Search results for 'Medicine, Greek and Roman' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  31
    Niall Shanks, Ray Greek & Jean Greek (2009). Philosophy, Ethics, and Humanities in Medicine. Philosophy, Ethics, and Humanities in Medicine 4 (2).
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  2.  21
    Robert C. Jones & Ray Greek (2014). A Review of the Institute of Medicine's Analysis of Using Chimpanzees in Biomedical Research. [REVIEW] Science and Engineering Ethics 20 (2):481-504.
    We argue that the recommendations made by the Institute of Medicine’s 2011 report, Chimpanzees in Biomedical and Behavioral Research : Assessing the Necessity, are methodologically and ethically confused. We argue that a proper understanding of evolution and complexity theory in terms of the science and ethics of using chimpanzees in biomedical research would have had led the committee to recommend not merely limiting but eliminating the use of chimpanzees in biomedical research. Specifically, we argue that a proper understanding of the (...)
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  3. Shigehisa Kuriyama (1999). The Expressiveness of the Body and the Divergence of Greek and Chinese Medicine. Zone Books.
     
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  4. James Longrigg & Danielle Gourevitch (1994). Greek Rational Medicine. Philosophy and Medicine From Alcmaeon to the Alexandrians. History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 16 (3):493.
  5. Galerie Fuer Antike Kunst, Roman Greek, Egyptian Antiquities, Galerie Arete & Herbert A. Cahn (1996). Internationaldissociation of (Dealers in Ancient Art. Minerva 7.
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  6.  18
    G. E. R. Lloyd (2003). In the Grip of Disease: Studies in the Greek Imagination. Oxford University Press.
    This original and lively book uses texts from ancient medicine, epic, lyric, tragedy, historiography, philosophy, and religion to explore the influence of Greek ideas on health and disease on Greek thought. Fundamental issues are deeply implicated: causation and responsibility, purification and pollution, the mind-body relationship and gender differences, authority and the expert, reality and appearances, good government, and good and evil themselves.
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  7.  3
    Ph J. van der Eijk (2005). Medicine and Philosophy in Classical Antiquity: Doctors and Philosophers on Nature, Soul, Health and Disease. Cambridge University Press.
    This work brings together Philip van der Eijk's previously published essays on the close connections that existed between medicine and philosophy throughout antiquity.
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  8. der Eijk & J. Ph (2005). Medicine and Philosophy in Classical Antiquity: Doctors and Philosophers on Nature, Soul, Health and Disease. Cambridge University Press.
    This work brings together Philip van der Eijk's previously-published essays on the close connections that existed between medicine and philosophy throughout antiquity. Medical authors such as the Hippocratic writers, Diocles, Galen, Soranus and Caelius Aurelianus elaborated on philosophical methods such as causal explanation, definition and division and applied key concepts such as the notion of nature to their understanding of the human body. Similarly, philosophers such as Plato and Aristotle were highly valued for their contributions to medicine. This interaction was (...)
     
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  9.  23
    Galen (2011). Method of Medicine. Loeb Classical Library.
    Method of Medicine, a systematic and comprehensive account of the principles of treating injury and disease and one of Galen's greatest and most influential works.
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  10.  57
    W. H. S. Jones (1979). Philosophy and Medicine in Ancient Greece: With an Edition of Peri Archaiēs Iētrikēs. Arno Press.
    SECTION I THE PRE-HIPPOCRATICS AND PLATO So far as is known Ionian philosophy was not connected with medicine in any way. It was, in fact, a thing apart, ...
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  11.  2
    W. H. S. Jones (1948). Philosophy and Medicine in Ancient Greece. Philosophical Review 57 (4):423-425.
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  12.  2
    W. H. S. Jones & E. T. Withington (1909). Malaria and Greek History. Journal of Hellenic Studies 29:378.
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  13. R. J. Hankinson (1988). Method, Medicine and Metaphysics Studies in the Philosophy of Ancient Science.
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  14. W. H. S. Jones & Hippocrates (1946). Philosophy and Medicine in Ancient Greece with an Edition of 'Peri Árchaíes Ietrikes'. The Johns Hopkins Press.
