Search results for 'Medicine Social aspects' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Alena M. Buyx (2008). Be Careful What You Wish For? Theoretical and Ethical Aspects of Wish-Fulfilling Medicine. Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 11 (2):133-143.score: 216.0
    There is a growing tendency for medicine to be used not to prevent or heal illnesses, but to fulfil individual personal wishes such as wishes for enhanced work performance, better social skills, children with specific characteristics, stress relief, a certain appearance or a better sex life. While recognizing that the subject of wish-fulfilling medicine may vary greatly and that it may employ very different techniques, this article argues that wish-fulfilling medicine can be described as a cohesive (...)
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  2. Andrew Stark (2006). The Limits of Medicine. Cambridge University Press.score: 210.0
    What are the final limits of medicine? What should we not try to cure medically, even if we had the necessary financial resources and technology? This book philosophically addresses these questions by examining two mirror-image debates in tandem. Members of certain groups, who are deemed by traditional standards to have a medical condition, such as deafness, obesity, or anorexia, argue that they have created their own cultures and ways of life. Curing their conditions would be a form of genocide. (...)
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  3. Shigehisa Kuriyama (1999). The Expressiveness of the Body and the Divergence of Greek and Chinese Medicine. Zone Books.score: 210.0
     
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  4. David N. Weisstub (ed.) (1998). Research on Human Subjects: Ethics, Law, and Social Policy. Pergamon.score: 207.0
    There have been serious controversies in the latter part of the 20th century about the roles and functions of scientific and medical research. In whose interests are medical and biomedical experiments conducted and what are the ethical implications of experimentation on subjects unable to give competent consent? From the decades following the Second World War and calls for the global banning of medical research to the cautious return to the notion that in controlled circumstances, medical research on human subjects is (...)
     
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  5. Paul T. Durbin (ed.) (1984). A Guide to the Culture of Science, Technology, and Medicine. Free Press.score: 201.0
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  6. Michael Martin (1981). Is Medicine a Social Science? Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 6 (4):345-360.score: 198.0
    The question, "Is medicine a social science?" can be understood in three different ways. One interpretation suggests that medicine is merely a social science, which is obviously false. Another interpretation is that medicine might be in part a social science. The third interpretation of the question is, "Is the social scientific dimension of medicine very important?" Three claims are considered about the social scientific dimension of medicine. Although these claims are (...)
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  7. Alan Cribb (2005). Health and the Good Society: Setting Healthcare Ethics in Social Context. Oxford University Press.score: 189.0
    What is health policy for? In Health and the Good Society, Alan Cribb addresses this question in a way that cuts across disciplinary boundaries. His core argument is that biomedical ethics should draw upon public health values and ethics; specifically, he argues that everybody has some share of responsibility for health, including a responsibility for promoting greater health equality. In the process, Cribb argues for a major rethink of the whole project of health education.
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  8. Anna-Teresa Tymieniecka & Evandro Agazzi (eds.) (2001). Life Interpretation and the Sense of Illness Within the Human Condition. Kluwer Academic Publishers.score: 183.0
    In medicine the understanding and interpretation of the complex reality of illness currently refers either to an organismic approach that focuses on the physical or to a 'holistic' approach that takes into account the patient's human sociocultural involvement. Yet as the papers of this collection show, the suffering human person refers ultimately to his/her existential sphere. Hence, praxis is supplemented by still other perspectives for valuation and interpretation: ethical, spiritual, and religious. Can medicine ignore these considerations or push (...)
     
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  9. Joëlle Vailly, Janina Kehr & Jörg Niewöhner (eds.) (2011). De la Vie Biologique à la Vie Sociale: Approches Sociologiques Et Anthropologiques. La Découverte.score: 183.0
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  10. Bradford H. Gray (1981). Human Subjects in Medical Experimentation: A Sociological Study of the Conduct and Regulation of Clinical Research. R.E. Krieger Pub. Co..score: 174.0
     
