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Megan J. Laverty [6]Megan Jane Laverty [1]
  1. Megan J. Laverty (2014). The World of Instruction: Undertaking the Impossible. Ethics and Education 9 (1):42-53.
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  2. Megan Jane Laverty (2014). As Luck Would Have It: Thomas Hardy’s Bildungsroman on Leading a Human Life. Studies in Philosophy and Education 33 (6):635-646.
    In this essay, I demonstrate the value of the Bildungsroman for philosophy of education on the grounds that these narratives raise and explore educational questions. I focus on a short story in the Bildungsroman tradition, Thomas Hardy’s “A Mere Interlude”. This story describes the maturation of its heroine by narrating a series of events that transform her understanding of what it means to lead a human life. I connect her conceptual shift with two paradigms for leading a human life. One (...)
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  3. Sophie Haroutunian-Gordon & Megan J. Laverty (2011). Listening: An Exploration of Philosophical Traditions. Educational Theory 61 (2):117-124.
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  4. Megan J. Laverty (2011). Can You Hear Me Now? Jean-Jacques Rousseau on Listening Education. Educational Theory 61 (2):155-169.
    In this essay Megan J. Laverty argues that Jean-Jacques Rousseau's conception of humane communication and his proposal for teaching it have implications for our understanding of the role of listening in education. She develops this argument through a close reading of Rousseau's most substantial work on education, Emile: Or, On Education. Laverty elucidates Rousseau's philosophy of communication, beginning with his taxonomy of the three voices—articulate, melodic, and accentuated—illustrating the ways in which they both enhance and obfuscate understanding. Next, Laverty provides (...)
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  5. David T. Hansen & Megan J. Laverty (2010). Teaching and Pedagogy. In Richard Bailey (ed.), The Sage Handbook of Philosophy of Education. Sage Publication. 223.
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  6. Megan J. Laverty (2009). Gert J.J. Biesta, Beyond Learning: Democratic Education for a Human Future. Studies in Philosophy and Education 28 (6):569-576.
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  7. Megan J. Laverty (2009). Learning Our Concepts. Journal of Philosophy of Education 43 (1):27-40.
    Richard Stanley Peters appreciates the centrality of concepts for everyday life, however, he fails to recognize their pedagogical dimension. He distinguishes concepts employed at the first-order (our ordinary language-use) from second-order conceptual clarification (conducted exclusively by academically trained philosophers). This distinction serves to elevate the discipline of philosophy at the expense of our ordinary language-use. I revisit this distinction and argue that our first-order use of concepts encompasses second-order concern. Individuals learn and teach concepts as they use them. Conceptual understanding (...)
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