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  15. W. H. S. Jones (1946). Philosophy and Medicine in Ancient Greece : With an Edition of [Peri Arxaies Ietrikes] [de Prisca Medicina]. --. Johns Hopkins Press.
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  16.  6
    G. E. R. Lloyd (1999). Science, Folklore, and Ideology: Studies in the Life Sciences in Ancient Greece. Hackett Pub. Co..
    Taking a set of central issues from ancient Greek medicine and biology, this book studies first the interaction between scientific theorising and folklore or popular assumptions, and second the ideological character of scientific inquiry. Topics of current interest in the philosphy and sociology of science illuminated here include the relationship between primitive thought and early science, and the roles of the consensus of the scientific community, of tradition and of the authority of the written text, in the development of (...)
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  17. J. T. Vallance (1990). The Lost Theory of Asclepiades of Bithynia. Clarendon Press.
    An ancient doctor who advocated the therapeutic benefits of wine and passive exercise was bound to be successful. However, Asclepiades of Bithynia did far more than reform much of traditional Hippocratic therapeutic practice; he devised an extraordinary physical theory which he used to explain all biological phenomena in uniformly simple terms. His work laid the theoretical basis for the anti-theoretical medical sect called Methodism. For his trouble he was despised by his intellectual progeny and, more importantly perhaps, by Galen. None (...)
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  18. Jackie Pigeaud (2006). La Maladie de L'Âme: Étude Sur la Relation de l'Âme Et du Corps Dans la Tradition Médico-Philosophique Antique. Les Belles Lettres.
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  19. Ludwig Edelstein (1943). The Hippocratic Oath, Text, Translation and Interpretation. Baltimore, the Johns Hopkins Press.
     
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  20. Mark G. Kuczewski & Ronald M. Polansky (2000). Bioethics Ancient Themes in Contemporary Issues. Monograph Collection (Matt - Pseudo).
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  21.  42
    Christopher Gill (2010). Naturalistic Psychology in Galen and Stoicism. Oxford University Press.
    This is a study of the psychological ideas of Galen (AD 129-c.210, the most important medical writer in antiquity) and Stoicism (a major philosophical theory in ...
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  22. Paul Kalthoff (1935). Das Gesundheitswesen Bei Aristoteles. Philosophical Review 44:505.
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  23. John Milton & Packard Humanities Institute (1991). Phi Cd Rom #5.3. Packard Humanities Institute.
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  24. R. O. Moon (1923). Hippocrates and His Successors in Relation to the Philosophy of Their Time. Ams Press.
  25. R. O. Moon (1923). Hippocrates and His Successors in Relation to the Philosophy of Their Time the Fitzpatrick Lectures Delivered at the Royal College of Physicians 1921-22. Longmans, Green and Co.
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  26. Langley Porter (1946). Thesis and Antithesis in Medical Philosophy: An Address Delivered to the Society of Nu Sigma Nu. [Mr. And Mrs. Laurence Myers].
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  27. John Precope (1961). Iatrophilosophers of the Hellenic States. London, Heinemann.
  28. Napolitano Valditara & M. Linda (2011). Pietra Filosofale Della Salute: Filosofia Antica E Formazione in Medicina. Quiedit.
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  29. Renate Wittern & Pierre Pellegrin (1996). Hippokratische Medizin Und Antike Philosophie Verhandlungen des Viii. Internationalen Hippokrates-Kolloquiums in Kloster Banz/Staffelstein Vom 23. Bis 28. September 1993. [REVIEW]
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  30. G. W. Bowersock (1969). Greek Sophists in the Roman Empire. Oxford, Clarendon P..
  31.  33
    Alan Cameron (2004). Greek Mythography in the Roman World. OUP Usa.
    By the Roman age the traditional stories of Greek myth had long since ceased to reflect popular culture, and become instead a central element in elite culture. This book illustrates the importance of semi-learned mythographic handbooks in the social, literary, and artistic world of Rome. One of the most intriguing features of these works is the fact that they all cite classical sources for the stories they tell, sources which are often forged.