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  11. Jesús Ballesteros & Encarna Fernández (eds.) (2007). Biotecnología y Posthumanismo. Editorial Aranzadi.score: 174.0
    La obra recoge, desde una perspectiva interdisciplinar, las aportaciones de un grupo de investigadores españoles e italianos que han trabajado conjuntamente durante varios años en distintas cuestiones en torno a las posibilidades y riesgos de los avances biotecnológicos y su incidencia en el campo de los derechos humanos. Los estudios y debates se han realizado en el marco del programa de doctorado internacional sobre "Derechos humanos: Problemas actuales" encabezado por las Universidades de Valencia y Palermo. El Profesor Jesús Ballesteros, Catedrático (...)
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  12. John Frederic Kilner, C. Christopher Hook & Diane B. Uustal (eds.) (2002). Cutting-Edge Bioethics: A Christian Exploration of Technologies and Trends. W.B. Eerdmans.score: 174.0
     
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  13. Melanie Phillips (1985). Doctors' Dilemmas: Medical Ethics and Contemporary Science. Methuen.score: 174.0
     
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  14. Elliot N. Dorff & Louis E. Newman (eds.) (1995). Contemporary Jewish Ethics and Morality: A Reader. Oxford University Press.score: 162.0
    Over the past decade much significant new work has appeared in the field of Jewish ethics. While much of this work has been devoted to issues in applied ethics, a number of important essays have explored central themes within the tradition and clarified the theoretical foundations of Jewish ethics. This important text grew out of the need for a single work which accurately and conveniently reflects these developments within the field. The first text of its kind in almost two decades, (...)
     
