochemistry and transmutational alchemy. Libavius argued in favour of Galenic allopathy while Khunrath promoted the contrasting homeopathic approach of Paracelsus and the utility of the occult doctrine of Signatures for medical purposes. This article considers these differences in the two graduates' theses, both as intimations of their subsequent divergent notions of the (...)
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  48.  6
    Norbert W. Paul (2009). Medicine Studies: Exploring the Interplays of Medicine, Science and Societies Beyond Disciplinary Boundaries. [REVIEW] Medicine Studies 1 (1):3-10.
    Taking into account how much modern medicine is a function of—and at the same time has a function in—science and technology, it is hardly surprising that both the approach of science studies and the idea of the social and cultural construction of health, disease, and bodies overlap, generally and specifically, in the realm of the novel field of MEDICINE STUDIES. The work already done in science and technology studies as well as in social studies of medicine, together (...)
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  49.  31
    Marco Buzzoni (2003). On Medicine as a Human Science. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 24 (1):79-94.
    All the powerful influences exertedby the subjective-interpersonal dimension onthe organic or technical-functional dimensionof sickness and health do not make anintersubjective test concerning medicaltherapeutic results impossible. Theseinfluences are not arbitrary; on the contrary,they obey laws that are de facto sufficientlystable to allow predictions and explanationssimilar to those of experimental sciences.While, in this respect, the rules concerninghuman action are analogous to the scientificlaws of nature, they can at any time be revokedby becoming aware of them. Law-like andreproducible regularities in the sciences ofman (...)
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  50.  21
    Lennart Nordenfelt (1998). On Medicine and Health Enhancement - Towards a Conceptual Framework. Medicine, Healthcare and Philosophy 1 (1):5-12.
    This paper contains an attempt at constructing a semantic framework for the field of health enhancement. The latter is here conceived as an extremely general category covering the whole area of health care and health promotion. With this framework as a basis I attempt to define the place of medicine within the enterprise of health enhancement. I finally indicate some normative issues for the future, in particular problems and possible developments for medicine as a species of health enhancement.
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