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  32.  13
    J. E. Lendon (1999). The Rhetoric of Combat: Greek Military Theory and Roman Culture in Julius Caesar's Battle. Classical Antiquity 18 (2):273-329.
    Descriptions of battles in ancient authors are not mirrors of reality, however dim and badly cracked, but are a form of literary production in which the real events depicted are filtered through the literary, intellectual, and cultural assumptions of the author. By comparing the battle descriptions of Julius Caesar to those of Xenophon and Polybius this paper attempts to place those battle descriptions in their intellectual and cultural context. Here Caesar appears as a military intellectual engaged in controversies with experts (...)
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  33.  33
    Catherine M. Keesling (2005). Misunderstood Gestures: Iconatrophy and the Reception of Greek Sculpture in the Roman Imperial Period. Classical Antiquity 24 (1):41-79.
    Anthropologists have defined iconatrophy as a process by which oral traditions originate as explanations for objects that, through the passage of time, have ceased to make sense to their viewers. One form of iconatrophy involves the misinterpretation of statues' identities, iconography, or locations. Stories that ultimately derive from such misunderstandings of statues are Monument-Novellen, a term coined by Herodotean studies. Applying the concept of iconatrophy to Greek sculpture of the Archaic and Classical periods yields three possible examples in which (...)
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  34.  2
    Jason Lewis Saunders (1966). Greek and Roman Philosophy After Aristotle. New York, Free Press.
    PHILOSOPHY Greek and Roman Philosophy After Aristotle brings together over twenty-five of the most important works of Western philosophy written from 322 b.c.e. — the death of Aristotle — to the close of the third century c.e. Eminent ...
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  35.  20
    Charles McNelis (2002). Greek Grammarians and Roman Society During the Early Empire: Statius' Father and His Contemporaries. Classical Antiquity 21 (1):67-94.
    Statius' Silvae 5.3 is a poem written in honor of the poet's dead father. In the course of the poem, Statius recounts his father's life and achievements. Prominent among these accomplishments are the years the elder Statius spent as a teacher of Greek poetry—a grammarian—in Naples. Statius tells us which Greek poets his father taught and to whom. The content and audience of Statius' father's instruction form the basis of this paper. A number of the Greek poets (...)
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  36.  13
    Patricia Rosenmeyer (2008). Greek Verse Inscriptions in Roman Egypt: Julia Balbilla's Sapphic Voice. Classical Antiquity 27 (2):334-358.
    In 130 ce, Hadrian and Sabina traveled to Egyptian Thebes. Inscriptions on the Memnon colossus document the royal visit, including fifty-four lines of Greek verse by Julia Balbilla, an elite Roman woman of Syrian heritage. The poet's style and dialect have been compared to those of Sappho, although the poems' meter and content are quite different from those of her archaic predecessor. This paper explores Balbilla's Memnon inscriptions and their social context. Balbilla's archaic forms and obscure mythological variants (...)
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  37. G. W. Bowersock (2003). Greek Sophists in the Roman Empire. Clarendon Press.
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  38. Oleg V. Bychkov & Anne Sheppard (eds.) (2012). Greek and Roman Aesthetics. Cambridge University Press.
    This anthology of philosophical texts by Greek and Roman authors brings together works from the late fifth century BC to the sixth century AD that comment on major aesthetic issues such as the perception of beauty and harmony in music and the visual arts, structure and style in literature, and aesthetic judgement. It includes important texts by Plato and Aristotle on the status and the role of the arts in society and in education, and Longinus' reflections on the (...)
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  39. Oleg V. Bychkov & Anne Sheppard (eds.) (2010). Greek and Roman Aesthetics. Cambridge University Press.
    This anthology of philosophical texts by Greek and Roman authors brings together works from the late fifth century BC to the sixth century AD that comment on major aesthetic issues such as the perception of beauty and harmony in music and the visual arts, structure and style in literature, and aesthetic judgement. It includes important texts by Plato and Aristotle on the status and the role of the arts in society and in education, and Longinus' reflections on the (...)
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  40. Melissa Lane (2015). CONCLUSION. Futures of Greek and Roman Pasts. In The Birth of Politics: Eight Greek and Roman Political Ideas and Why They Matter. Princeton University Press 313-324.