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  15. Tamara Thompson (ed.) (2011). The Ethics of Medical Testing. Greenhaven Press.score: 162.0
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  16. Steven M. Flipse, Maarten C. A. Sanden & Patricia Osseweijer (2013). The Why and How of Enabling the Integration of Social and Ethical Aspects in Research and Development. Science and Engineering Ethics 19 (3):703-725.score: 144.0
    New and Emerging Science and Technology (NEST) based innovations, e.g. in the field of Life Sciences or Nanotechnology, frequently raise societal and political concerns. To address these concerns NEST researchers are expected to deploy socially responsible R&D practices. This requires researchers to integrate social and ethical aspects (SEAs) in their daily work. Many methods can facilitate such integration. Still, why and how researchers should and could use SEAs remains largely unclear. In this paper we aim to relate motivations (...)
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  17. Steven M. Flipse, Maarten Ca van der Sanden & Patricia Osseweijer (2013). The Why and How of Enabling the Integration of Social and Ethical Aspects in Research and Development. Science and Engineering Ethics 19 (3):703-725.score: 144.0
    New and Emerging Science and Technology (NEST) based innovations, e.g. in the field of Life Sciences or Nanotechnology, frequently raise societal and political concerns. To address these concerns NEST researchers are expected to deploy socially responsible R&D practices. This requires researchers to integrate social and ethical aspects (SEAs) in their daily work. Many methods can facilitate such integration. Still, why and how researchers should and could use SEAs remains largely unclear. In this paper we aim to relate motivations (...)
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  18. Sonja Olin-Lauritzen & Lars-Christer Hydén (eds.) (2007). Medical Technologies and the Life World: The Social Construction of Normality. Routledge.score: 135.0
    Although the use of new health technologies in healthcare and medicine is generally seen as beneficial, there has been little analysis of the impact of such technologies on people's lives and understandings of health and illness. This book explores how new technologies not only provide hope for cure and well-being, but also introduce new ethical dilemmas and raise questions about the "natural" body. Focusing on the ways new health technologies intervene into our lives and affect our ideas about normalcy, (...)
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  19. Marcel Mertz (2007). Complementary and Alternative Medicine: The Challenges of Ethical Justification. [REVIEW] Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 10 (3):329-345.score: 135.0
    With the prevalence of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) increasing in western societies, questions of the ethical justification of these alternative health care approaches and practices have to be addressed. In order to evaluate philosophical reasoning on this subject, it is of paramount importance to identify and analyse possible arguments for the ethical justification of CAM considering contemporary biomedical ethics as well as more fundamental philosophical aspects. Moreover, it is vital to provide adequate analytical instruments for this task, (...)
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  20. Dennis V. Parke (1995). Ethical Aspects of the Safety of Medicines and Other Social Chemicals. Science and Engineering Ethics 1 (3):283-298.score: 132.0
    The historical background of the discovery of adverse health effects of medicines, food additives, pesticides, and other chemicals is reviewed, and the development of national and international regulations and testing procedures to protect the public against the toxic effects of these drugs and chemicals is outlined. Ethical considerations of the safety evaluation of drugs and chemicals by human experimentation and animal toxicity studies, ethical problems associated with clinical trials, with the falsification of clinical and toxicological data, and with inadequate experimental (...)
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  21. Professor Dennis V. Parke (1995). Ethical Aspects of the Safety of Medicines and Other Social Chemicals. Science and Engineering Ethics 1 (3):283-298.score: 132.0
    The historical background of the discovery of adverse health effects of medicines, food additives, pesticides, and other chemicals is reviewed, and the development of national and international regulations and testing procedures to protect the public against the toxic effects of these drugs and chemicals is outlined. Ethical considerations of the safety evaluation of drugs and chemicals by human experimentation and animal toxicity studies, ethical problems associated with clinical trials, with the falsification of clinical and toxicological data, and with inadequate experimental (...)
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  22. Lennart Nordenfelt (2001). On the Goals of Medicine, Health Enhancement and Social Welfare. Health Care Analysis 9 (1):15-23.score: 128.0
  23. Robert Baker (ed.) (1999). The American Medical Ethics Revolution: How the Ama's Code of Ethics has Transformed Physicians' Relationships to Patients, Professionals, and Society. Johns Hopkins University Press.score: 120.0
    The American Medical Association enacted its Code of Ethics in 1847, the first such national codification. In this volume, a distinguished group of experts from the fields of medicine, bioethics, and history of medicine reflect on the development of medical ethics in the United States, using historical analyses as a springboard for discussions of the problems of the present, including what the editors call "a sense of moral crisis precipitated by the shift from a system of fee-for-service (...) to a system of fee-for-system medicine, better known as 'managed care.'" The authors begin with a look at how the medical profession began to consider ethical issues in the 1800s and subsequent developments in the 1900s. They then address the sociological, historical, ethical, and legal aspects of the practice of medicine. Later chapters discuss current and future challenges to medical ethics and professional values. Appendixes display various versions of the AMA's Code of Ethics as it has evolved over time. Contributors: George J. Annas, J.D., M.P.H., Arthur Isak Applbaum, Ph.D., Robert B. Baker, Ph.D., Chester R. Burns, M.D., Ph.D., Arthur L. Caplan, Ph.D., Alexander Morgan Capron, J.D., Christine K. Cassel, M.D., Linda L. Emanuel, M.D., Ph.D., Eliot L. Freidson, Ph.D., Albert R. Jonsen, Ph.D., Stephen R. Latham, J.D., Ph.D., Susan E. Lederer, Ph.D., Florencia Luna, Ph.D., Edmund D. Pellegrino, M.D., Charles E. Rosenberg, Ph.D., Mark Siegler, M.D., Rosemary A. Stevens, Ph.D., Robert M. Tenery, Jr., M.D., Robert M. Veatch, Ph.D., John Harley Warner, Ph.D., Paul Root Wolpe, Ph.D. (shrink)
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  24. Christopher Lawrence & Steven Shapin (eds.) (1998). Science Incarnate: Historical Embodiments of Natural Knowledge. The University of Chicago Press.score: 120.0
    Ever since Greek antiquity "disembodied knowledge" has often been taken as synonymous with "objective truth." Yet we also have very specific mental images of the kinds of bodies that house great minds--the ascetic philosopher versus the hearty surgeon, for example. Does truth have anything to do with the belly? What difference does it make to the pursuit of knowledge whether Einstein rode a bicycle, Russell was randy, or Darwin flatulent? Bringing body and knowledge into such intimate contact is occasionally seen (...)
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  25. R. S. Downie (1980). Caring and Curing: A Philosophy of Medicine and Social Work. Methuen.score: 120.0
  26. Pierre Bourdieu (2004). Science of Science and Reflexivity. University of Chicago Press.score: 120.0
    Over the last four decades, the French sociologist Pierre Bourdieu produced one of the most imaginative and subtle bodies of social theory of the postwar era. When he died two years ago, he was considered to be a thinker on a par with Foucault, Barthes, and Lacan--a public intellectual as influential to his generation as Sartre was to his. Science of Science and Reflexivity will be welcomed as a companion volume to Bourdieu's now seminal An Invitation to Reflexive Sociology (...)
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  27. Dana Cook Grossman & Heinz Valtin (eds.) (1999). Great Issues for Medicine in the Twenty-First Century: Ethical and Social Issues Arising Out of Advances in the Biomedical Sciences. New York Academy of Sciences.score: 120.0
     