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  41. C. D. C. Reeve & Patrick Lee Miller (eds.) (2006). Introductory Readings in Ancient Greek and Roman Philosophy. Hackett Publishing Company, Inc..
    A concise anthology for the ancient philosophy survey that ranges from the Presocratics through the Neoplatonists, _Introductory Readings in Ancient Greek and Roman Philosophy_ features essential selections from C.D.C. Reeve's 2004 translation of Plato's _Republic_, which casts reported speech into direct dialogue, as well other translations known for their accuracy and accessibility. Introductions and notes are also included.
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  42. Courtney Roby (2016). Technical Ekphrasis in Greek and Roman Science and Literature: The Written Machine Between Alexandria and Rome. Cambridge University Press.
    Ekphrasis is familiar as a rhetorical tool for inducing enargeia, the vivid sense that a reader or listener is actually in the presence of the objects described. This book focuses on the ekphrastic techniques used in ancient Greek and Roman literature to describe technological artifacts. Since the literary discourse on technology extended beyond technical texts, this book explores 'technical ekphrasis' in a wide range of genres, including history, poetry, and philosophy as well as mechanical, scientific, and mathematical works. (...)
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  43.  18
    T. F. & Arthur Stratton (1932). The Orders of Architecture: Greek, Roman, and Renaissance. Journal of Hellenic Studies 52:133.
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  44.  15
    Richard Broxton Onians (1951). The Origins of European Thought About the Body, the Mind, the Soul, the World, Time, and Fate: New Interpretations of Greek, Roman and Kindred Evidence Also of Some Basic Jewish and Christian Beliefs. Cambridge University Press.
    Onians' remarkable work of scholarship sought to deal with the very roots of European civilization and thought: the fundamental beliefs about life, mind, body, soul, and human destiny that are embodied in the myths and legends of the ancients. The volume is remains a fascinating collection of ideas and explanations of cultures as diverse as the Greeks and the Norse, the Celts and the Jews, and the Chinese and the Romans.
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  45.  4
    G. K. Jenkins (1949). Ashmolean Museum: Guide to the Greek, Roman, and Chinese Coins. Pp. 51; Frontispiece, 9 Plates.Oxford: Printed for the Visitors of the Museum, 1948. Paper, 2s. 6d. Net. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 63 (3-4):144-.
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  46.  8
    G. K. Jenkins & Dorothy B. Waage (1954). Antioch-on-the-Orontes, IV, Part 2: Greek, Roman, Byzantine and Crusaders Coins. Journal of Hellenic Studies 74:233.
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  47.  19
    E. R. Dodds (1953). The Origins of European Thought About the Body, the Mind, the Soul, the World, Time, and Fate. New Interpretations of Greek, Roman and Kindred Evidence, Also of Some Basic Jewish and Christian Beliefs. By R. B. Onians. (C.U.P. 1951. Pp. Xvii + 547. 45s.). [REVIEW] Philosophy 28 (104):86-.
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  48.  11
    J. Tate (1953). Words and Beliefs Richard Broxton Onians: The Origins of European Thought About the Body, the Mind, the Soul, the World, Time, and Fate. New Interpretations of Greek, Roman and Kindred Evidence, Also of Some Basic Jewish and Christian Beliefs. Pp. Xvii+547; 2 Figs. Cambridge: University Press, 1951. Cloth, 45s. Net. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 3 (01):31-34.
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  49.  13
    D. M. Lewis (1971). Sterling Dow: Conventions in Editing. (Greek, Roman and Byzantine Scholarly Aids, 2) Pp. Vi+37. Durham, North Carolina: Duke University, 1969. (Obtainable From Greek, Roman and Byzantine Studies, Box 144, Cambridge, Mass.) Paper, $2. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 21 (02):309-310.
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  50.  10
    Ivor Bulmer-Thomas (1961). Later Greek Geometry G. L. Huxley: Anthemius of Tralles. A Study in Later Greek Geometry. (Greek, Roman, and Byzantine Studies.) Pp. 62. Cambridge, Mass.: Privately Printed, 1959. Paper. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 11 (01):38-39.
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