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  28. Iris Marion Young (2005). On Female Body Experience: "Throwing Like a Girl" and Other Essays. Oxford University Press.score: 120.0
    Written over a span of more than two decades, the essays by Iris Marion Young collected in this volume describe diverse aspects of women's lived body experience in modern Western societies. Drawing on the ideas of several twentieth century continental philosophers--including Simone de Beauvoir, Martin Heidegger, Luce Irigaray, Julia Kristeva, and Maurice Merleau-Ponty--Young constructs rigorous analytic categories for interpreting embodied subjectivity. The essays combine theoretical description of experience with normative evaluation of the unjust constraints on their freedom and opportunity (...)
     
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  29. Robert J. Barnet (2003). Ivan Illich and the Nemesis of Medicine. Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 6 (3):273-286.score: 117.0
    Ivan Illich, philosopher, historian, priest and social commentator died in Bremen, Germany on December 2, 2002. Illich was noted for his critique of the Church, education and medicine but his concepts dealt with more fundamental issues. This article reveals aspects of Illich, the man, and explores his ideas as they apply to the meaning of medicine and, in particular, the role of health care in contemporary society.
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  30. Francois Berger, Sjef Gevers, Ludwig Siep & Klaus-Michael Weltring (2008). Ethical, Legal and Social Aspects of Brain-Implants Using Nano-Scale Materials and Techniques. Nanoethics 2 (3):241-249.score: 112.0
    Nanotechnology is an important platform technology which will add new features like improved biocompatibility, smaller size, and more sophisticated electronics to neuro-implants improving their therapeutic potential. Especially in view of possible advantages for patients, research and development of nanotechnologically improved neuro implants is a moral obligation. However, the development of brain implants by itself touches many ethical, social and legal issues, which also apply in a specific way to devices enabled or improved by nanotechnology. For researchers developing nanotechnology such (...)
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  31. Henry Pratt Newsholme (1937). Christian Ethics and Social Health. London, J. Heritage.score: 111.0
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  32. Oonagh Corrigan (ed.) (2009). The Limits of Consent: A Socio-Ethical Approach to Human Subject Research in Medicine. Oxford University Press.score: 108.0
    Since its inception as an international requirement to protect patients and healthy volunteers taking part in medical research, informed consent has become the primary consideration in research ethics. Despite the ubiquity of consent, however, scholars have begun to question its adequacy for contemporary biomedical research. This book explores this issue, reviewing the application of consent to genetic research, clinical trials, and research involving vulnerable populations. For example, in genetic research, information obtained from an autonomous research participant may have significant bearing (...)
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  33. Holger Andreas (2008). Ontological Aspects of Measurement. Axiomathes 18 (3):379-394.score: 108.0
    The concept of measurement is fundamental to a whole range of different disciplines, including not only the natural and engineering sciences, but also laboratory medicine and certain branches of the social sciences. This being the case, the concept of measurement has a particular relevance to the development of top-level ontologies in the area of knowledge engineering. For this reason, the present paper is concerned with ontological aspects of measurement. We are searching for a list of concepts that (...)
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  34. Robert S. Wigton (1996). Social Judgement Theory and Medical Judgement. Thinking and Reasoning 2 (2 & 3):175 – 190.score: 108.0
    Social judgement theory is particularly well suited to the study of medical judgements. Medical judgements characteristically involve decision making under uncertainty with inevitable error and an abundance of fallible cues. In medicine, as in other areas, SJT research has found wide variation among decision makers in their judgements and in the weighting of clinical information. Strategies inferred from case vignettes differ from physicians' self-described strategies and from the weights suggested by experts. These observations parallel recent findings of unexplained (...)
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  35. Raphael Sassower & Michael A. Grodin (1988). Beyond Medical Ethics: New Directions for Philosophy and Medicine. [REVIEW] Journal of Medical Humanities and Bioethics 9 (2):121-134.score: 108.0
    A unique relationship exists between physicians and philosophers — one that expands on the constructive potential of the liaison between physicians and, for example, theologians, on the one hand, or, social workers on the other. This liaison should focus in the scientific aspects of medicine, not just the ethical aspects. Philosophers can provide physicians with a perspective on both the philosophy and the history of medicine through the ages — a sense of how medicine (...)
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  36. Ignaas Devisch (2011). Progress in Medicine: Autonomy, Oughtonomy and Nudging. Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 17 (5):857-861.score: 108.0
    Rationale: In this article, I argue that we need a new perspective in the debate on autonomy in medicine, to understand many of the problems we face today – dilemmas that are situated at the intersection of autonomy and heteronomy, such as why well informed and autonomous people make unhealthy lifestyle choices. If people do not choose what they want, this is not simply caused by their lack of character or capability, but also by the fact that absolute autonomy (...)
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  37. Mihaela Frunza (2010). Ethical Aspects of Spiritual Medicine. The Case of Intercessory Prayer Therapy. Journal for the Study of Religions and Ideologies 6 (17):101-115.score: 108.0
    The main purpose of this article is to explore, from an ethical perspective, one particular branch of what is today called “spiritual medicine”: namely, prayer therapy. Several landmark studies in the literature will be thoroughly examined, respectively the classical study of Byrd (1988), the replica of Harris et al. (1999), and the controversial study of Leibovici (2001). Beginning with these studies and the related controversies surrounding them, the religious features and ethical consequences of prayer therapy are investigated. The ethical (...)
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  38. Rebecca J. Cook, Bernard M. Dickens & Mahmoud F. Fathalla (2003). Reproductive Health and Human Rights: Integrating Medicine, Ethics, and Law. Clarendon Press.score: 108.0
    The concept of reproductive health promises to play a crucial role in improving women's health and rights around the world. It was internationally endorsed by a United Nations conference in 1994, but remains controversial because of the challenge it presents to conservative agencies: it challenges policies of suppressing public discussion on human sexuality and regulating its private expressions. Reproductive Health and Human Rights is designed to equip healthcare providers and administrators to integrate ethical, legal, and human rights principles in protection (...)
     
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  39. David T. Ozar (1985). Social Ethics, the Philosophy of Medicine, and Professional Responsibility. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 6 (3).score: 102.0
    The social ethics of medicine is the study and ethical analysis of social structures which impact on the provision of health care by physicians. There are many such social structures. Not all these structures are responsive to the influence of physicians as health professionals. But some social structures which impact on health care are prompted by or supported by important preconceptions of medical practice. In this article, three such elements of the philosophy of medicine (...)
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  40. Barry Hoffmaster (1981). Family Medicine as a Social Science. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 6 (4):387-410.score: 102.0
    The branch of clinical medicine most likely to qualify as a social science is family medicine. Whether family medicine is a social science is addressed in four steps. First, the nature of family medicine is outlined. Second, the extent to which social science knowledge is used in family practice is discussed. Third, the extent to which family medicine can qualify as a social science is considered with respect to an orthodox model (...)
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  41. Sarah Kuhn (1998). When Worlds Collide: Engineering Students Encounter Social Aspects of Production. [REVIEW] Science and Engineering Ethics 4 (4):457-472.score: 102.0
    To design effective and socially sensitive systems, engineers must be able to integrate a technology-based approach to engineering problems with concerns for social impact and the context of use. The conventional approach to engineering education is largely technology-based, and even when additional courses with a social orientation are added, engineering graduates are often not well prepared to design user- and context-sensitive systems. Using data from interviews with three engineering students who had significant exposure to a socially-oriented perspective on (...)
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  42. Edmond A. Murphy (1978). Some Epistemological Aspects of the Model in Medicine. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 3 (4):273-292.score: 102.0
    SummaryCertain revolutionary changes in medicine—measurement, chemistry, genetics—have led to recasting both the criteriology and the conceptualization of the terms of discourse. But advances along this path rest no longer on naive observation but intimately and inextricably involve modeling, that is, a system of inference which derives no immediate warrant from the primordial data of the senses. This system is not totally new in quality, since all “fact” involves interpretation of data; nor is it entirely new in having heuristic value (...)
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  43. Mark Risjord (1993). Relativism and the Social Scientific Study of Medicine. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 18 (2):195-212.score: 102.0
    Does the social scientific study of medicine require a commitment to relativism? Relativism claims that some subject (e.g., knowledge claims or moral judgments) is relative to a background (e.g., a culture or conceptual scheme) and that judgments about the subject are incommensurable. Examining the concept of success as it appears in orthodox and nonorthodox medical systems, we see that judgments of success are relative to a background medical system. Relativism requires the social scientific study of medicine (...)
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  44. Jason Adam Wasserman (2014). On Art and Science: An Epistemic Framework for Integrating Social Science and Clinical Medicine. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 39 (3):279-303.score: 102.0
    Calls for incorporating social science into patient care typically have accounted for neither the logistic constraints of medical training nor the methodological fallacies of utilizing aggregate “social facts” in clinical practice. By elucidating the different epistemic approaches of artistic and scientific practices, this paper illustrates an integrative artistic pedagogy that allows clinical practitioners to generate social scientific insights from actual patient encounters. Although there is no shortage of calls to bring social science into medicine, the (...)
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  45. Michiel Korthals & Cristian Timmermann (2012). Reflections on the International Networking Conference “Ethical and Social Aspects of Intellectual Property Rights – Agrifood and Health” Brussels, September 2011. Synesis 3 (1):G66-73.score: 101.0
    Public goods, as well as commercial commodities, are affected by exclusive arrangements secured by intellectual property (IP) rights. These rights serve as an incentive to invest human and material capital in research and development. Particularly in the life sciences, IP rights regulate objects such as food and medicines that are key to securing human rights, especially the right to adequate food and the right to health. Consequently, IP serves private (economic) and public interests. Part of this charge claims that the (...)
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  46. M. H. Kottow (1999). In Defence of Medical Ethics. Journal of Medical Ethics 25 (4):340-343.score: 99.0
    A number of recent publications by the philosopher David Seedhouse are discussed. Although medicine is an eminently ethical enterprise, the technical and ethical aspects of health care practices can be distinguished, therefore justifying the existence of medical ethics and its teaching as a specific part of every medical curriculum. The goal of teaching medical ethics is to make health care practitioners aware of the essential ethical aspects of their work. Furthermore, the contention that rational bioethics is a (...)
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  47. R. M. Kaplan (2009). Health Psychology: Where Are We And Where Do We Go From Here? Mens Sana Monographs 7 (1):3.score: 99.0
    _Human behaviour plays a significant role in most of the leading causes of death. Psychological science has the potential to enhance health outcomes through a better understanding of health promoting and health damaging behaviours. Health psychology and the related field of behavioural medicine focus on the interplay among biological dispositions, behaviour, and social context. The field might advance by building better collaboration with other fields of medicine, sharing expertise on technical aspects of psychometric outcomes assessment, identifying (...)
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  48. Amar Jesani & Tejal Barai-Jaitly (eds.) (2005). Ethics in Health Research: A Social Science Perspective. Centre for Studies in Ethics and Rights.score: 99.0
     
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  49. Kevin Wm Wildes (2001). The Crisis of Medicine: Philosophy and the Social Construction of Medicine. Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 11 (1):71-86.score: 96.0
    : During the past decade there has been a debate about the field of philosophy of medicine. The debate has focused on fundamental questions about whether the field exists and the nature of the field. This article explores the debate and argues that it has paid insufficient attention to the social dimensions of both philosophy and medicine. The article goes on to argue that by exploring this debate one can better understand some of the difficult questions facing (...)
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  50. Margaret Alston (2004). Who is Down on the Farm? Social Aspects of Australian Agriculture in the 21st Century. Agriculture and Human Values 21 (1):37-46.score: 96.0
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